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minervx

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  1. Like
    minervx got a reaction from Origami Cactus in FYI Before You Buy a AMD Ryzen Laptop   
    1) Check whether the RAM is single or dual channel.  Dual channel is preferable for Ryzen.
     
    2) Ryzen 7's, in many cases, perform only very slightly better than Ryzen 5's, because they are used in the same chassis's and have to either be undervolted or throttled to maintain the same thermals.  Especially if it's a light and thin laptop, the Ryzen 7's potential will likely not be met.  It may not worth paying substantially more money for a Ryzen 7.
  2. Like
    minervx got a reaction from Derkoli in Beginner's Guide to Buying a Microphone   
    XLR vs. USB
    It's kind of like the DIY PC vs. prebuilt Walmart PC comparison.  With the XLR, you're going for more customizability, upgradability, versatility and long-term lifespan.  From a "buy it for life" perspective, XLR is a superior investment.  Although, USB may have the advantage of price and convenience.  For those who cannot spend more than $50-60, maybe getting a USB like the Behringer C1-U could be their best option.  However, spending $100+ on a USB mic makes less sense because at that point, an XLR setup is affordable.
     
    Accessories
    For an XLR mic, an XLR cable and an audio interface is needed.  The Audio interfaces comes with the cable needed to attach to the computer.  A pop filter or wind screen is recommended to block plosives from "P"/"B" sounds.  A cheap pop filter is fine; they all do the same thing; with expensive ones, you're often just paying for a better quality neck and/or a brand name.  The wind screen is more portable and convenience, so it may be a more preferred option for more people.  Make sure it's wide enough to fit the head of the mic.  If you can't acquire either for whatever reason, maybe use a sock. For the mic stand, it's up to preference.  A desk mic stand may be preferable to a large one on the floor, if you don't plan on taking it to events or anything like that.  Tripods can fold easily and are more portable, though round-base metal plate may be more stable.  A boom arm that screws to the desk is an option.   A shock mount may be helpful if mic vibrations are a problem.  Make sure it's not too wide for skinny mics, or too small for big mics; pictures on Amazon reviews can help gauge the size.  Acoustic treatment is strongly recommended.  If you don't have it, use pillows and blankets. Cost
    Microphones are not like CPU's where the i7 is more powerful than the i5.  A $200 mic is not necessarily better than a $100 mic.  Going super cheap on a mic will sacrifice quality, but once we get into the $50-100+ price range, there starts to be a law of diminishing returns.  It's like wine or fashion.  Does a $1000 bottle of wine taste better than a $200 or $50 bottle of wine?  
     
    The biggest mistake I see beginners to audio make is spend their whole budget on the mic and interface and none on improving their environment.  A Blue Snowball in a studio recording room is going to sound better than a Neumann U87 in a typical office or bedroom.  Expensive mics are fine for studios who already have the basic fundamentals down, but for a beginner, it's probably a better idea to buy a good $60 MXL V67G  w/ $140 of acoustic foam panels than to buy a $200 Rode NT1A. 
     
    Audio Interface
    Technology improved a lot in the past 20 years.  In the past, people needed to spend a lot of money to get a good interface.  But nowadays, budget options are fine and they all basically do the same thing.  Hence, it's a better idea to get a $40 Behringer UM2 than a $100-200+ Focusrite.
     
    Polar Pattern
    For most uses, Cardioid is the best.  If your mic has multi patterns, set it to Cardioid.  It captures audio mostly from the intended source the capsule is facing and rejects a lot of background noise.  Bidirectional and Omnidirectional will pick up more background noise.
     
    Dynamic vs. Condenser
    The pros of Dynamics: More durable, resistant to physical damage and moisture, making them superior for live events.  More options (than Condenser) in the <$50 price range. The cons of a Dynamic: They generally require a lot more gain to get the same volume output as a Condenser.   (Buying an additional pre-amp just to get the same thing as a Condenser provides without needing one is an unnecessary cost).  Dynamics generally pick up a more limited range of frequencies compared to Condensers, often rolling off shortly after 10KHz  Neither Dynamics nor Condensers necessarily sound inherently better.  There are great mics for both Condenser and Dynamic.  Condenser's wider range of frequencies makes it a better option for home and studio environments in my option, but it's up to personal preference.  
    Background Noise
    Beyond polar pattern, the differences in background noise rejection between different mics isn't significant.  Rather than searching for a mic that picks up less background noise, it's more constructive to work on recording environment and recording technique because those will make more a difference.  Buying a Dynamic microphone isn't a fix for background noise; it'll pick up less volume, but once the gain is boosted to an appropriate amount, the noise will be amplified too.  Mics are designed to pick up noise and have no way to distinguish what noise you intend vs. what noise you don't intend for it to capture. 
     
