Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

wanderingfool2

Member
  • Content Count

    609
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from lewdicrous in The price of taking on Steam - Epic Games loosing money with EGS according to Apple   
    Getting exclusives is a sound business plan (assuming you can ride it out).  The argument you proposed glosses over cause and effect.  Loss leaders exist for a reason, just like exclusives exist for a reason.  The way to look at it, would there have been the $265 million in sales if it weren't for the exclusives (otherwise who would be incentivized to go with EGS)
  2. Agree
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from Bensemus in Elon Musk's Neuralink says this monkey is playing Pong with its mind   
    While not exactly a new concept that video does show a decent improvement to tracking compared to other demonstrations of similar tech I've seen in the past.  I don't think pong is anything impressive, but the cursor game was a lot more telling of what the future tech could provide to those without the ability to move their limbs.
     
    Going to go out a limb and say you follow ThunderF00t or rather that you watched ThunderF00t's video? (He cherry picked data, and got some of the simple math wrong)  Either way, a few notes.  Pricing does not equal cost, as is very evident in the current chip shortage and the wild high prices for GPU's.  SpaceX simply has to price theirs lower than their competitors.  SpaceX is currently providing human rated vessels at a cheaper price than anyone else
     
    Who cares what Elon Musk says, it's like listening to Intel or others about what tech will be like in 5 years.  It's an optimistic approach, and it's good to set loafty goals (to strive towards hitting them).  It's like settings your own goals in life/interviewing in the 5 years from now question, do you say "I want to be slowly progressing up the ladder"...you say a more optimistic approach.
     
    I'm not praising Elon Musk, but you have to give credit where credit is due, he knows how to assemble a team of people to get his goals done (maybe not in the time he wants it), but he has made progression within the market.
  3. Agree
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from LAwLz in Supreme Court hands Google a victory in a multibillion-dollar case against Oracle   
    Yes, you are correct this was more to do with a copyright case.  I do agree, software patents just need to die out (they don't exist here in Canada and there isn't much of an issue).  Similar things can be said about copyright as well though, I think copyrights in general shouldn't last more than 25 years.
     
    While I do agree that decisions made early do haunt Android, the choice of Java I don't think is one that really had any feasible solution.
     
    Flash Lite btw is still a propitiatory language, so even if they made a third party implementation it would more likely be fraught with lawsuits (that even they won't be able to wiggle out of).  Again, it's the same argument for not using C#...at the time some people modded Android to accept C# and converted code...it ran a lot quicker than Java did; but there is the issue of Microsoft owning C#.  It really defeats the purpose when developers would have to buy proprietary software to develop games.
     
    Java also performed better and was better suited for phone development ( https://www.cs.ru.ac.za/research/g04k1804/stuff/thesis.pdf ) [Written Nov 2007]
    So no, Flash Lite wouldn't be viable.
     
    Like it or hate it, Java was one of the only available contenders aside from doing the Apple approach of low level languages (but that has issues, given that there would be multiple different devices).  I am glad that Oracle lost this lawsuit, because it would be bad for the community as a whole if it was allowed to stand
  4. Agree
    wanderingfool2 reacted to WolframaticAlpha in Supreme Court hands Google a victory in a multibillion-dollar case against Oracle   
    Imo, software patents shouldn't last for more than 5 years. Enough to have a headstart and capitalise on your invention, not that much to stifle innovation and kill your golden goose.
  5. Agree
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from LAwLz in Supreme Court hands Google a victory in a multibillion-dollar case against Oracle   
    The fact that BlackBerry was used as an inspiration (or even to try getting Apps over), doesn't negate anything I said.  My original argument was that Java was chosen before Oracle got it's hands on Sun Microsystems (and Sun had given Android praise as well).  You bringing up Blackberry doesn't lesson my argument in the slightest.
     
