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FakeNSA

Member
  • Content Count

    554
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  • Last visited

Reputation Activity

  1. Informative
    FakeNSA reacted to Arkrim in Watercooled Hospital (Danish Article)   
    Summary
     A new "super hospital" is being built in Aalborg, Denmark with a rather interesting indoor climate solution: leading a pipe from a nearby chalk-basin to the hospital to utilize the waters cooling effect. With the ambitious goal of being the most energy efficient and climate-friendly hospital in the world, this solution should reduce CO2-emissions compared to traditional cooling by 80-90%. Quotes are translated for your convenience since the article is in Danish. 

     
    Quotes
     
    My thoughts
    Forget all about watercooling your pc's and office chairs. While i know this teeters the line between "tech" and i guess plumbing(?) the article does talk about this being a technologically driven solution. It will be interesting to see if this could start replacing the harmful air-conditioners which are so popular around the world, despite being walking-talking environmental hazards. At least if it's scalable beyond just one big building and you happen to live near a large cool body of water.
     
    Sources
    Tv2 Nord - Reputable local danish news site. Contains video of the pipe being lowered if that's of any interest.
     
  2. Agree
    FakeNSA reacted to leadeater in Apple Spring Loaded Event (April 20th, 2021) - Leaked by Siri, confirmed by Apple   
    There were Intel Xeon Xserve's, 3 generations/years of them.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xserve#Intel_Xserve
     
    They stopped when they gave up on enterprise OS management tools and moved to complete mobile OS management framework (yes Mac OS is managed as if it were a mobile device).
  3. Like
    FakeNSA got a reaction from zeusthemoose in Murica (But international) Parrot Gang   
    Totally! Rep whatever you want.
    Honestly, that looks really cool.
  4. Agree
    FakeNSA got a reaction from Eschew in Murica (But international) Parrot Gang   
    Totally! Rep whatever you want.
    Honestly, that looks really cool.
  5. Like
    FakeNSA reacted to ComradeCoconut in Murica (But international) Parrot Gang   
    Is Pakistan Parrot Allowed?
  6. Like
    FakeNSA got a reaction from CarlBar in Elon Musk's Neuralink says this monkey is playing Pong with its mind   
    Honestly, that's because we know very little about neuralink, and anything elon musk related always brings out.... shall we say, people who aren't fans of Elon. Which is fine, but results in discussions of things that aren't necessarily on topic.
  7. Like
    FakeNSA got a reaction from Eschew in Elon Musk's Neuralink says this monkey is playing Pong with its mind   
    Honestly, that's because we know very little about neuralink, and anything elon musk related always brings out.... shall we say, people who aren't fans of Elon. Which is fine, but results in discussions of things that aren't necessarily on topic.
  8. Agree
    FakeNSA got a reaction from thechinchinsong in Elon Musk's Neuralink says this monkey is playing Pong with its mind   
    Sorry to jump in here unsolicited, but this isn't quite accurate.
     
    What makes Starlink special, along with its future competitors in Kuiper and Oneweb, is that they propose a non-geostationary constellation.
    What does that mean, and why does it matter?
     
    To answer, we have to look to standard satellite providers. Today, satellite internet is provided from the geostationary band, much in the same way that you described above. However, it incurs massive latency, as the geostationary band is more than 22,000 miles above the earth, and even traveling at the speed of light, that has a guaranteed minimum of close to 300ms of ping. Once overhead is added, speaking from personal experience, the effective ping is closer to 400-500.
     
     
    So how does a non-geostationary constellation solve this? By reducing the distance! In Starlink's case, the entire constellation will be orbiting below 550 miles, with satellites actually orbiting around the earth continuously, at a 53° inclination (which can be visualized in this video). This means that theoretically, your latency to a nearby ground station could be as low as 30-50ms of latency, at much higher speeds.
     
    Plus, since each satellite is at such low altitude, they only handle a small geographic area, so (in the rural areas they are intended for), they are less likely to become seriously congested, and more satellites can be added to the chain to support a greater customer base as time goes on.
     
    Overall, while it isn't even close to fiber's ability to serve a dense customer base, it will be massively important for rural customers, and potentially open proper internet access to entire nations that otherwise might not ever be able to afford it (IE, africa), and increasing access to information and potentially education for the entire world.
     
