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WereCatf

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About WereCatf

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    Somewhere between kitchen, bed and my PC.
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    Female
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    PornHu...oh, wait.
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    Eh.

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  1. There don't seem to be particularly many people here who are into actual hobby electronics and I haven't seen anyone else mention anything about it, but...I am *totes* excited about Espressif's upcoming ESP32-C3! RISC-V + WiFi, with Espressif's popular and pretty good SDK? Yes, please!

    excite.gif.a5ac045c084fb9b2706e88f2b6bedad2.gif

    1. Show previous comments  2 more
    2. WereCatf

      WereCatf

      @LetgomyleghoeBetter? For what? MCUs and SoCs are meant for entirely different kinds of tasks, so comparing ESP32's to Raspberry Pis misses the point entirely. It'd be like comparing a race-car to one of those massive dump trucks -- while both can technically drive on the same road, one is meant go fast and react quickly, the other is meant to do a ton of work.

    3. Letgomyleghoe

      Letgomyleghoe

      idk i was just asking a question, i know Jack about hobby electronics

    4. WereCatf

      WereCatf

      @LetgomyleghoeWell, okay. MCUs are good for all sorts of sensors, driving motors and in general tasks where you want millisecond or even microseconds response-times to events. MCUs are all about very tight control over every aspect of the software running on it and doing it extremely efficiently. SoCs in devices like Raspberry Pis are really more for running more complex software, like e.g. routers, media-players, low-end laptops.

       

      Just as a quick example, I have a small sensor in the basement monitoring temperature and humidity and reporting the values over a long-range, low-speed radio-system called LoRa. The sensor spends extremely little time in collecting the info it needs and sending it off, before going to sleep, and thus it last about 1.5 years on a single charge of its battery. With an RPi Zero or something, I'd maybe get a week of runtime doing the same thing.

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