    Actually as well, they didn't "literately said it themselves."  The article shows that their phone looked like a BlackBerry and utilized Java.  Again, it was 2000's, Java was a major player at the time (and again, without BlackBerry the decision would still have come down to likely using Java)
     
    I mean seriously, name an alternative to Java at the time that could have realistically been used for smartphones.  Java was really the only player at the time (that wasn't a walled garden solution)
  6. Agree
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from LAwLz in Supreme Court hands Google a victory in a multibillion-dollar case against Oracle   
    The context in which I said it does make it mean a lot.  The argument being that Google made a bad choice due to the multinational huge company (which at the time, Oracle wasn't the owner and Sun was very much open to having Android use Java).
     
    There is a huge reason why one would go with Java.  In 2008 there weren't many other options compared to Java, and Java was a pretty well taught language at the time.  There was c#, but that was very much controlled by Microsoft at that time (and would be a bad choice due to it not being open source).
    Python you loose a lot more efficiency
    C++ has a higher learning curve to Java, you can make a lot more mistakes and can't really compile it to opcode (which at the time meant mobile chips would have to be more standardized)
     
    The fact is as well, you had a lot more developers who were familiar with Java than other languages as well (that's the first thing they taught at my school, as it was thought as a simpler language than C/C++).  Just because Blackberry was using it, doesn't specifically mean it was chosen for that.  If the iPhone existed, and BlackBerry didn't, I would still bet that Java would have been used as the vehicle of choice.
     
  7. Agree
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from thechinchinsong in Intel offering AI software to bleep out gamer words   
    It's a client-side thing...so not really censorship.
     
    It is at least promising...seeing as there have been people who stream snipe to try getting streamers in trouble.  This at least will allow for an extra layer, to hopefully weed out some of the incidences that have occurred to people streaming live
  8. Informative
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from BuckGup in Intel offering AI software to bleep out gamer words   
    It's a client-side thing...so not really censorship.
     
    It is at least promising...seeing as there have been people who stream snipe to try getting streamers in trouble.  This at least will allow for an extra layer, to hopefully weed out some of the incidences that have occurred to people streaming live
  9. Agree
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from Sauron in Intel offering AI software to bleep out gamer words   
    It's a client-side thing...so not really censorship.
     
    It is at least promising...seeing as there have been people who stream snipe to try getting streamers in trouble.  This at least will allow for an extra layer, to hopefully weed out some of the incidences that have occurred to people streaming live
  10. Agree
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from arkscout in Most chip companies show signs of active compromise   
    I'd argue that if it were really well-known companies it would have already been publicized and there would have been already the announcement of major hacks.
     
    While they do use the words "the 17 most prominent players", the list they chose from seems to imply to me that they might have set a very large net.  I derive this from the following "such as “fabless” chip designers, semiconductor software designers, manufacturers of equipment that fabricates semiconductors, foundries, and integrated device manufacturers (IDMs)".  The list already includes quite a bit leeway for companies to choose from, but given they say such as it could mean that they chose a more broad sense.
     
    Other questions would be, how did they actually test/determine potential vulnerabilities.  I bet most major corporations have one or two IP addresses registered to them that have devices that are vulnerable (but little to contain that would compromise the company).  An example being, a camera system that was setup by a third party vendor without a firewall and RDP enabled but still needed a static IP (and the location has a spare static IP that was given to it)...it was only none-essential cameras in a public area but had it been scanned it would show up as having RDP port open.  Doesn't really put too much of a risk to the company (although in this case, it was fixed).
     
    Unless they actually go into more detail about what was discovered, or whether they even found honeypots.
  11. Informative
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from Brooksie359 in Android sends 20x more data to Google than iOS sends to Apple, study says   
    I'll agree and disagree.
     
    While, I do admit you can't really remove some of the Google Apps, I think the paper is wrong and should say Android consumes 20x more data cap than Apple.  e.g. (hypothetical) if Google sends only the phone's ID as a check-in, and Apple does as well...but each Google service decides to do so as well...it's still consuming 20x more data but realistically it's sending the same data.
     
