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Sakuriru

Member
  • Content Count

    791
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Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Sakuriru got a reaction from shadow_ray in Decoding   
    I don't think you're quite grasping the breadth and depth of the topic.
     
    Encoding is a scheme in which you translate letters into something computers can deal with. Computers don't know what "a" is. You can't write "a" to a disk, store it in memory, or pass it around because those are all tasks that are exclusively for binary data. So people created encoding schemes. Note that this is much different than the kind of secret spy "encoded message", since it's not really trying to obfuscate data, but just manage it for computers to use.
     
    There's hundreds of different ways to encode text data (or strings, in programmer parlance), but some of the most common is ASCII and UTF-8. But because humans read text, it's pretty important for it to be ingrained in computing systems at a deep level, which is why it's seldom necessary to have to handle the details of actually encoding or decoding yourself.
  2. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from tikker in Space technology that can help us save our environment on Earth   
    This is a very common misconception. It's still global warming; it's always been global warming. The Earth hasn't stopped warming.
  3. Like
    Sakuriru got a reaction from AzzaNezz in Is it worth learning programming? Or maybe something else?   
    Teaching everyone to write didn't put writers out of work.
  4. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from Eigenvektor in Decoding   
    I don't think you're quite grasping the breadth and depth of the topic.
     
    Encoding is a scheme in which you translate letters into something computers can deal with. Computers don't know what "a" is. You can't write "a" to a disk, store it in memory, or pass it around because those are all tasks that are exclusively for binary data. So people created encoding schemes. Note that this is much different than the kind of secret spy "encoded message", since it's not really trying to obfuscate data, but just manage it for computers to use.
     
    There's hundreds of different ways to encode text data (or strings, in programmer parlance), but some of the most common is ASCII and UTF-8. But because humans read text, it's pretty important for it to be ingrained in computing systems at a deep level, which is why it's seldom necessary to have to handle the details of actually encoding or decoding yourself.
  5. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from Letgomyleghoe in Whats your thoughts on the raising of minimum wage?   
    whoo yeah lets do it
  6. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from LAwLz in What happens to the textures when the vRAM gets full?   
    Swapping.
     
    Your performance will vary greatly depending on how often the computer needs to swap out memory, this is game dependent.
  7. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from dalekphalm in Microsoft providing electronics upgrade to US military helmets.   
    Sounds like a good way to get a statement of charges and an ass chewing from your first line. The military already has other expensive optics like night vision goggles. It's really not much different from an equipment management perspective.
  8. Like
    Sakuriru got a reaction from Froody129 in What are some things that you feel that "they don't make them like they used to"?   
    I've wracked my brain for about five minutes and couldn't legitimately think of something. I think it's a common sentiment that's shaded by the fact older things that last are the older things that are left, while newer things that are junk are going to still be around.
     
    Several examples in this thread may suffer from this survivor bias. For example, the idea that older houses are built to last may come from a perception that only old houses actually built to last are remaining. The common pick is that tools are more cheaply produced today, and that may be true of specific brands (such as Craftsman), but I don't think is a fair comparison of a general product as a whole. Wrenches are sometimes included as an example, but there's nothing stopping you from purchasing high-end Nepros. Cars are often given as another example, but in that case the cars of today are designed to be safer with more "flimsy" materials that will accordion when involved in a collision instead of attempting to retain its rigidity.
     
    Idk man I'd have to be convinced with a good data set.
  9. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from trag1c in Is it worth learning programming? Or maybe something else?   
    Teaching everyone to write didn't put writers out of work.
  10. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from DevBlox in Is it worth learning programming? Or maybe something else?   
    Teaching everyone to write didn't put writers out of work.
  11. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from shadow_ray in Is it worth learning programming? Or maybe something else?   
    Teaching everyone to write didn't put writers out of work.
  12. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from Slottr in Is it worth learning programming? Or maybe something else?   
    Teaching everyone to write didn't put writers out of work.
  13. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from Letgomyleghoe in cat thread   
    I love cats. I want to work in an office where cats roam free.
  14. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from GAME 55 in What are some things that you feel that "they don't make them like they used to"?   
    I've wracked my brain for about five minutes and couldn't legitimately think of something. I think it's a common sentiment that's shaded by the fact older things that last are the older things that are left, while newer things that are junk are going to still be around.
     
    Several examples in this thread may suffer from this survivor bias. For example, the idea that older houses are built to last may come from a perception that only old houses actually built to last are remaining. The common pick is that tools are more cheaply produced today, and that may be true of specific brands (such as Craftsman), but I don't think is a fair comparison of a general product as a whole. Wrenches are sometimes included as an example, but there's nothing stopping you from purchasing high-end Nepros. Cars are often given as another example, but in that case the cars of today are designed to be safer with more "flimsy" materials that will accordion when involved in a collision instead of attempting to retain its rigidity.
     
    Idk man I'd have to be convinced with a good data set.
  15. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from LiberatedParrott in What are some things that you feel that "they don't make them like they used to"?   
    I've wracked my brain for about five minutes and couldn't legitimately think of something. I think it's a common sentiment that's shaded by the fact older things that last are the older things that are left, while newer things that are junk are going to still be around.
     
