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OrionFOTL

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  1. Funny
    OrionFOTL reacted to Mark Kaine in CORSAIR - NEW RMX SERIES VERSION?   
    More importantly, can someone tell 'cybenetics' that they're missing an 'r'?  this is the most fake looking logo I've ever seen. 😂
  2. Like
    OrionFOTL reacted to akio123008 in Question about power supplies   
  3. Informative
    OrionFOTL reacted to Spotty in Question about power supplies   
    The two 8 pin blue ports are for PCIe cables. They're labelled PCI-e. The black 6pin sockets are for peripheral/SATA cables, they can't be used for PCIe.
     
    This is a clearer photo which should explain it...

  4. Like
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from jfarms in gpu says 18a 12v rail min; psu has 17a- still ok?   
    No, that's bullshit. It would mean the GT620 consumes 216W. It's actually rated for 49W, which is 4A on 12V. In reality, it probably doesn't even reach 49W.
     
    For comparison, the 6xx-era graphics card that actually consumed close to 216W was.. the first GTX Titan. (208W average power consumption).
  5. Like
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from saxyomega90125 in Seasonic SGX-500 vs Fractal Design Ion SFX 500G   
    Yes, they are the same.
     
    Fractal has 4 SATA connectors instead of 3, and appeared to be 3 decibels quieter in Aris's testing, otherwise they're the same.
    https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/seasonic-focus-sgx-500w-sfx-l-power-supply,6095.html
    https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/fractal-design-ion-sfx-gold-500w-power-supply-review
  6. Informative
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from boghubodaghi in Does someone knows the Enermax EMR1600EGT? Can´t find any reasonable documentation on it   
    Hi there. If you can't find any info or reviews on this Enermax, you can instead read about LEPA G1600-MA. They're the same PSU.
     
    Here's the best review you can find about it: https://www.techpowerup.com/review/lepa-g1600-ma/
     
  7. Agree
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from -rascal- in seasonic m12ii 650w vs be quiet! System Power 9 600W   
    Then post links to Denmark stores you'll be buying from, because we don't know what's available in Denmark and for what price.
     
    And post a working link to your parts list, because we can't recommend a PSU without knowing what it has to power.
  8. Agree
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from Letgomyleghoe in NEED HELP - 5v and 3.3v rails are very low on dual 1200w psu setup   
    Stick one probe into a ground pin of a PSU's cable, and stick the other probe into a voltage pin of a PSU's cable. Repeat for all voltages of both PSUs.
  9. Agree
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from Gorilla Warfare in Need Help - Seasonic Focus GX 750 or Bitfenix Whisper M 750 or Corsair RM 750   
    @ForwardVoltageYou are misinterpreting the warranty terms. "Wear and tear is not covered by warranty" does not mean "Wear and tear voids your warranty", as you're suggesting. It means you cannot demand an RMA just because your product is naturally worn through normal use. You can still demand an action for any number of issues covered by warranty, like a fan that stopped working.
  10. Like
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from LienusLateTips in New PSU, not what I expected   
    Let me get this straight - you think your new PSU is so much hotter, that its heat travels from the PSU's case, to your computer case (which the PSU doesn't even touch, as you mentioned), then from your computer case to your motherboard, then from your motherboard to the RAM modules, and there's still enough energy left on the train to heat them up by entire 10 degrees? And not only RAM, but every other object in the case as well?
  11. Like
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from LienusLateTips in New PSU, not what I expected   
    Power supplies don't need to touch the computer case to work, there's nothing wrong with your build whatsoever.
     
    This just means you're measuring temperature wrong, or did something else that made them heat up more, because power supplies can't do that.
     
    Did you really take temperature measurements of every single computer component before you got a new PSU, using some sort of accurate measurement tool, and then took the same measurements again with a new PSU?
  12. Like
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from LienusLateTips in New PSU, not what I expected   
    Hello. Your Be Quiet Straight Power 11 650W has its secondary side +12V MOSFETs placed on the underside of the main PCB, and the PSU's case acts as their heatsink. This heats up the PSU's case more than cheaper power supplies.
    The +12 rectifiers in your old PSU were cooled by an ordinary vertical heatsink, with the PSU's fan trying to exhaust it out of the PSU. This design doesn't allow to utilize the unit's case as a heatsink.
     
    So, the reason your new PSU feels hotter to your human hands is because your new PSU is more efficient at removing heat from its most important components.
     
    Ordinary users don't need to think or worry about what temps a PSU's case should be or how fast its fan should be spinning. Just let the PSU do its job - the engineers who designed it and programmed the fan curve know their stuff.
     