    Actually, looking at their "Table 1", they do seem to share similar data with the only notable distinctions being that Apple sends location, nearby wifi MAC addresses and local IP address information (although it does seem as though Apple you can turn the location thing off).  Overall, I think this is just a paper trying to make a splash, and the news outlet running with it.
  12. Agree
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from Distinctly Average in PS4's internal clock battery could brick your console   
    I doubt it has to do with time-traveling exploits.  My assumption is that is has more to do with things such as game purchases and their early releases...especially since games can get downloaded prior to the launch date (they wouldn't want someone to set their system clock ahead and play the game early).  That would be my guess anyways, that they would have true system time and set system time (if user manually set time) and games launching would check against that.  Also things such as expired security certificates.
     
    My guess will be though, Sony will release a patch to the system at/near EOL that eliminates the need for a connection to the PSN...or someone will find a simple to use exploit to fix the problem
  13. Informative
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from Ithanul in Amazon: We see you when you're Peeing, We know when you're unsafe...   
    On a note for everyone:
    - The camera system gives audible reminders when it detects things such as unsafe following, and red-light running (so automatic feedback, which I think is good)
    - The camera can detect yawning, and even warn the driver to pull over for 15 minutes (this would benefit the driver).
    - The camera can be used in the event of an accident (if the driver is not at fault it can help them, and in either case it could mean that Amazon has a reduced insurance cost)
    - The camera is actually 4 parts, road, sides and driver...essentially a 360 camera
    - It is equipped on Amazon branded vehicles
    https://www.cnet.com/news/senators-question-amazon-on-use-of-cameras-to-monitor-delivery-drivers/
     
    1 - Actually, if you are being paid by Amazon (and do something else on their time) it would be considered their IP (or at least they have partial ownership).  Sure, they might not have the right to sell it since it's not in the contract, but you don't have the right to claim it as your own entirely as well (i.e. If you were to sell it, Amazon could also pursue you). The fact is, if you are contracted for a job between a set range of hours and you do other things they can try claiming IP as you are doing so on Amazon's dime.
    2 - Do more research into it.  It is Amazon's property.  They are deploying it in Amazon branded vehicles, the drivers are contracted, but it's still Amazon branded vehicles (and thus Amazon has more control over them)
    3 - Just because it can be used against you doesn't invalidate the point that it can also protect you.  If you get fired/reprimanded for not delivering all your packages in the allotted time, you could request the GPS and camera footage to show that you in fact were unable to do so.  If you want to take a bathroom break; and you get in trouble for it because you haven't delivered enough packages...you now have video proof showing that you didn't spend an unreasonable time finding/using a bathroom (which would mean they can't punish you and if they do you could sue under the Fair Labor Standards Act.
    5 - Again, you could use the video against them.  Bathroom breaks have been held up in court (within reason)
    6 - His attitude wasn't rude.
     
    1 - They have a video of the side (likely there is still quite the obstruction, but there are a decent amount of videos out there showing the Amazon driver doing the deed at the front of the vehicle...which this would definitely catch).  Point is, find a bathroom, if they go after you just sue them for violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act
    2/3/4 - You are making assumptions again.  Again do some research on this subject before you start making drastic claims. (fyi it doesn't capture sound).
     
    In the comment about the accident, by the time an accident happened it's already too late.  Having a wrong driver behind the wheel can invalidate the insurance and thus could mean a whole lot of money if an accident occurs (cost of the vehicle, cost of the packages, cost of any injuries to the opposing party)...sure Amazon could go after the driver for the lost money, but it would be likely they wouldn't be able to afford it.
     
