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Troika

Member
  • Content Count

    360
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About Troika

  • Title
    Member
  • Birthday Aug 20, 1995

Contact Methods

  • Discord
    Troika#3974
  • Steam
    Troika_Tigsky
  • Xbox Live
    Ice Boy 214

Profile Information

  • Location
    Lewisville, Texas
  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Gaming, Warhammer 40k, D&D
  • Occupation
    Student

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  1. I have a Ryzen 7 2700X and a 16GB kit of G.Skill Ripjaws V DDR4-3600 CL16 PN: F4-3600C16D-16GVKC I saw that particular kit of ram is supported by Ryzen 3rd gen on that board as its on the QVL list for 3rd gen Ryzen. 2nd gen Ryzen only lists 5 3200mhz kits of ram as supported on the QVL list. The board technically does support the kit of ram I already have and I certainly don't expect it to hit 3600mhz. Heck, if I can get 3000mhz, that'd be great. Maybe 3200mhz if I'm lucky. The board should default the kit's speed to 2166mhz then I can manually set the speed in the bios, just like on any
  2. S'not really a "basement" persay. Its more like a positionable cover that can be adjusted by undoing a pair of thumb screws, or in my case, a single one cause I seem to have lost the other one. It is nice to be able to hide all the psu cables even in a decade year old case! I can't say its super standard but If I had to hazard a guess based on the other legacy case I have, a CM Cosmos II, it was probably a feature only really seen in large cases with E-ATX or SSI-EEB/SSI-CEB motherboard support. Despite its solid steel panel, its cool to see that mid towers back in that era were as full feat
  3. Is $7.99 per fitting typical price for L connectors?
  4. Yeah, that curvy bend was super awkward and I don't like it but its what I had to do at the time. Are there inexpensive ones that are good to use? I'm not picky on color or style, as noted by the gatling barrel looking fittings I got from Frozencpu's discount section xD
  5. I have a pair of Noctua NF-F12 ippc 3000s I was hoping to use for this because its what I have on hand.
  6. I see I see. I can't really do anything to fit a rad at the front because I'm actually using the drive sleds to hold 4x4TB drives and my pump/res currently lives on a hotswap drive sled and sits in the 5.25" bays. (Yes I know the res cap is crooked in the picture, I've fixed it since then. The pictures were also taken a few months ago during a test fit and leak test of the system.) The build pictured is also my Ryzen rig that's currently living in that case. It'll be moved out into a different case soon as I want the X58 system to live in this case. This is also my first loop but I t
  7. I have a phat 45mm thick 280mm at the top, though only the fans are visible on the inside, and a 140mm at the rear that currently prevents the stock panel from being able to shut properly. That's my fault, I should have gone for a 120mm instead for the rear. How do you have the fans mounted securely? I'd hate for them to move or fall off and damage something. By compatible I just mean something that sits flush with the case so there isn't a significant panel gap.
  8. So I made a post yesterday about improving the vrm and chipset cooling on my MSI X58 Big Bang Xpower. While I was talking with the folks in the Tech Yes City discord and it dawned on me. I could simply make a new side panel for the case I'm using, a Cooler Master HAF XM. While the stock side panel does have fan mounts, the tubing for the gpu would be in the way and I definitely don't need to add extra stress there. What I was thinking was getting a large acrylic sheet that's sufficiently thick enough to not warp or bend. I could cut out new holes for 120/140mm fans towards the top of the case
  9. Given the age of my X58 motherboard and just how hot the vrm gets with the overclock I have on my i7 970, 4.4Ghz @ 1.35V all core, I'd like to improve the cooling a bit more just for the sake of longevity. The specific motherboard I have is a MSI X58 Big Bang xPower and I don't believe a full cover monoblock was ever made for it, at least not one I can track down. Currently, its watercooled with a Corsair H110i GTX with a pair of Noctua NF-A14 iPPC 3000 fans. The temps are decent but under heavy load they can spike upto 80C. I'm in the process of phasing out that AIO given that its out of its
  10. 1. Yeah, 6th gen Intel or newer if my memory is correct. Or an expensive LSI raid controller out of a server or enterprise machine. 2. I'll look into both and see what is the most econonical. Easiness in expanding certainly would be a big plus. 3. Yeah, gigabit (about 125MB/s of raw throughput) is more than plenty for moving files or loading videos directly from the NAS. 2.5 gigabit would be nice but I'd have to buy new switches and I don't really want to fork over for that. 4. If it doesn't have dual LAN, it probably has USB 3.0 or type C on it, at least ne
  11. 1. That makes sense. 990FX boards are seriously dated and SSDs were only just starting to become mainstream at that time. 2. I've heard of both through the Craft Computing discord server I'm in so I'll probably look into getting more info that way. I know Jeff has posted a few videos about both and a different NAS OS too. 3. So Raid 10 would offer more redundancy than Raid 5 but only if one drive per pair fails. If both drives in one pair fails, I'm SOL. 4. That makes sense, I can probably setup a small box, like a Intel NUC for the router box. I can get mor
  12. I'll have to check, the one I was looking at might have been a lower end model. As for what I'm using, I was just planning on using the motherboard's built in raid controller, which is the AMD SB950 southbridge found on my Asus 990FX Sabertooth R2.0. Its probably super overkill for just a NAS but I can have it do other things and have Windows and Linux installed on a small SSD to manage the NAS and do some maintenance and drive checking with some tools I have. I do plan on building my own router at somepoint, probably using pfsense so it'd be convenient for the NAS drives to exist
  13. So if I threw an SSD into the array, basically using it as a caching device, it would make the whole array faster? Does the size and speed of the SSD matter in this case or is there a particular way you have to configure an array to properly use an SSD cache?
  14. WD Elementals are external drives, aren't they? I dunno if I'd trust something like that in a raid array for my backups. I'd like to use Ironwolfs but they're expensive for four of them and mixing them with my Deskstar NAS drives would make the whole array slower. Its kinda slow over the network already, I don't want to make it slower. I'll see if I can find some reliable alternatives that are also 4TB but run at 7200rpm.
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