    Online Reviews
    There are Youtube videos of mic reviews, but make sure the reviewer is using proper mic technique.  There are a lot of Youtubers who do not understand proper mic technique.  They speak too close to the mic, or they're not facing the capsule properly, or they're not using a pop filter or they're recording next to a wall in an untreated bedroom.  Also, it can be misleading to judge background noise rejection from a Youtube review.  If their output volume is low, it may deceivingly appear like it's rejecting background noise.  If their output volume is high, or they're in a noisy environment or they have terrible mic placement/technique, a mic could deceivingly appear like it picks up more noise.  Also, when possible, listen to blind mic comparisons.  Brand names, prices, marketing and aesthetic qualities could influence pre-concieved biases.
     
    Frequency Response
    On websites like recording-hacks.com, there are graphs that show the tonality of the microphone (from left/low frequencies to right/high frequencies).  Horizontally are what frequencies you get, and vertically is how much of each frequency you get.  Using metrics like this to describe the tone is a lot more precise than using vague words like 'warm', 'soothing', 'luxurious'. 
     
    TLDR
    If you have a very tight budget, find a Behringer C-1U on ebay.
    If you have $120 or so, MXL V67G + Behringer UM2 + Amazonbasics XLR cable + cheap wind screen + an affordable mic stand.
  3. Like
    minervx got a reaction from rice guru in Beginner's Guide to Buying a Microphone   
    XLR vs. USB
    It's kind of like the DIY PC vs. prebuilt Walmart PC comparison.  With the XLR, you're going for more customizability, upgradability, versatility and long-term lifespan.  From a "buy it for life" perspective, XLR is a superior investment.  Although, USB may have the advantage of price and convenience.  For those who cannot spend more than $50-60, maybe getting a USB like the Behringer C1-U could be their best option.  However, spending $100+ on a USB mic makes less sense because at that point, an XLR setup is affordable.
     
    Accessories
    For an XLR mic, an XLR cable and an audio interface is needed.  The Audio interfaces comes with the cable needed to attach to the computer.  A pop filter or wind screen is recommended to block plosives from "P"/"B" sounds.  A cheap pop filter is fine; they all do the same thing; with expensive ones, you're often just paying for a better quality neck and/or a brand name.  The wind screen is more portable and convenience, so it may be a more preferred option for more people.  Make sure it's wide enough to fit the head of the mic.  If you can't acquire either for whatever reason, maybe use a sock. For the mic stand, it's up to preference.  A desk mic stand may be preferable to a large one on the floor, if you don't plan on taking it to events or anything like that.  Tripods can fold easily and are more portable, though round-base metal plate may be more stable.  A boom arm that screws to the desk is an option.   A shock mount may be helpful if mic vibrations are a problem.  Make sure it's not too wide for skinny mics, or too small for big mics; pictures on Amazon reviews can help gauge the size.  Acoustic treatment is strongly recommended.  If you don't have it, use pillows and blankets. Cost
    Microphones are not like CPU's where the i7 is more powerful than the i5.  A $200 mic is not necessarily better than a $100 mic.  Going super cheap on a mic will sacrifice quality, but once we get into the $50-100+ price range, there starts to be a law of diminishing returns.  It's like wine or fashion.  Does a $1000 bottle of wine taste better than a $200 or $50 bottle of wine?  
     
    The biggest mistake I see beginners to audio make is spend their whole budget on the mic and interface and none on improving their environment.  A Blue Snowball in a studio recording room is going to sound better than a Neumann U87 in a typical office or bedroom.  Expensive mics are fine for studios who already have the basic fundamentals down, but for a beginner, it's probably a better idea to buy a good $60 MXL V67G  w/ $140 of acoustic foam panels than to buy a $200 Rode NT1A. 
     