    Again, I just want to point out there hasn't been any evidence you have shown that says it is going in unbranded personal vehicles.  The indication is that it's in the branded Amazon vehicles (which do have contract drivers)
  14. Like
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from leadeater in Amazon: We see you when you're Peeing, We know when you're unsafe...   
    On a note for everyone:
    - The camera system gives audible reminders when it detects things such as unsafe following, and red-light running (so automatic feedback, which I think is good)
    - The camera can detect yawning, and even warn the driver to pull over for 15 minutes (this would benefit the driver).
    - The camera can be used in the event of an accident (if the driver is not at fault it can help them, and in either case it could mean that Amazon has a reduced insurance cost)
    - The camera is actually 4 parts, road, sides and driver...essentially a 360 camera
    - It is equipped on Amazon branded vehicles
    https://www.cnet.com/news/senators-question-amazon-on-use-of-cameras-to-monitor-delivery-drivers/
     
    1 - Actually, if you are being paid by Amazon (and do something else on their time) it would be considered their IP (or at least they have partial ownership).  Sure, they might not have the right to sell it since it's not in the contract, but you don't have the right to claim it as your own entirely as well (i.e. If you were to sell it, Amazon could also pursue you). The fact is, if you are contracted for a job between a set range of hours and you do other things they can try claiming IP as you are doing so on Amazon's dime.
    2 - Do more research into it.  It is Amazon's property.  They are deploying it in Amazon branded vehicles, the drivers are contracted, but it's still Amazon branded vehicles (and thus Amazon has more control over them)
    3 - Just because it can be used against you doesn't invalidate the point that it can also protect you.  If you get fired/reprimanded for not delivering all your packages in the allotted time, you could request the GPS and camera footage to show that you in fact were unable to do so.  If you want to take a bathroom break; and you get in trouble for it because you haven't delivered enough packages...you now have video proof showing that you didn't spend an unreasonable time finding/using a bathroom (which would mean they can't punish you and if they do you could sue under the Fair Labor Standards Act.
    5 - Again, you could use the video against them.  Bathroom breaks have been held up in court (within reason)
    6 - His attitude wasn't rude.
     
    1 - They have a video of the side (likely there is still quite the obstruction, but there are a decent amount of videos out there showing the Amazon driver doing the deed at the front of the vehicle...which this would definitely catch).  Point is, find a bathroom, if they go after you just sue them for violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act
    2/3/4 - You are making assumptions again.  Again do some research on this subject before you start making drastic claims. (fyi it doesn't capture sound).
     
    In the comment about the accident, by the time an accident happened it's already too late.  Having a wrong driver behind the wheel can invalidate the insurance and thus could mean a whole lot of money if an accident occurs (cost of the vehicle, cost of the packages, cost of any injuries to the opposing party)...sure Amazon could go after the driver for the lost money, but it would be likely they wouldn't be able to afford it.
     
    Again, I just want to point out there hasn't been any evidence you have shown that says it is going in unbranded personal vehicles.  The indication is that it's in the branded Amazon vehicles (which do have contract drivers)
  15. Like
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from dizmo in Amazon: We see you when you're Peeing, We know when you're unsafe...   
    On a note for everyone:
    - The camera system gives audible reminders when it detects things such as unsafe following, and red-light running (so automatic feedback, which I think is good)
    - The camera can detect yawning, and even warn the driver to pull over for 15 minutes (this would benefit the driver).
    - The camera can be used in the event of an accident (if the driver is not at fault it can help them, and in either case it could mean that Amazon has a reduced insurance cost)
    - The camera is actually 4 parts, road, sides and driver...essentially a 360 camera
    - It is equipped on Amazon branded vehicles
    https://www.cnet.com/news/senators-question-amazon-on-use-of-cameras-to-monitor-delivery-drivers/
     
    1 - Actually, if you are being paid by Amazon (and do something else on their time) it would be considered their IP (or at least they have partial ownership).  Sure, they might not have the right to sell it since it's not in the contract, but you don't have the right to claim it as your own entirely as well (i.e. If you were to sell it, Amazon could also pursue you). The fact is, if you are contracted for a job between a set range of hours and you do other things they can try claiming IP as you are doing so on Amazon's dime.
    2 - Do more research into it.  It is Amazon's property.  They are deploying it in Amazon branded vehicles, the drivers are contracted, but it's still Amazon branded vehicles (and thus Amazon has more control over them)
    3 - Just because it can be used against you doesn't invalidate the point that it can also protect you.  If you get fired/reprimanded for not delivering all your packages in the allotted time, you could request the GPS and camera footage to show that you in fact were unable to do so.  If you want to take a bathroom break; and you get in trouble for it because you haven't delivered enough packages...you now have video proof showing that you didn't spend an unreasonable time finding/using a bathroom (which would mean they can't punish you and if they do you could sue under the Fair Labor Standards Act.
    5 - Again, you could use the video against them.  Bathroom breaks have been held up in court (within reason)
    6 - His attitude wasn't rude.
     