    Operating temperature refers to the environment where the PSU is placed, and in your case it's around 22 degrees C (air temperature in your room) plus a few degrees for the warmer air inside the computer case, unless you live in a country where it's much colder or much hotter.
    Components inside an operating power supply get as hot as 100C, in some cases even surpassing 125C. This is not the same thing as operating temperature.
  13. Informative
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from Mark Kaine in New PSU, not what I expected   
    Hello. Your Be Quiet Straight Power 11 650W has its secondary side +12V MOSFETs placed on the underside of the main PCB, and the PSU's case acts as their heatsink. This heats up the PSU's case more than cheaper power supplies.
    The +12 rectifiers in your old PSU were cooled by an ordinary vertical heatsink, with the PSU's fan trying to exhaust it out of the PSU. This design doesn't allow to utilize the unit's case as a heatsink.
     
    So, the reason your new PSU feels hotter to your human hands is because your new PSU is more efficient at removing heat from its most important components.
     
    Ordinary users don't need to think or worry about what temps a PSU's case should be or how fast its fan should be spinning. Just let the PSU do its job - the engineers who designed it and programmed the fan curve know their stuff.
     
    Operating temperature refers to the environment where the PSU is placed, and in your case it's around 22 degrees C (air temperature in your room) plus a few degrees for the warmer air inside the computer case, unless you live in a country where it's much colder or much hotter.
    Components inside an operating power supply get as hot as 100C, in some cases even surpassing 125C. This is not the same thing as operating temperature.
  14. Informative
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from seon123 in New PSU, not what I expected   
    Hello. Your Be Quiet Straight Power 11 650W has its secondary side +12V MOSFETs placed on the underside of the main PCB, and the PSU's case acts as their heatsink. This heats up the PSU's case more than cheaper power supplies.
    The +12 rectifiers in your old PSU were cooled by an ordinary vertical heatsink, with the PSU's fan trying to exhaust it out of the PSU. This design doesn't allow to utilize the unit's case as a heatsink.
     
    So, the reason your new PSU feels hotter to your human hands is because your new PSU is more efficient at removing heat from its most important components.
     
    Ordinary users don't need to think or worry about what temps a PSU's case should be or how fast its fan should be spinning. Just let the PSU do its job - the engineers who designed it and programmed the fan curve know their stuff.
     
    Operating temperature refers to the environment where the PSU is placed, and in your case it's around 22 degrees C (air temperature in your room) plus a few degrees for the warmer air inside the computer case, unless you live in a country where it's much colder or much hotter.
    Components inside an operating power supply get as hot as 100C, in some cases even surpassing 125C. This is not the same thing as operating temperature.
  15. Informative
    OrionFOTL reacted to seon123 in Power Supply Recommendation?   
    The budget is already high enough. The problem with your recommendations is the context. The RM850x is £134, so £6 less than the RMi. The RM1000i is not only unnecessary, but £250. Seasonic's PSUs... Are just a no. Cost more than better options from other companies, and they also have issues with transients.
  16. Agree
    OrionFOTL reacted to seon123 in Power Supply Recommendation?   
    From PCPP UK, I'd recommend the RM750x 2018 White for £120, or the RM850i for £140. They are quiet, and perform well. The RMi has software monitoring, and togglable multi rail OCP. The MSI A-GF 750W for £119 is another decent option. It has multi rail OCP, but a worse fan, so it likely won't be quiet as quiet as the RMx/i.
     
    Just completely ignore the "advice" of anyone that recommends by 80+ rating and/or brand, as neither are relevant at all. Same as recommending someone a "4GB Asus GPU".
  17. Like
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from Apollyon2020 in PSU Efficiency Confusion   
    Efficiency has no effect on parts connected to the PSU.
  18. Like
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from Apollyon2020 in PSU Efficiency Confusion   
    If you're idle (and using let's say 40W) and the efficiency is 89%, that means you're pulling 44.94W from the wall.
    If you're gaming (let's say using 250W) and the efficiency is 92%, you're pulling 271.73W from the wall.
     
    Here's the efficiency chart for your PSU, from https://www.techpowerup.com/review/corsair-hx1000i/6.html:

  19. Agree
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from SuperLeo23 in Should i buy the Hiditec BZ 650 650W?   
    No, you shouldn't, because nobody knows if it's good or bad.
     
    In fact, there are only reasons to think it's bad, and no reasons to think it's good.
    One of them is the fact it only has 480W available on the 12V voltage, which is the most important one for computers. If your PC actually needed 550W, then this 650W power supply wouldn't be able to support it. This PSU has less power on 12V than good 500W PSUs, which is a sign of terrible quality and a manufacturer trying to scam clueless customers.
     