    I hope this rant was somewhat informative! Sorry, I've been meaning to write something like this for a while, and you finally gave me an excuse to do it.
  9. Agree
    FakeNSA reacted to Ashley MLP Fangirl in NHS Covid-19 app update blocked for breaking Apple and Google's rules   
    you realize a huge part of Apple's appeal is their respect for the privacy of their users? it would be a huge blow if they simply allow government apps to track location data.
  10. Agree
    FakeNSA reacted to JoseGuya in NHS Covid-19 app update blocked for breaking Apple and Google's rules   
    It doesn't matter if the entity is private or public, this kind of data can be leaked and affect a lot of people. Actually, is even worse when is a public entity because compulsion is always an option 
  11. Agree
    FakeNSA reacted to Zodiark1593 in NHS Covid-19 app update blocked for breaking Apple and Google's rules   
    Even governments need to play by the rules. 
  12. Agree
    FakeNSA reacted to WereCatf in What is a logical amount to spend on a pc?   
    Depends on what it'll be used for, where you live and how much you can afford to spend without it impacting your ability to pay bills, buy food and all other expenses involved in your life, while also leaving you with some extra in case of emergencies.
  13. Agree
    FakeNSA reacted to Spotty in What is a logical amount to spend on a pc?   
    Really depends what you expect the PC to be capable of, however right now the price of gaming PCs is firmly dictated by the supply and cost of graphics cards.
  14. Informative
    FakeNSA reacted to captain_to_fire in Apple Spring Loaded Event (April 20th, 2021) - Leaked by Siri, confirmed by Apple   
    The M1 is already ARMv8 just like the A7 chip (iPhone 5s) in 2013, I don't think Apple will have enough time to design a new AS for the Mac based on ARMv9, unless they already had it way before ARM announced it just a few weeks ago.
     
    This is why data scientists who work using Intel Macs should skip the M1 Mac and wait for the ARMv9 refresh
  15. Like
    FakeNSA reacted to Master Disaster in Elon Musk's Neuralink says this monkey is playing Pong with its mind   
    Absolutely excellent explanation. Thanks for the correction.
  16. Agree
    FakeNSA got a reaction from dalekphalm in Elon Musk's Neuralink says this monkey is playing Pong with its mind   
    Sorry to jump in here unsolicited, but this isn't quite accurate.
     
    What makes Starlink special, along with its future competitors in Kuiper and Oneweb, is that they propose a non-geostationary constellation.
    What does that mean, and why does it matter?
     
    To answer, we have to look to standard satellite providers. Today, satellite internet is provided from the geostationary band, much in the same way that you described above. However, it incurs massive latency, as the geostationary band is more than 22,000 miles above the earth, and even traveling at the speed of light, that has a guaranteed minimum of close to 300ms of ping. Once overhead is added, speaking from personal experience, the effective ping is closer to 400-500.
     
     
    So how does a non-geostationary constellation solve this? By reducing the distance! In Starlink's case, the entire constellation will be orbiting below 550 miles, with satellites actually orbiting around the earth continuously, at a 53° inclination (which can be visualized in this video). This means that theoretically, your latency to a nearby ground station could be as low as 30-50ms of latency, at much higher speeds.
     
    Plus, since each satellite is at such low altitude, they only handle a small geographic area, so (in the rural areas they are intended for), they are less likely to become seriously congested, and more satellites can be added to the chain to support a greater customer base as time goes on.
     
    Overall, while it isn't even close to fiber's ability to serve a dense customer base, it will be massively important for rural customers, and potentially open proper internet access to entire nations that otherwise might not ever be able to afford it (IE, africa), and increasing access to information and potentially education for the entire world.
     
    I hope this rant was somewhat informative! Sorry, I've been meaning to write something like this for a while, and you finally gave me an excuse to do it.
  17. Informative
    FakeNSA got a reaction from Master Disaster in Elon Musk's Neuralink says this monkey is playing Pong with its mind   
    Sorry to jump in here unsolicited, but this isn't quite accurate.
     
    What makes Starlink special, along with its future competitors in Kuiper and Oneweb, is that they propose a non-geostationary constellation.
    What does that mean, and why does it matter?
     
    To answer, we have to look to standard satellite providers. Today, satellite internet is provided from the geostationary band, much in the same way that you described above. However, it incurs massive latency, as the geostationary band is more than 22,000 miles above the earth, and even traveling at the speed of light, that has a guaranteed minimum of close to 300ms of ping. Once overhead is added, speaking from personal experience, the effective ping is closer to 400-500.
     
     
    So how does a non-geostationary constellation solve this? By reducing the distance! In Starlink's case, the entire constellation will be orbiting below 550 miles, with satellites actually orbiting around the earth continuously, at a 53° inclination (which can be visualized in this video). This means that theoretically, your latency to a nearby ground station could be as low as 30-50ms of latency, at much higher speeds.
     
