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madknight3

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  1. Informative
    madknight3 got a reaction from MatazaNZ in Decided to learn Scala   
    If you're comfortable learning the syntax and libraries as you go then perhaps you'll want to focus more on learning the functional paradigm. If you're new to functional programming, it has it's own way of doing things when compared to the Object Oriented paradigm and it can take a while to adjust to the new way of thinking.
     
    I don't know if "Scala for the Impatient" covers functional programming well or not as I haven't read it. Based on the table of contents, it seems like it certainly covers a lot of things, including some functional aspects of Scala, so it might but I can't confirm.
     
    I've heard that "Functional Programming in Scala" is a really good book for learning functional programming although again I haven't read it myself so I can't confirm.
     
    I'm not aware of any "build x in scala" type tutorials, I'm sure they are out there if you search around enough but there's no guarantee they will be good. You might be better off picking out your own projects to build and then asking Scala devs for advice on improvements.
     
    In terms of coding style, you can google for things like "Scala best practices" and see what people have to say. A couple examples are
    Twitter's Best Practices doc Another Open Source Best Practices list
  2. Agree
    madknight3 got a reaction from angelmartin11 in Stuck on something "simple"   
    Many programming competition problems use text files for input. When they require a 2d array as the input, some of them use a format where the first line is the number of rows and columns, and the remaining lines are the values in the matrix. Here are two examples. The first of a 3x3 matrix, and the second of a 5x5 matrix.
    3 3 1 1 1 0 0 0 4 4 4 5 5 10 -2 3 4 199 7 2 -32 5 -12 32 32 -4 8 -499 0 3 1 4 2 1092 3 5 34 -3  
    You could require a user enter the information in this kind of format in a multi-line edit text box.
  3. Like
    madknight3 got a reaction from AluminiumTech in C# Beginner: Best to use Convert.ToInt32 or int.parse   
    When it comes to strings, Convert.ToInt32 and int.Parse pretty much do the same thing, except when it's trying to convert a null string. In that case, Convert.ToInt32 will return 0 and int.Parse will throw an exception.
     
    When you look at the code for Convert.ToInt32, you'll see that it ends up calling int.Parse after the null check.
    public static int ToInt32(string value) { if (value == null) { return 0; } return int.Parse(value, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture); }  
    One thing to note is that Convert.ToInt32 can also handle other types while int.Parse can only handle strings.
  4. Agree
    madknight3 got a reaction from Nuluvius in [C#] Where to begin?   
    Like the above recommendations, I also recommend the following
    This is where I would probably start as it's free and you can save your free trial to Pluralsight for a little more interesting material.
     
    I'm not familiar with the other Bob Tabor courses but they may be good as well.
    Note that normally this is about $30 a month, or $300 a year, but you can get 3 free months if you sign up for the Visual Studio Dev Essentials program, which is free and you need it for Visual Studio Community anyway.
     
    If you go with Pluralsight, I recommend you check out the C# Path which gives you a set of courses to go through from beginner to advanced. They aren't the only good C# courses though but it can be nice to have a path to follow. The benefit of a site like Pluralsight is they provide you with a huge library of courses to choose from on many different topics that are useful to you as a software developer.
  5. Informative
    madknight3 got a reaction from IAmAndre in 48 hours to learn Python   
    I see that a bunch of people have linked beginner tutorials (mostly video/interactive stuff). While they are normally not a bad way to go, you're also not a beginner and I think they may be a little slow for your current needs. You can probably skim through written stuff faster, especially for picking up the basics (syntax and some commonly used libraries). Things like this
    Learnxinyminutes (python 3) gives a quick overview of the syntax although it's not very organized (python 2 here). You can google for "Python 2 cheat sheet" or "Python 3 cheat sheet" and look through those for quick overviews and references. You can look though a pocket reference like this (this specific book has both python 2 and 3) The Python documentation is also always useful  
    In terms of data science stuff, I don't know if I can help much there as it's not an area I'm very familiar with. I believe it commonly uses the scipy packages but you might want to double check in case I'm wrong. There seem to be a fair number of data science courses in python that you could check out (google "data science in python").
  6. Informative
    madknight3 got a reaction from ZaTrox in C#/ C Sharp - where to start   
    If you like learning from video courses, here are two links for you to check out.
    MVA: C# Fundamentals for Absolute Beginners - Free, one course Pluralsight - Monthly cost, many courses on C#, Unity and other programming related things (languages, frameworks, tools, techniques, etc) for beginners to advanced developers You can get multiple months for free by joining the free Visual Studio Dev Essentials program (you may have already done so for VS 2015 Community)  
    OOP (Object Oriented Programming)
    DRY (Don't Repeat Yourself)
    KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid)
  7. Agree
    madknight3 got a reaction from vorticalbox in C++ vs C# for Beginner software developer   
    Why C++ or C#? There's certainly nothing wrong with either language, I'm just curious how you narrowed all the languages down to those two.
  8. Agree
    madknight3 got a reaction from Kaffedreng in Would you use this app?   
    Personally, I would want descriptions of the meal to go along with the image.
  9. Agree
    madknight3 got a reaction from dannytech357 in Collabritive Coding Tool   
    You could use an online IDE like Cloud9
  10. Agree
    madknight3 got a reaction from Remixt in Would you use this app?   
    Personally, I would want descriptions of the meal to go along with the image.
  11. Agree
    madknight3 got a reaction from mikat in Would you use this app?   
    Personally, I would want descriptions of the meal to go along with the image.
  12. Agree
    madknight3 got a reaction from AluminiumTech in Would you use this app?   
    Personally, I would want descriptions of the meal to go along with the image.
  13. Agree
    madknight3 got a reaction from mathijs727 in Collabritive Coding Tool   
    You could use an online IDE like Cloud9
  14. Agree
    madknight3 got a reaction from SecGuy in Collabritive Coding Tool   
    You could use an online IDE like Cloud9
  15. Like
    madknight3 reacted to Wiizimov in I dun goofed, only checked my University email last week, and now this D:   
    I managed to finish it all! Did a 90 minute workshop with a tutor to get me used to the program, and yes that was the issue haha the button was set to disabled by default.
    Thank you anyway!
  16. Agree
    madknight3 got a reaction from jslowik in Best Python IDE   
    PyCharm is a great Python IDE
  17. Like
    madknight3 reacted to paps511 in Python Code Scraping   
    Hey all,
     