    Audio Interface
    Technology improved a lot in the past 20 years.  In the past, people needed to spend a lot of money to get a good interface.  But nowadays, budget options are fine and they all basically do the same thing.  Hence, it's a better idea to get a $40 Behringer UM2 than a $100-200+ Focusrite.
     
    Polar Pattern
    For most uses, Cardioid is the best.  If your mic has multi patterns, set it to Cardioid.  It captures audio mostly from the intended source the capsule is facing and rejects a lot of background noise.  Bidirectional and Omnidirectional will pick up more background noise.
     
    Dynamic vs. Condenser
    The pros of Dynamics: More durable, resistant to physical damage and moisture, making them superior for live events.  More options (than Condenser) in the <$50 price range. The cons of a Dynamic: They generally require a lot more gain to get the same volume output as a Condenser.   (Buying an additional pre-amp just to get the same thing as a Condenser provides without needing one is an unnecessary cost).  Dynamics generally pick up a more limited range of frequencies compared to Condensers, often rolling off shortly after 10KHz  Neither Dynamics nor Condensers necessarily sound inherently better.  There are great mics for both Condenser and Dynamic.  Condenser's wider range of frequencies makes it a better option for home and studio environments in my option, but it's up to personal preference.  
    Background Noise
    Beyond polar pattern, the differences in background noise rejection between different mics isn't significant.  Rather than searching for a mic that picks up less background noise, it's more constructive to work on recording environment and recording technique because those will make more a difference.  Buying a Dynamic microphone isn't a fix for background noise; it'll pick up less volume, but once the gain is boosted to an appropriate amount, the noise will be amplified too.  Mics are designed to pick up noise and have no way to distinguish what noise you intend vs. what noise you don't intend for it to capture. 
     
    Online Reviews
    There are Youtube videos of mic reviews, but make sure the reviewer is using proper mic technique.  There are a lot of Youtubers who do not understand proper mic technique.  They speak too close to the mic, or they're not facing the capsule properly, or they're not using a pop filter or they're recording next to a wall in an untreated bedroom.  Also, it can be misleading to judge background noise rejection from a Youtube review.  If their output volume is low, it may deceivingly appear like it's rejecting background noise.  If their output volume is high, or they're in a noisy environment or they have terrible mic placement/technique, a mic could deceivingly appear like it picks up more noise.  Also, when possible, listen to blind mic comparisons.  Brand names, prices, marketing and aesthetic qualities could influence pre-concieved biases.
     
    Frequency Response
    On websites like recording-hacks.com, there are graphs that show the tonality of the microphone (from left/low frequencies to right/high frequencies).  Horizontally are what frequencies you get, and vertically is how much of each frequency you get.  Using metrics like this to describe the tone is a lot more precise than using vague words like 'warm', 'soothing', 'luxurious'. 
     
    TLDR
    If you have a very tight budget, find a Behringer C-1U on ebay.
    If you have $120 or so, MXL V67G + Behringer UM2 + Amazonbasics XLR cable + cheap wind screen + an affordable mic stand.
  4. Funny
    minervx got a reaction from JabroniBaloney in How to improve your recording quality   
    Speak at an appropriate distance (3"-8"). Keep your mic at least at least a few feet away from a wall or corner.  The capsule of the mic should face your mouth directly Use foam acoustic treatment panels to reduce wall reflections. (Pillow or blankets as an alternative) Stay still while speaking ; don't move or sway too much. Use a wind screen or pop filter to block plosives. If mic vibrations are a problem, use a shock mount. Processing the vocals with plugins like High-Pass Filter, Expander, Compressor and maybe a De-Esser can help.  REAPER is a free to evaluate DAW.  REAPER also has Reaplugs (free plugins that work with OBS).  And with VB-Audio Cable, vocals can be sent through the DAW, into the cable, and into your audio input.
     
    Also, buying a dynamic mic instead of a condenser will NOT reduce background noise. 
     
    And, in most cases, buying a new interface or pre-amp will NOT improve sound quality. Many people new into audio think the problem with their recordings is that they need to buy more expensive gear but the truth is that their recording technique needs a lot of work, and they're not properly setting up their recording environment. 
     