    Plus, since each satellite is at such low altitude, they only handle a small geographic area, so (in the rural areas they are intended for), they are less likely to become seriously congested, and more satellites can be added to the chain to support a greater customer base as time goes on.
     
    Overall, while it isn't even close to fiber's ability to serve a dense customer base, it will be massively important for rural customers, and potentially open proper internet access to entire nations that otherwise might not ever be able to afford it (IE, africa), and increasing access to information and potentially education for the entire world.
     
    I hope this rant was somewhat informative! Sorry, I've been meaning to write something like this for a while, and you finally gave me an excuse to do it.
  18. Like
    FakeNSA got a reaction from Eschew in Elon Musk's Neuralink says this monkey is playing Pong with its mind   
    Sorry to jump in here unsolicited, but this isn't quite accurate.
     
    What makes Starlink special, along with its future competitors in Kuiper and Oneweb, is that they propose a non-geostationary constellation.
    What does that mean, and why does it matter?
     
    To answer, we have to look to standard satellite providers. Today, satellite internet is provided from the geostationary band, much in the same way that you described above. However, it incurs massive latency, as the geostationary band is more than 22,000 miles above the earth, and even traveling at the speed of light, that has a guaranteed minimum of close to 300ms of ping. Once overhead is added, speaking from personal experience, the effective ping is closer to 400-500.
     
     
    So how does a non-geostationary constellation solve this? By reducing the distance! In Starlink's case, the entire constellation will be orbiting below 550 miles, with satellites actually orbiting around the earth continuously, at a 53° inclination (which can be visualized in this video). This means that theoretically, your latency to a nearby ground station could be as low as 30-50ms of latency, at much higher speeds.
     
    Plus, since each satellite is at such low altitude, they only handle a small geographic area, so (in the rural areas they are intended for), they are less likely to become seriously congested, and more satellites can be added to the chain to support a greater customer base as time goes on.
     
    Overall, while it isn't even close to fiber's ability to serve a dense customer base, it will be massively important for rural customers, and potentially open proper internet access to entire nations that otherwise might not ever be able to afford it (IE, africa), and increasing access to information and potentially education for the entire world.
     
    I hope this rant was somewhat informative! Sorry, I've been meaning to write something like this for a while, and you finally gave me an excuse to do it.
  19. Like
    FakeNSA got a reaction from Zulu-Cheese-Alpha-IV in Would you switch to Linux (assuming u already aren't using linux) if it had the vast selection of software that windows has?   
    I'm stuck on windows for gaming at this point, but I'm honestly considering switching my schoolwork over to wsl2, just to get away from distractions (I already have Kali set up with Kex).
    Honestly though, switching is more work than I thought!
  20. Agree
    FakeNSA reacted to dizmo in Amazon: We see you when you're Peeing, We know when you're unsafe...   
    I think the title here is very misleading, as is your thoughts on the article.
    Cameras in vehicles make sense. They're not really a violation of privacy; you don't own the vehicle, it's company property, really, you have no right to privacy within it. Drivers saying they can't find time to find a bathroom? Bullshit. Plan your life better. Public urination, in a lot of places, is illegal.
     
    If it really did reduce problems by 48%, I'm all for it.
  21. Agree
    FakeNSA reacted to RegulatorRWF in Scraped data of 500 million LinkedIn users on sale   
    If you put information onto a public profile expect that anyone who wants that data has it. This is nothing to lose sleep over IMO. Yes fake profiles can be created but that is true of any platform.
  22. Like
    FakeNSA reacted to Arika S in Microsoft is submerging servers in boiling liquid   
    No, they made that up just so they can dip their servers in a random liquid for shits and giggles.
     
    Office 365, and therefor sharepoint, goes down every few months, it's really annoying at work, so i do hope this fixes that
  23. Agree
    FakeNSA reacted to Salv8 (sam) in Elon Musk's Neuralink says this monkey is playing Pong with its mind   
    an IOT device with the ability to interface with my mind?
    this won't back fire at all!
  24. Funny
    FakeNSA reacted to piratemonkey in Yahoo Answers is shutting its down.   
    I hear if you mail 3 cookies to @wkdpaul, he will fix any of your computer problems. alternatively, you can use carrier pigeon
  25. Funny
    FakeNSA reacted to ministrsinister in Yahoo Answers is shutting its down.   
    Noooo! How will we ever find out if we are prangent? 
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