    Also, your computer doesn't need 550W. Your entire PC will have huge trouble surpassing 130W total power consumption under heavy load, and I'm 100% serious.
  20. Agree
    OrionFOTL reacted to Spotty in Is this peak or continuous wattage?   
    Seasonic? That's just marketing bullshittery of how they advertise their temperature rating. The prime units for example are advertised as rated for 50°C, but only up to 80% load. They're only rated for 40°C at 100% load. 
     
    I must admit I'm guilty of doing that sometimes. I guess it's just easier to get the point across to someone who doesn't understand power supplies at all and could be easily overwhelmed with too much information when you start explaining the different voltages and such. Though, your explanation there does seem very easy to understand.
     
    There are also power supplies that just lie. They'll be labelled as "850w" and "total output 850w" then have 400w on 12v and 100w on 5v & 3.3v. 
    Such as this...
     
  21. Like
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from Spotty in Is this peak or continuous wattage?   
    Like others said, your power supply says it can output 700W continuously. It can output at most 696W out of 700W on the 12V rail, which is used the most by computer components.
     
    The post on reddit is needlessly confusing to you. It points out that some very cheap power supplies have much lower limits on the 12V rail, which makes them less useful for modern computers. If your computer consumes 350W from the 12V voltage and 50W from 5V&3.3V voltages, then it wouldn't be able to be powered from a 500W PSU which is rated for 300W on 12V and 200W on the other voltages.
     
    The post from reddit is wrong in this part, which is very often a source of confusion on how power supplies are rated:
        "EVGA G2 550w as an example. It has 45.8 amps on the 12V rail. It comes out to 549w. This power supply can output 549w."
     
    The last part is wrong - the EVGA can output 550W. A 500W PSU rated for 300W on 12V and 200W on other rails is not a 300W PSU, it's a 500W PSU. Even a hypothetical 500W PSU rated for 5W on 12V and 495W on other rails is not "a 5W PSU", it's a 500W PSU - despite being useless for all computers.
    By the same logic, my phone charger is a 0W PSU because it doesn't have a 12V rail at all.
     
    Power supplies with 12V rails rated for much lower power than their total power are bad and something you should be wary of, but too many people take it too far, look at a 500W PSU with a 300W 12V rail, and say "this is a 300W PSU!". They should instead say "your computer would only have access to a little over 300W out of this 500W PSU, and wouldn't be able to use much of the remaining 200W".
  22. Agree
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from ninjaboyxd629 in Is this peak or continuous wattage?   
    Like others said, your power supply says it can output 700W continuously. It can output at most 696W out of 700W on the 12V rail, which is used the most by computer components.
     
    The post on reddit is needlessly confusing to you. It points out that some very cheap power supplies have much lower limits on the 12V rail, which makes them less useful for modern computers. If your computer consumes 350W from the 12V voltage and 50W from 5V&3.3V voltages, then it wouldn't be able to be powered from a 500W PSU which is rated for 300W on 12V and 200W on the other voltages.
     
    The post from reddit is wrong in this part, which is very often a source of confusion on how power supplies are rated:
        "EVGA G2 550w as an example. It has 45.8 amps on the 12V rail. It comes out to 549w. This power supply can output 549w."
     
    The last part is wrong - the EVGA can output 550W. A 500W PSU rated for 300W on 12V and 200W on other rails is not a 300W PSU, it's a 500W PSU. Even a hypothetical 500W PSU rated for 5W on 12V and 495W on other rails is not "a 5W PSU", it's a 500W PSU - despite being useless for all computers.
    By the same logic, my phone charger is a 0W PSU because it doesn't have a 12V rail at all.
     
    Power supplies with 12V rails rated for much lower power than their total power are bad and something you should be wary of, but too many people take it too far, look at a 500W PSU with a 300W 12V rail, and say "this is a 300W PSU!". They should instead say "your computer would only have access to a little over 300W out of this 500W PSU, and wouldn't be able to use much of the remaining 200W".
  23. Like
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from Ragavron in How much pixel does a average size of human being consume as compared to our sun in an 8K display   
    He obviously meant to write 5 feet 9 inches. What's the big deal? There's bigger things to focus on in this post than an obvious typo.
  24. Agree
    OrionFOTL reacted to Ankerson in Is this peak or continuous wattage?   
    Then there is the curve ball:
     
    Output at a certain temperature, then it will drop.
     
    So it really does matter what the PSU is, and how it's rated and what it is rated at.
     
    Some PSUs are only rated at 30C while others are rated at 40C or 50C.
     
    And still some PSUs even rated at 50C will drop their output at 40C by a certain percentage. 
     
    So the quality of the PSU DOES MATTER.
  25. Like
    OrionFOTL got a reaction from seon123 in Combining 12v rails?   
    It's not only "possible", that's how you're supposed to use them. That's the whole point of multi-rail PSUs. Connecting devices using multiple rails, so each individual cable is protected from short circuits while still allowing the device to use large amounts of power.
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