  5. Agree
    minervx got a reaction from Konrad_K in The current laptop market emphasizes flair over functionality   
    I agree, but it's not even just Apple.  There are lot of the windows Ultrabooks trying to compete with the Macbook (like the surface laptops, Acer Swift, Asus Zenbook/Vivobook, even Dell XPS that are using a tiny chassis with very little ventilation.  Some of these laptops advertise the good specs for their price whereas others focus their budget on aesthetics and get Youtubers to market them.  But nonetheless, the build quality is sacrificed.
     
    Also, the gaming laptops.  RGB lighting, aesthetics and marketing drive up the price, but again there's a question of thermals.  When I see recommendations for Razer's laptops, I honestly think that people really only expose themselves to the most marketed laptops and don't really don't know much about mobile hardware.
  6. Agree
    minervx got a reaction from Konrad_K in The current laptop market emphasizes flair over functionality   
    i think this is a topic worth talking about, because while a lot of the online tech community has sound recommendations for desktop builds, the laptop recommendations are kind of questionable. 
     
    There are a lot of factors which have nothing to do with the quality of the laptop itself. 
     First, the marketing: whichever company sends its products to a higher quantity of famous Youtubers is going to get more press and sales.    Second, laptops put a big emphasis on aesthetics.  They often want to look like Macbooks, RGB lighting, edgy gamer battlestation chassis.  Often absent, in many articles and Youtube videos which recommend laptops are the less glamorous but still great quality laptops (such as the ones designed for business).  Third, many of the heavily marketed laptops have barely any ventilation, which results in high temps and throttling; a reduction in performance.  While an aluminum chassis can act as some sort of heatsink, it's often not enough to forgo vents entirely.  Some of the laptops may not be able to fully attain what one would expect them to.  This also risks long-term functionality.  Fourth, there are quality control issues, especially in the low to mid range laptops.  Even though, on paper, the better specs for the price is a big factor, failure rate also comes into question.    
     
  7. Like
    minervx got a reaction from ------------- in The current laptop market emphasizes flair over functionality   
    i think this is a topic worth talking about, because while a lot of the online tech community has sound recommendations for desktop builds, the laptop recommendations are kind of questionable. 
     
    There are a lot of factors which have nothing to do with the quality of the laptop itself. 
     First, the marketing: whichever company sends its products to a higher quantity of famous Youtubers is going to get more press and sales.    Second, laptops put a big emphasis on aesthetics.  They often want to look like Macbooks, RGB lighting, edgy gamer battlestation chassis.  Often absent, in many articles and Youtube videos which recommend laptops are the less glamorous but still great quality laptops (such as the ones designed for business).  Third, many of the heavily marketed laptops have barely any ventilation, which results in high temps and throttling; a reduction in performance.  While an aluminum chassis can act as some sort of heatsink, it's often not enough to forgo vents entirely.  Some of the laptops may not be able to fully attain what one would expect them to.  This also risks long-term functionality.  Fourth, there are quality control issues, especially in the low to mid range laptops.  Even though, on paper, the better specs for the price is a big factor, failure rate also comes into question.    
     
  8. Like
    minervx got a reaction from ------------- in 10 Tips for Beginners Assembling Their First PC   
    1) Watch a full length step by step build guide
    A 20-25 minute Youtube video.  Watch it all at once.  The 5-10 min videos often skip steps.
    The in-depth videos save time because if you miss a step you're unaware of it, it costs a lot of time.
     
    2) Build in an intuitive order
    RAM can go in the motherboard before its attached to the case.  Possibly, the CPU cooler as well.
    However, the video card is best saved for later on so it doesn't take up hand room.
     
    3) Do a test build on the table before building inside of the case
    A beginner learning how to build and do cable management at the same time can be overwhelming.
    If a mistake is made, it's easier to correct it on a table than have to go inside a case full of parts.
    Also, it's easier to manage cables once you know where everything is supposed to go.
     
    4) Have a good work environment
    A big flat surface with enough free space (like a clear desk or a dining room table).
    Have a way to sort different screws, whether it's little dishes/containers or baggies.  You don't want to get any screws lost or mixed up.
     