    1 - They have a video of the side (likely there is still quite the obstruction, but there are a decent amount of videos out there showing the Amazon driver doing the deed at the front of the vehicle...which this would definitely catch).  Point is, find a bathroom, if they go after you just sue them for violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act
    2/3/4 - You are making assumptions again.  Again do some research on this subject before you start making drastic claims. (fyi it doesn't capture sound).
     
    In the comment about the accident, by the time an accident happened it's already too late.  Having a wrong driver behind the wheel can invalidate the insurance and thus could mean a whole lot of money if an accident occurs (cost of the vehicle, cost of the packages, cost of any injuries to the opposing party)...sure Amazon could go after the driver for the lost money, but it would be likely they wouldn't be able to afford it.
     
    Again, I just want to point out there hasn't been any evidence you have shown that says it is going in unbranded personal vehicles.  The indication is that it's in the branded Amazon vehicles (which do have contract drivers)
  16. Agree
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from Blade of Grass in Apple Ceases Approving VPN App Updates from UN Recommended App Maker   
    It does seem like Proton is trying to make a mountain out of a mole hill...but at the same time, this really speaks to the inconsistencies of the rule enforcement (and the general issue that there are so many rules that vary reviewer by reviewer that probably every App released has something in it that Apple could refuse entry to the App store).
     
    While I do believe it is tone deaf, and shouldn't have happened; Proton could easily just modify the description and have the update passed through.
     
    On a similar note, I do feel that a lot of VPN's really cross the line in terms of geo-blocking advertisement.  It always irks me when people use the circumvention for Netflix, but at the same time that is akin to advertising piracy
  17. Like
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from Jet_ski in Coinbase to Pay $6.5 Million for False, Misleading, or Inaccurate Reporting and Wash Trading   
    I don't think the fact that the trades are reported really means much though....with wash sales all that needs to happen is showing that they intentionally were doing sales that had no value (except with the purpose to show higher volumes).  [Aggregate volume is what would be looked at, as you wouldn't be able to tell that the volume was synthetically created with wash sales]
     
    I think based on the wording, the accusation is that Coinbase created trades between accounts (so a wash trade as it's a net zero loss/gain really) but included that volume in their information regarding the exchange. (especially if it was done through multiple accounts).  It's akin to a pump and dump, creating artificial volume to gain attention isn't allowed.
     
    There has been other exchanges/people who have been accused of this in the past, I don't think this is a crypto crackdown really.
     
    It's akin to a company claiming to have sold 1 million vehicles, but really they kept selling the vehicles to themselves (or subsidiaries).
  18. Agree
    wanderingfool2 reacted to wkdpaul in Grandma out $1400 after grandson racks up playstation in game purchases.   
    Totally agree with your points. But even if a kid doesn't have allowances, they should be taught about money ;
     
    My 8yo gets to use the family iPad and Android tablet (with parental oversight), and she's already aware not to download anything from the app stores, or when in a game or app. We don't have CC linked to the account used on those devices, but we still taught her how it works within tech, and also IRL, like she knows food, toys, and stuff in general cost money, and somewhat understand monetary value to a point as we started allowing her to buy small toys and pluches from her own Christmas / birthday money.
     
