Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Spotty

Moderator
  • Content Count

    8,981
  • Joined

Awards

About Spotty

  • Title
    Veteran

Profile Information

  • Location
    Australia

System

  • CPU
    i7 6700k
  • Motherboard
    Gigabyte Z170 Gaming 5
  • RAM
    32GB (2x16GB) Corsair Vengeance LPX 3000MHz
  • GPU
    Gigabyte GTX 1080ti Aorus Xtreme Edition
  • Case
    BeQuiet Silent Base 800
  • Storage
    Samsung 970 Evo 500GB
    Samsung 840 Evo 500GB
    Crucial MX500 2TB
    2x Seagate Ironwolf 6TB
    Seagate Ironwolf 8TB
  • PSU
    Corsair RM750x (2018)
  • Display(s)
    Acer Predactor XB271HU (IPS Panel 2560x1440@144hz)
    Samsung SyncMaster BX2450 (1920x1080@60hz)
  • Cooling
    Corsiar H100i GTX
  • Keyboard
    Corsair K70 RGB (Mk.1) w/ Cherry MX Brown switches
  • Mouse
    Logitech MX518
  • Sound
    Logitech Z506 5.1
    Razer Tiamat 7.1 (v1) [Broken mic]
    Plantronics RIG 500E
    Neewer NW-700
    Steinberg UR-12
  • Operating System
    Windows 10

Recent Profile Visitors

22,941 profile views
  1. What sparked these questions from @Moonzy was the recent video from gamers Nexus testing the nzxt H1 case catching fire. They concluded SCP didn't trip because there was enough resistance from the motherboard tray and chassis between the short and the power supply. Also supported by when they connected the faulty PCIe riser directly to the enclosure of the PSU grounding it, the SCP did kick in to shut it down. That would maybe be a good example of when SCP doesn't trip and you would want OCP. I have no idea what the current draw was so no idea if having
  2. Hey, Den... Any chance you could throw up a solid green image on that TV and retake that photo. It's for science
  3. Could they though?... This proposed law actually prevents that. Companies/services designated as digital platforms cannot discriminate against news companies based on whether or not they engage in a bargaining agreement (agreement to pay for links). (That's my personal summary and interpretation, the original proposal is linked in my previous post if you want to read it yourself. Division 5 - non differentiation) Google couldn't block news outlets from showing up in the results if Google doesn't want to meet their demands and pay as they would be discrim
  4. Didn't Mythbusters test this?
  5. https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/power-supplies-101,4193-21.html There's explanations for the rest of the protections found in PSUs included in that article on Tom's Hardware if you want to read up on the rest.
  6. I think you meant Short Circuit Protection (SCP), not Over Current Protection (OCP). The PSU doesn't sense the short because there's enough resistance provided by the case/motherboard tray. The NZXT S650 is exclusive to the H1 case so there's not a lot of information out there on it, but it's manufactured by Seasonic for NZXT and is very likely just a rebrand of the Seasonic Focus SGX 650W. It even has the same fan grill. According to this Tom's Hardware review OCP wouldn't trip until around 65A, which as you saw from the consequences in the video is probably not helpful in this scenario
  7. The super short, super simplified TLDR version for anyone who doesn't know what the proposed law does... Google will be required to provide news companies with information on its users, how its users interact with the site in relation to their content. Google will be required to provide news companies with details of how its search and ranking algorithms work, and provide notice of any changes to the algorithms that will affect news companies. (Currently this excludes anything that will be considered "Trade Secrets" that could damage Google's position in the market, but NewsCorp
  8. I set out to simply explain the proposed Australian "link tax" and ended up writing a 1300 word essay. Woops. Time to start over.

     

    The super short, super simplified TLDR version for anyone who doesn't know what the proposed law does...