    5) Know where the parts and connectors on the motherboards go
    It may vary, but I've generally noticed:
    * 8-pin connector is top left
    * 24-pin connector is right
    * RAM is top right next to the CPU slot
    * Front panel connectors and SATA ports are bottom right
    Establishing all this first will make cable management easier because you'll know which sides to put the cables on.
     
    6) insert the 24-pin connector correctly
    * Connect the 20pin +4 pin together before inseting
    * Apply enough pressure for it to go in all the way.  If it's not in all the way, it might result in your video card not powering on.
     
    7) Know the ordering front panel connectors go in advance
    The little tiny wires. i.e. The power/reset/LED +/- pins. This is one of the most difficult parts for many beginners. 
    It should say on the motherboard or on the manual booklet where they go.  Figure it out before you build to save trouble.
     
    8 ) Fully open the case , removing all the detachable panels, before working on it
    Also, make sure your OS boots properly and everything's fine before closing, so you don't have to re-open your case.
     
    9) installing the cooler correctly
    * Firstly, the little metal fan clips attach to the sides - not vertically - (they should look like ears).
    * Many coolers require bolts in the back of the motherboard to hold into place
    * Assuming the airflow is from the front to the back of the case, the fan on the cooler should face the same way as the fans on the case.
     
    10) Make sure the fans are in the right direction
    Use a sheet of paper to test which way the air is flowing, because it may be deceiving by just feeling it with hands.
    Typically, the face (the more aesthetically pleasing part of the fan) faces the front and sucks the air and the backside (with the wires/labels/etc. blows it out)
     
  9. Informative
    minervx got a reaction from Sychic in Relative GPU Benchmark Comparison (March 2019)   
    These numbers are from UserBenchmark.  I'm making this as a simple list so see where the most popular cards right now stack up, and which differences are the biggest.  I will use the GTX 1050 (the weakest card on the list) as the standard for comparison to see how big the jumps are.  This list is meant to be a very general view of the GPU market, to offer a sense of perspective (and for future reference).
     
     
    582% - RTX 2080 Ti
     
     449% - GTX 1080 Ti
    435% - RTX 2080
    420% - Radeon VII
     
    389% - RTX 2070
     
    364% - GTX 1080
    355% - Vega 64
     
    335% - GTX 1070 Ti
    323% - Vega 56
    316% - RTX 2060
     
    289% - GTX 1070
    286% - GTX 980 Ti
    271% - GTX 1660 Ti
     
    236% - GTX 1660
    235% - RX 590
     
    219% - GTX 980
    209% - GTX 1060 (6 GB)
    208% - RX 580
    196% - GTX 1060 (3 GB)
     
    191% - RX 480
    188% - GTX 970
    180% - RX 570
    169% - RX 470
     
    120% - GTX 960
    113% - GTX 1050 Ti
    100% - GTX 1050 
     
     
     
     
  10. Agree
    minervx got a reaction from Fasauceome in D.va PC mod =warboy=   
    the build looks amazing.  the cosplay is creepy.
  11. Agree
    minervx got a reaction from Fasauceome in Need a second opinion   
    What is this build for?  What resolution and what refresh rate?
     
    32 GB RAM is fine for video editing, but won't offer any benefit over 16 GB for gaming.
     
    You need a SSD.
     
  12. Agree
    minervx got a reaction from XR6 in Need a second opinion   
    What is this build for?  What resolution and what refresh rate?
     
    32 GB RAM is fine for video editing, but won't offer any benefit over 16 GB for gaming.
     
    You need a SSD.
     
  13. Agree
    minervx got a reaction from Tarun10 in AMP/DAC for Sennheiser HD58X   
    No, this is nonsense from Gearslutz.  People will say it sounds better as placebo (i.e. the bass sounds richer, the mids sound smoother and the high's sound more defined) without any evidence of actual EQ changes.
  14. Agree
    minervx got a reaction from Tarun10 in AMP/DAC for Sennheiser HD58X   
    More clear mid's and high's seems like an EQ claim.  If it's not the EQ and not measureable by a spectral analyzer, what aspect of the sound is improved?  The volume being louder?  The dynamics?
  15. Agree
    minervx got a reaction from _StrikE_ in Post Your Battle Stations and Build Setups!   
    yes.  16gb of ram is really overrated, unless you are a serious video/photo editor.  
     
    even then, i think a lot of people say they're building their machine for 4k content creation to justify splurging on parts, when really they're mostly using for gaming.
  16. Like
    minervx got a reaction from _StrikE_ in Post Your Battle Stations and Build Setups!   
    Minimalist.  I've had to move around a lot and declutter.  I would like to get a bigger desk when I get around to it.  I use a TV from my bed generally.  It's rather large as a monitor, so I'd prefer to get a 30" monitor instead.