    Several examples in this thread may suffer from this survivor bias. For example, the idea that older houses are built to last may come from a perception that only old houses actually built to last are remaining. The common pick is that tools are more cheaply produced today, and that may be true of specific brands (such as Craftsman), but I don't think is a fair comparison of a general product as a whole. Wrenches are sometimes included as an example, but there's nothing stopping you from purchasing high-end Nepros. Cars are often given as another example, but in that case the cars of today are designed to be safer with more "flimsy" materials that will accordion when involved in a collision instead of attempting to retain its rigidity.
     
    Idk man I'd have to be convinced with a good data set.
  16. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from Haraikomono in Best software to use for coding that requires no download and is free   
    https://code.visualstudio.com/blogs/2020/12/03/chromebook-get-started
     
    That's the best I got.
  17. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from paddy-stone in What are some things that you feel that "they don't make them like they used to"?   
    I've wracked my brain for about five minutes and couldn't legitimately think of something. I think it's a common sentiment that's shaded by the fact older things that last are the older things that are left, while newer things that are junk are going to still be around.
     
    Several examples in this thread may suffer from this survivor bias. For example, the idea that older houses are built to last may come from a perception that only old houses actually built to last are remaining. The common pick is that tools are more cheaply produced today, and that may be true of specific brands (such as Craftsman), but I don't think is a fair comparison of a general product as a whole. Wrenches are sometimes included as an example, but there's nothing stopping you from purchasing high-end Nepros. Cars are often given as another example, but in that case the cars of today are designed to be safer with more "flimsy" materials that will accordion when involved in a collision instead of attempting to retain its rigidity.
     
    Idk man I'd have to be convinced with a good data set.
  18. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from gabrielcarvfer in It is hard to find 100% pure Cocoa Bars.   
    It's in the baking section.
  19. Informative
    Sakuriru got a reaction from whm1974 in It is hard to find 100% pure Cocoa Bars.   
    It's in the baking section.
  20. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from Craftyawesome in Game stop the Miners?   
    Technically if you got enough people together you could mine out enough coins to make mining unprofitable.
  21. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from wkdpaul in F*ck ChromeOS   
    Your question doesn't even make sense.
  22. Funny
    Sakuriru reacted to Murasaki in F*ck ChromeOS   
    oh ok
  23. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from bowrilla in Is JavaScript Worth it?   
    The reason Javascript's early adoption was so poor was because it was new language without a whole lot of new features, and also because of the lack of industry-accepted standardization meant that everyone was trying to their own things and push the envelope of what you can do in a web browser. When JS couldn't do it, they'd find something that could, build their own, roll their own, or use some other technology (see JScript, for instance).
     
    This is what leads to browser incompatibilities and scripts crashing. Browsers weren't mature either and back then it used to be an all in one integrated stack. Really though imo the web in general was a complete mess for a good while since it originally took off in the 90's. But that's just because stable technology couldn't keep up with innovation.
     
    The Javascript you knew is nothing like the Javascript of today, and while it may have the same syntax rules and quirks, actual web programming with it is far more complicated than you could have dreamed up in the 90's, but also much, much better with the rise of the MVC design pattern.  Most websites these days are being written using front-end frameworks like React or Vue. Modern web development requires a massive development stack and if you were interested in getting into it the learning curve is high. Not just because how so fundamentally different Javascript is than other programming languages, but because trying to solve the web problem is just that hard. People expect more and more out of web pages and developers will continue to keep delivering the content people crave. A web page that's just text and hyperlinks won't cut it anymore.
     
    The question isn't really whether or not Javascript is worth it, you don't have a choice if you're developing web technology.
  24. Informative
    Sakuriru got a reaction from whm1974 in Is JavaScript Worth it?   
    The reason Javascript's early adoption was so poor was because it was new language without a whole lot of new features, and also because of the lack of industry-accepted standardization meant that everyone was trying to their own things and push the envelope of what you can do in a web browser. When JS couldn't do it, they'd find something that could, build their own, roll their own, or use some other technology (see JScript, for instance).
     
    This is what leads to browser incompatibilities and scripts crashing. Browsers weren't mature either and back then it used to be an all in one integrated stack. Really though imo the web in general was a complete mess for a good while since it originally took off in the 90's. But that's just because stable technology couldn't keep up with innovation.
     
    The Javascript you knew is nothing like the Javascript of today, and while it may have the same syntax rules and quirks, actual web programming with it is far more complicated than you could have dreamed up in the 90's, but also much, much better with the rise of the MVC design pattern.  Most websites these days are being written using front-end frameworks like React or Vue. Modern web development requires a massive development stack and if you were interested in getting into it the learning curve is high. Not just because how so fundamentally different Javascript is than other programming languages, but because trying to solve the web problem is just that hard. People expect more and more out of web pages and developers will continue to keep delivering the content people crave. A web page that's just text and hyperlinks won't cut it anymore.
     
    The question isn't really whether or not Javascript is worth it, you don't have a choice if you're developing web technology.
  25. Agree
    Sakuriru got a reaction from LAwLz in Discord Inc is exploring a sale valuing at more than 10billion   
    I don't think that's the case. The problem with social media is that the algorithm will feed more of the content you like to consume and less of what you avoid. The end result is that you end up in your own echo chamber where most of your news or "facts" are tailored for your own consumption.
     
    When people do their "own research" they open google and type in their question and the algorithm just serves them links that fit their already established biases, regardless of whether or not it's actually true.
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