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Nayr438

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  1. Like
    Nayr438 got a reaction from rukspuks in [Andoid OS] Can I turn a smartphone into dumbphone?   
    If you remove the App Store then you will need to sideload App updates.
    The Package installer is a core part of Android and is tied to various other functionality of the device, such as application permissions. There is a good chance your phone wont boot without it.
     
    The closest you will get to what your after is a AOSP Rom without Google Services such as LineageOS. Some Applications may however depend on these Google Services. An alternate solution would be to build a custom AOSP Rom that fits your needs with various functionality disabled, however your getting into ROM development at that point.
  2. Like
    Nayr438 got a reaction from Atli-A in What is your favourite IDE?   
    KDevelop and Kate.
  3. Informative
    Nayr438 got a reaction from GougedKirby522 in iwlwifi drivers not loading for ax200 in MX linux   
    Normally you would need to upgrade to linux-firmware-git, however the missing firmware file has not been pushed to upstream. A search tells me that Intel's Own Clear Linux Distribution is using "iwlwifi-cc-a0-59.ucode" instead. I am not sure what Kernel Clear Linux is on or if they have backported this change, however you may need to upgrade to a more Recent Kernel. Current Stable is 5.10
  4. Like
    Nayr438 got a reaction from NeuraCode in vCore?   
    vCore is a virtualized CPU Core/Thread. It's not dedicated and may not even actually exist on the host. What it means to you as a end user, is that you are being allocated enough virtual space to handle 80 threads at a single given time. In terms of how fast these vCores are, there is really no way to tell and it would vary based on other unknown virtualized instances on the host and how heavy they are hitting the host at any given time.
  5. Like
    Nayr438 got a reaction from AnirbanG007 in LTS Enablement Stack for Linux Gaming   
    If your going with an NVIDIA Card, the difference will mostly be negligible between the two.
    If your going with AMD however, then you will lose out on any improvements to the the Graphics and Driver stack until the next major release. This "could" limit your ability to play certain titles under things like Proton and "could" negatively affect performance in various titles. You can however mostly offset this by going with a more upstream kernel such as Liquorix and finding a stable mesa-git repo.
     
    Regardless of your GPU, you may also miss out on various library improvements that Wine may utilize,  which is part of Proton, but these are far less frequent.
     
    Gaming has come a long way and most of the major improvements have landed into Ubuntu's stable repositories, which PopOS! is built on. The overall difference in performance and compatibility may not be a big enough difference for you to notice. The best thing you can do is just load it up and see how it performs and if your satisfied with the results.
  6. Agree
    Nayr438 got a reaction from Ashley xD in Why does everybody think OSX is so easy?   
    Not to mention the amount of outdated and lacking documentation provided by distros and the outdated information that tends to pop up in search results.
    The only distro with up to date and informative documentation is Arch and well you should know how new user unfriendly and cli oriented it is.
     
    Then if we add to that the confusion caused by varying package managers and repositories, and the ongoing battle between Flatpak and Snaps on top of these repositories.
    I am on KDE Neon currently, opening the software center and searching for say piper yields 3 results from 3 sources, with the only one including and activating the libratbagd service being the one from the standard repos. Then the lack of information about whats actually supported and not supported in these containerized packages, which actually does vary due to various limitations and/or limited packager/developer interest.
     
    Then we have the case where software X works on distro A but not distro B due to dependency reasons, or software X is only shipped compiled as a DEB but your on Manjaro.
    Then there is the varying out of the box hardware and proprietary support... or the varying desktop environments and applications.
    Make a poor choice and your first impression isn't great.
     
    These make Linux less new user friendly and make MacOS and Windows more appealing, they have one base and everything is just expected to work. MacOS adds to this simplicity by limiting hardware support and if I remember correctly a easily accessible software center. Considering your typical user is only concerned about using there set of applications and don't want to mess with the system, the need for having a highly customizable system isn't much of a priority, instead focusing on making the system as easy to use as possible by removing confusion, thus limiting your ability to alter the system. We also have to take into consideration what the user is used to, depending on which school I was in at the time we used either MacOS or Windows, if you become more familiar with one then you will have a hard time transitioning to another.
  7. Informative
    Nayr438 got a reaction from BBF in How does linus connect all his USB's to his pc?   
    In reference to the video above. The Elgato Thunderbolt™ 3 Dock over a thunderbolt optical cable.
     
    Though as of this video
     
    50ft DisplayPort Cable
    USB 3-2-1 Raven™ 3124 over a Multimode fiber cable.
  8. Like
    Nayr438 got a reaction from jazzguitar1440 in lm-sensors: How to tell what sensors-detect did??   
    When it probes unknown devices, it sends common raw commands to see what a detected component returns. When it does this, it can lockup the device, place it in weird sleep states that can usually be recovered by removing power from the board (including cmos battery), wipe onboard components, or even send bad voltages across the board. The risk is real and damage does occur more often than people probably realize. MSI boards (I just see this one popup often) and Laptops are probably the most problematic. However the risk factor of it actually coming to that is fairly low, especially on hardware that's been out awhile, but its something you should still take caution with.
     