  17. Like
    minervx got a reaction from kf6vci in GPU Price to Performance Chart (December 2018)   
    The ratings will change as prices fluctuate; this is a short-term list.  Use case is important; a GPU can be a great price-to-performance but could still be inadequate or overkill for the users needs.  But I think this can be a helpful resource for consumers and first-time PC builders to put the GPU's in perspective.
     

  18. Agree
    minervx got a reaction from finprev in Was Windows Vista THAT Bad?   
    Microsoft really should've done something for people who wanted an OS upgrade but didn't have the machine for it.  Maybe like a Vista Lite for older machines
  19. Agree
    minervx got a reaction from VinLAURiA in Was Windows Vista THAT Bad?   
    Microsoft really should've done something for people who wanted an OS upgrade but didn't have the machine for it.  Maybe like a Vista Lite for older machines
  20. Like
    minervx got a reaction from Raze_47 in Why do good girls like bad boys   
    All kinds of relationships are out there.  Good people, bad people, good relationships, bad relationships of all genders.  People will cherrypick the examples they find most comforting to believe (i.e. women prefer dating assholes so it's their fault i'm single). 
  21. Agree
    minervx got a reaction from TVwazhere in Wishlist for the case market in 2019   
    In general
    More cases like the Meshify C CoolerMaster continually improving the H500M More 200mm fans in general MATX cases that are actually meaningfully lower in volume/weight than ATX cases Small form factor market
    A sequel to the Node 202 that makes some refinements A successor or spiritual successor to the EVGA Hadron  A case like the DAN SFX or Loque Ghost S1 manufactured by a major company at an affordable price point. A case with vertical airflow like the Mac Pro An ITX version of the Meshify C Premium market
    Better ventilation on vanity cases. Detachable covers on the top of the case (i.e. like the Define series does) PWM fans  More thumbscrews 
  22. Like
    minervx reacted to KingCry in Best used cards to buy now?   
    GTX 1080/1080ti if you hunt long enough you will find some ABSOLUTE KILLER deals.
  23. Like
    minervx got a reaction from Riziko in 24 bit 48khz or 96khz? What's better?   
    The sample rate is, in very basic terms, relates to the width of the sound spectrum.  Generally, 0 to 20,000 Hz is audible to people.  Realistically, most of us are only going to hear sounds from 50 Hz to 15,000 Hz.  So yeah, you could have 96 KHz or even 192 KHz or even a million KHz, but that doesn't mean any additional utility because it's outside of the range of our hearing.  High sample rates are specs that manufacturers of audio products like to put on the box because consumers aren't very educated and they think higher numbers means more power.
     
    44.1 or 48 is all that's needed, even for professional audio.
  24. Agree
    minervx got a reaction from XR6 in The gaming benefits of 16 GB RAM are still small.   
    Computers with more RAM consume more RAM just because they can.  If Windows has it, it will use it on the contigency that the program might benefit from the extra RAM at some point, because there's nothing to lose by using more RAM if you have it.  This does not mean real-world performance is any better though. 
  25. Like
    minervx got a reaction from Hashiba in 120 GB SSD storage is not enough   
    If the budget is so tight that it's between 120 GB and no SSD, get the 120.  But considering that 240 GB SSD's are only $35, it makes more sense to start there.
     
    Coming from the perspective of someone who did start out with a 120 GB SSD a year ago, I made all the rationalizations in the world about how it would be enough.   I did the math and said "See, 120 GB will be enough", but ultimately people forget about a lot of things.  There are a lot of programs and files that you don't think about right now, but you'll want to have.  Programs and Windows update themselves and grow.  You might get a new hobby like photo/video/music editing.
     
    Yes, you can store anything that's not a program on a separate hard drive or routinely clean out your computer to make the 120 GB last, but that's the problem.  All the time you have to spend micromanaging your storage on a regular basis just isn't worth it. 
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