    I'm confused as to why a 13yo isn't yet aware that stuff cost money.
  19. Agree
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from Poet129 in Internet Connection Help!   
    Curious, did the tech check for the noise at the jack or outside your house?  Depending on the age of the house/other wiring you have, the noise could be caused by something in your house.  If the noise existed outside of your house, then there isn't much you can do except see if they will climb the pole to test the signal there (in my case they did, and replaced the line running to my house).  The other thing would be having the modem on the closes outlet to where the phone lines come into your house
     
    Depending how vital it is and how much you currently are paying, Starlink might be a good option for you
  20. Agree
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from StDragon in OVH Cloud suffers major fire in Strasbourg datacenter   
    From OVH's website under "Maximum Physical Security"
    Apparently they missed the fire suppression portion.  Honestly though, it would be interesting to see an analysis of where the fire started and how it was able to spread so much.  In the datacenter's I've been in, they all have been outfitted with systems that would allow damage to be very contained (and in some cases have it starve the fire of oxygen)
     
    At the very least, I would have thought they would have had better fire suppression system that would have prevented the spread to multiple datacenter rooms.
  21. Agree
    wanderingfool2 reacted to leadeater in OVH Cloud suffers major fire in Strasbourg datacenter   
    That's typical of any hosting provider, it's a supply of services not disaster protection plan with it. So unless the service you are paying for is Geo-Replicated, which is generally a premium option upgrade, it's on the customers to implement data protection. And even then replication is not backup, neither are snapshots and replicated snapshots that live in the primary storage bucket/array.
     
    Even if you are using a DRaaS offering the service itself does not include DR or backups, it's a service you use to implement in to your architecture design to create a DR strategy and operational procedure.
     
    This is the difference between High Availability (HA) and High Resiliency (HR), what you're getting is only HR unless you have purchased an HA option like Geo-Replication, which still excludes backup.
     
    It's these specific, but very important, details that often get overlooked and not properly considered with the current trend to move services in to the Cloud and this issue is compounded by Software as a Service and Platform as a Service offerings as you have no idea if DR and backups have been architected in to them at all and worse there may be no way to integrate in with backup software or some other process to extract data out regularly for backups. Sometimes things are cheaper because you are functionally getting an inferior service compared to what you had before.
  22. Agree
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from Kuo Chun Huang in MagSafe ports patented, possibility pending   
    While I do hate proprietary solutions, USB C I think is given too much credit.  I'm on my second phone where something fell into the connector and when I put in the cable it squished to the bottom (unable to properly clean it out).  So while it still works, it has become very easy to knock out the cable or depending on the cord not transfer data/no fast charging.  So Apple's solution does look better to me (if it wasn't so proprietary) just because it prevents my failure use case
  23. Agree
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from Letgomyleghoe in MagSafe ports patented, possibility pending   
    While I do hate proprietary solutions, USB C I think is given too much credit.  I'm on my second phone where something fell into the connector and when I put in the cable it squished to the bottom (unable to properly clean it out).  So while it still works, it has become very easy to knock out the cable or depending on the cord not transfer data/no fast charging.  So Apple's solution does look better to me (if it wasn't so proprietary) just because it prevents my failure use case
  24. Informative
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from Bombastinator in MagSafe ports patented, possibility pending   
    While I do hate proprietary solutions, USB C I think is given too much credit.  I'm on my second phone where something fell into the connector and when I put in the cable it squished to the bottom (unable to properly clean it out).  So while it still works, it has become very easy to knock out the cable or depending on the cord not transfer data/no fast charging.  So Apple's solution does look better to me (if it wasn't so proprietary) just because it prevents my failure use case
  25. Agree
    wanderingfool2 got a reaction from kelvinhall05 in MagSafe ports patented, possibility pending   
    While I do hate proprietary solutions, USB C I think is given too much credit.  I'm on my second phone where something fell into the connector and when I put in the cable it squished to the bottom (unable to properly clean it out).  So while it still works, it has become very easy to knock out the cable or depending on the cord not transfer data/no fast charging.  So Apple's solution does look better to me (if it wasn't so proprietary) just because it prevents my failure use case
×