     
  9. Agree
    Nayr438 got a reaction from TetraSky in Could this be it? FTC fines scalpers for using bots.   
    No. They are being fined under the "Better Online Ticket Sales (BOTS) Act" which only applies to Ticket Sales, not hardware sales.
  10. Like
    Nayr438 got a reaction from Alexproheadbang in Is Philips Hue still a RIPOFF?   
    Depends.
    Do you want a light system that tightly integrates with your Network and can be synced with near anything? Do you want to stick with a company that makes Smart Bulbs of varying sizes that others don't? Then no, as Phillips probably offers the best you can get in this area.
     
     
    Do you just want lights that can be controlled over WiFi? Then yes, though I probably wouldn't trust anything from Ikea. The biggest problems can be finding a bulb that produces the colors you want and offers varying bulb sizes for things such as ceiling fans.
  11. Like
    Nayr438 got a reaction from Lurick in Is Philips Hue still a RIPOFF?   
    Depends.
    Do you want a light system that tightly integrates with your Network and can be synced with near anything? Do you want to stick with a company that makes Smart Bulbs of varying sizes that others don't? Then no, as Phillips probably offers the best you can get in this area.
     
     
    Do you just want lights that can be controlled over WiFi? Then yes, though I probably wouldn't trust anything from Ikea. The biggest problems can be finding a bulb that produces the colors you want and offers varying bulb sizes for things such as ceiling fans.
  12. Agree
    Nayr438 got a reaction from sounds in lm-sensors: How to tell what sensors-detect did??   
    No, that would be entirely dependent on your cooling solution.
     
    I am not sure what that is, but a search tells me that its just the kernel complaining about ownership. It can probably be ignored.
    Adding "pcie_ports=dpc-native" to your kernel command-line may make that message disappear.
     
    This isn't an error, it can be ignored.
     
    Your missing the firmware file for your WiFi card. It's normally part of linux-firmware but your distro may be using a outdated pull.
     
    You can try pulling the latest collection with
    git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/firmware/linux-firmware.git cd linux-firmware sudo make install A kernel upgrade may or may not be necessary for full functionality however.
     
  13. Agree
    Nayr438 got a reaction from sounds in lm-sensors: How to tell what sensors-detect did??   
    If you accepted the defaults, your probably fine. It can be harmful when it starts probing unknown devices, as it just starts sending common raw commands. The simplest way to tell is to restart your system and see if anything has stopped working or if the kernel is spamming a hardware error. "dmesg | grep error".
  14. Agree
    Nayr438 got a reaction from Mitko_DSV in what is worse for the environment? consumerism or using older stuff...   
    Your older computer might consume more power, but you have to take into account the amount of power needed to build the new system, not to mention the other resources.
     
    We actually have a big problem where things are becoming more efficient once it reaches the consumer, but the process of manufacturing and transporting these items are increasing in environmental harm.
  15. Informative
    Nayr438 got a reaction from Wild Penquin in lm-sensors: How to tell what sensors-detect did??   
    When it probes unknown devices, it sends common raw commands to see what a detected component returns. When it does this, it can lockup the device, place it in weird sleep states that can usually be recovered by removing power from the board (including cmos battery), wipe onboard components, or even send bad voltages across the board. The risk is real and damage does occur more often than people probably realize. MSI boards (I just see this one popup often) and Laptops are probably the most problematic. However the risk factor of it actually coming to that is fairly low, especially on hardware that's been out awhile, but its something you should still take caution with.
     
     
  16. Like
    Nayr438 got a reaction from jazzguitar1440 in lm-sensors: How to tell what sensors-detect did??   
    No, that would be entirely dependent on your cooling solution.
     
    I am not sure what that is, but a search tells me that its just the kernel complaining about ownership. It can probably be ignored.
    Adding "pcie_ports=dpc-native" to your kernel command-line may make that message disappear.
     
    This isn't an error, it can be ignored.
     
    Your missing the firmware file for your WiFi card. It's normally part of linux-firmware but your distro may be using a outdated pull.
     
    You can try pulling the latest collection with
    git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/firmware/linux-firmware.git cd linux-firmware sudo make install A kernel upgrade may or may not be necessary for full functionality however.
     
  17. Like
    Nayr438 got a reaction from Ashley xD in what is worse for the environment? consumerism or using older stuff...   
    Your older computer might consume more power, but you have to take into account the amount of power needed to build the new system, not to mention the other resources.
     