    A few months ago I was very active in this section asking about python code scraping with the Kiva api and a ton of other things.
     
    I finally got around to publishing the paper I wrote for the class. Published on linkedin, but published none the less!
     
    You can read it here if you are interested.
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/big-data-analysis-kivaorg-ryan-papera
     
    Thank you all who helped guide me.
    @Azgoth 2@riklaunim@Enderman@Nineshadow
  18. Agree
    madknight3 got a reaction from Nicholatian in Best Python IDE   
    I wish my IDE could make me pancakes!
  19. Like
    madknight3 got a reaction from thor77 in Joy of Coding Humble Bundle   
    Hey,
     
    Came across The Joy of Coding Humble Bundle today on Reddit and figured I'd share in case anyone was interested. I'm not familiar with all of the books but I know a few come highly recommended. Feel free to browse the Reddit thread for opinions, look up reviews, discuss here, etc.
     
    Disclaimer: I'm not affiliated with them in any way. I'm not sure if this violates the community standards or not. If it does, I apologize. I searched the forum and found a few posts that mentioned other humble bundles and they weren't closed down.
     
    Here's the list of books
    Note that some of these books are already free online in case you'd rather go with that option. Here are the links of those I know about (I'll update if there's any I missed).
     
  20. Informative
    madknight3 got a reaction from Cubie137 in Code Execution   
    It's great that you want to learn multiple languages, every programmer should eventually do so. However, I would recommend you pick one of them to focus on for now. Trying to learn three languages at once can be a lot for a beginner.
     
    If you're specifically interested in web development then it's fine to stick with JavaScript. If not, I think Python or C# is a better option to focus on.
     
    JavaScript is primarily used for client side web development (ie: what you've been doing) but JavaScript can be used in other ways. For example, you can use it for server side web development with Node.js (note that you can also use Python, C#, and many other languages for server side web development too).
     
    You can also use JavaScript for building desktop (example) and mobile (example) apps but I would avoid those for now. Stick with web development when learning JavaScript. Like I said, if you aren't that interested in web development right now, then I would drop JavaScript for something else.
     
    Sure. The best place to start is with a good beginner tutorial. They will usually take you through installing the language/tools needed, show you how to write/run your first bit of code, and then start teaching you the basics of the language.
     
    If you want to go ahead with Python, check out the free online book Automate The Boring Stuff. The book is accompanied by a set of YouTube videos as well which are linked to throughout the book.
     
    If you want to go ahead with C#, check out the free video course C# Fundamentals for Absolute Beginners.
  21. Like
    madknight3 got a reaction from straight_stewie in Best Python IDE   
    PyCharm is a great Python IDE
  22. Like
    madknight3 got a reaction from fizzlesticks in Joy of Coding Humble Bundle   
    Hey,
     
    Came across The Joy of Coding Humble Bundle today on Reddit and figured I'd share in case anyone was interested. I'm not familiar with all of the books but I know a few come highly recommended. Feel free to browse the Reddit thread for opinions, look up reviews, discuss here, etc.
     
    Disclaimer: I'm not affiliated with them in any way. I'm not sure if this violates the community standards or not. If it does, I apologize. I searched the forum and found a few posts that mentioned other humble bundles and they weren't closed down.
     
    Here's the list of books
    Note that some of these books are already free online in case you'd rather go with that option. Here are the links of those I know about (I'll update if there's any I missed).
     
  23. Agree
    madknight3 got a reaction from fizzlesticks in Best Python IDE   
    PyCharm is a great Python IDE
  24. Agree
    madknight3 got a reaction from Beskamir in Best Python IDE   
    PyCharm is a great Python IDE
  25. Agree
    madknight3 got a reaction from vorticalbox in Billing SYstem   
    Start by making a list of requirements. List and describe all the functionality that this project needs so that you know what needs to be done and how it's all supposed to work.
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