    • Google will be required to provide news companies with information on its users, how its users interact with the site in relation to their content.
    • Google will be required to provide news companies with details of how its search and ranking algorithms work, and provide notice of any changes to the algorithms that will affect news companies. (Currently this excludes anything that will be considered "Trade Secrets" that could damage Google's position in the market, but NewsCorp is petitioning for that exemption to be removed)
    • Google will be required to pay media companies to host their content. The definition of "content" includes displaying a LINK to a news website.
    • ... This doesn't just apply to Google. This applies to any "Designated Digital Platforms", which has no definition or requirements within the law. The Government chooses which companies are deemed "Designated Digital Platforms" and in effect means they choose which companies they want this law to apply to. This means that laws that apply to Google might not apply to its direct competitors such as Bing or DuckDuckGo.

     

    This is why Google has threatened it would have no option but to pull its Google Search services out of the Australian market if the law is passed.

    1.   Show previous replies  7 more
    2. AluminiumTech

      AluminiumTech

      17 minutes ago, Spotty said:

      EU laws do not apply to Australia.

      Despite it being referred to as a "link tax", didn't the EU law only have to do with Google publishing extracts from the articles (a portion of their content), not links?

      Something like that but my understanding is that Google and other search engines wouldn’t be able to provide link previews for anything.

    3. Spotty

      Spotty

      Just now, AluminiumTech said:

      Something like that but my understanding is that Google and other search engines wouldn’t be able to provide link previews for anything.

      That's because link previews contain content from the source article.

       

      The Australian law would make the link, www.example.com, considered content and will require Google and others to pay the media companies if they provide a link to their website.

      While Google could easily remove previews from European search results they can't just remove links from Google search results without completely breaking its functionality.

       

      From Sir Tim Berners-Lee submission in response to the proposed law:

      Quote

      As I understand it, the proposed code seeks to require selected digital platforms to have to negotiate and possibly pay to make links to news content from a particular group of news providers. Requiring a charge for a link on the web blocks an important aspect of the value of web content. To my knowledge, there is no current example of legally requiring payments for links to other content. The ability to link freely -- meaning without limitations regarding the content of the linked site and without monetary fees -- is fundamental to how the web operates, how it has flourished till present, and how it will continue to grow in decades to come.
      ...

      I firmly believe that constraints on the use of hypertext links are not the correct way to achieve this goal. It would undermine the fundamental principle of the ability to link freely on the web, and is inconsistent with how the web has been able to operate over the past three decades. If this precedent were followed elsewhere it could make the web unworkable around the world.

       

    4. Letgomyleghoe

      Letgomyleghoe

      this all just seems absurdly ridiculous, googles not profiting off those snidbits of information under a link, they aren't viewing adds while reading those snidbits trying to find something. 

      They're basically making google pay a company that they're providing publicity/advertising to, this makes absolutely 0 sense.

  9. The LTT Discord is currently not accepting new members.
  10. With the old status update is it wouldn't show the full list of comments. It would only show the most recent 3 comments at a time. If there was a status update with several replies it was extremely tedious to click "Show more" many times to be able to view the full discussion.
  11. It's a text post. If you click on it you will be taken to the post, which is a message explaining why there haven't been as many uploads to Floatplane recently.
  12. Who says this proposed law won't also apply to Bing? You can't write laws that target a specific company, though it sure seems like they're trying... The proposal is extremely vague on what companies will be affected by this. We know Facebook and Google as that's who they're targeting, but it's certainly not limited to them. It's any company that is a "designated digital platform". What is a "designated digital platform"? There's no guidelines to define it. The proposal only states that it's up to the (communications?) Minister to decide which companies are designated digital platf
  13. The difference between the Australian proposal and what happened in France is the proposed law in Australia applies to links, not snippets from the article. If someone google searches "news" and Google search shows www.news.com in its search results Google would have to pay the website. https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r6652 Currently, one of the most basic underlying principles of the web is there is no cost involved in creating a hypertext link (or simply a “link”) to any other page or object
  14. You'll probably want more than 1000w PSU for four graphics cards, especially with a 3090 in the mix. With $3000 worth of graphics cards I'd be looking at an AX1600i. Or at least the HX1200.
×