    We actually have a big problem where things are becoming more efficient once it reaches the consumer, but the process of manufacturing and transporting these items are increasing in environmental harm.
  18. Agree
    Nayr438 got a reaction from elsandosgrande in lm-sensors: How to tell what sensors-detect did??   
    No, that would be entirely dependent on your cooling solution.
     
    I am not sure what that is, but a search tells me that its just the kernel complaining about ownership. It can probably be ignored.
    Adding "pcie_ports=dpc-native" to your kernel command-line may make that message disappear.
     
    This isn't an error, it can be ignored.
     
    Your missing the firmware file for your WiFi card. It's normally part of linux-firmware but your distro may be using a outdated pull.
     
    You can try pulling the latest collection with
    git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/firmware/linux-firmware.git cd linux-firmware sudo make install A kernel upgrade may or may not be necessary for full functionality however.
     
  19. Agree
    Nayr438 got a reaction from igormp in lm-sensors: How to tell what sensors-detect did??   
    If you accepted the defaults, your probably fine. It can be harmful when it starts probing unknown devices, as it just starts sending common raw commands. The simplest way to tell is to restart your system and see if anything has stopped working or if the kernel is spamming a hardware error. "dmesg | grep error".
  20. Like
    Nayr438 got a reaction from jazzguitar1440 in lm-sensors: How to tell what sensors-detect did??   
    If you accepted the defaults, your probably fine. It can be harmful when it starts probing unknown devices, as it just starts sending common raw commands. The simplest way to tell is to restart your system and see if anything has stopped working or if the kernel is spamming a hardware error. "dmesg | grep error".
  21. Agree
    Nayr438 got a reaction from kelvinhall05 in lm-sensors: How to tell what sensors-detect did??   
    If you accepted the defaults, your probably fine. It can be harmful when it starts probing unknown devices, as it just starts sending common raw commands. The simplest way to tell is to restart your system and see if anything has stopped working or if the kernel is spamming a hardware error. "dmesg | grep error".
  22. Like
    Nayr438 got a reaction from Electronics Wizardy in Is it possible to update an operating system in the background?   
    There is Kernel live patching.
    https://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/livepatch/livepatch.txt
     
    Which is based on these projects.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ksplice
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KGraft
     
     
    For applications, it depends on whats active and whats been updated. You have to restart processes from the bottom of the stack upwards. However projects like Fedora Silverblue and Fedora CoreOS are working on ways to update in real time with minimal to no downtime in application usage by utilizing a minimal core and containerized packages. Ubuntu has been working on and pushing for something similar as well.
     
     
  23. Agree
    Nayr438 got a reaction from linuxChips2600 in Nvidia Drivers Issues on Linux   
    The real issue in my opinion comes down to this.
    NVIDIA drivers are proprietary and they don't like to share information.
    NVIDIA's config is a mess, especially with the introduction of wayland. They also seem to refuse to adapt new practices for handling xorg configs, which can cause issues with xorg in some instances.
    NVIDIA's drivers target Ubuntu and RedHat, they are only guaranteed to work against the packages shipped on these distros, which are considered heavily outdated by others.
    If the Linux community comes up with a implementation, NVIDIA tries to complicate it by introducing there own closed source version and not adopting the open-source implementation.
    Most developers primarily target the Mesa 3d Graphics Library, which is part of the open-source driver stack for Intel and AMD.
     
    When it comes to the open-source driver stack, when a problem arises, the Linux community can fix it.
    Some patches with various applications go hand in hand with additional patches to the open-source driver stack, they can be built and tested at the same time.
    A good example is the introduction of the RADV ACO compiler for AMD, it was actually made by valve and merged into Mesa.
     
    For target distros such as Ubuntu, RedHat and there derivitives such as Mint, PopOS!, etc..., its fairly unlikely so long as you don't try to modify the configs NVIDIA Generates.
    As you move towards something like Arch, issues like that can and do creep up from time to time.
  24. Agree
    Nayr438 got a reaction from tryton-vanmeer in Does anyone know if this is going to be a normal Windows 10 version functioning properly and 64 bit?   
    All it will give you is a key, a string of numbers and letters. It will either work or it wont, with the possibility that it may be de-activated at any time.
    Windows will come from Microsoft's Website.
  25. Informative
    Nayr438 got a reaction from Stravitch in Game Server Distro Questions   
    The Linux builds of ARK are often broken and late to update. Running a ARK Server on a Linux host could mean the server going down for a month at a time. It would be more worthwhile to run a Windows Server in this instance. For a optimal server instance, you need a quad core cpu and 8GB of ram, your specs will more than be enough for a single instance with the capability to run 2 instances at once.
     
    For 7Days and Minecraft, you would be fine for those 4-6 people.
     
    My recommendation is still going to be a Windows Server, however if you really want to go with Linux, Ubuntu Minimal with Firewalld is a good bet considering that's usually the target distro for Steam and Linux Game Servers.
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