Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

LIGISTX

Member
  • Content Count

    4,682
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation Activity

  1. Agree
    LIGISTX got a reaction from jaslion in Is 750w good enough for 3080 and 10700k   
    It’ll be close. 750x is a good PSU, very good ripple control as it has caps at the end of each plug, those caps may be the saving grace that helps reduce voltage spikes from the 3080 load.
     
    Only 1 way to find out tho. Lol. 
  2. Like
    LIGISTX got a reaction from dimforest in Help me understand fans and RGB... because it's overwhelming   
    You can get 3 or 4 pin FSB splitters as well. Each mobo fan header can likely do 1 amp. So if each fan is say .25 amps, you can very safely do 3 fans off a single header. Cable Matters 2-Pack 3 Way 4 Pin PWM Fan Splitter Cable - 12 Inches https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07PXLHNZ6/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_Y4A6CMFH3W3FXK6205YE
     
    just wanted to add that detail. 
  3. Agree
    LIGISTX reacted to Eigenvektor in 1TB NVMe or 500GB NVMe + 2TB HDD?   
    If 1 TB is enough for your needs, I'd go for the larger NVMe. If you need more storage the HDD it is.
  4. Like
    LIGISTX got a reaction from rotexenv2 in installed a 360mm front radiator with tubes up   
    Whatever you like the look of better. It doesn’t make any difference for performance, longevity, or noise. 
  5. Agree
    LIGISTX got a reaction from wONKEyeYEs in installed a 360mm front radiator with tubes up   
    Not exactly… tubes down prevents air from being sucked into the line by the pump since the air will end up at the top of the radiator. With tubes up, the pump can “gurgle” air at the top of the rad. 
     
    You want the pump to be below the air level of the rad, but the tubes should be at the bottom. 
     
    Good GN video explaining it all.
     
     
  6. Agree
    LIGISTX reacted to Fedor in 24 pin power connector question   
    thank you!!! i was worried i was going to need to buy another power supply
  7. Agree
    LIGISTX got a reaction from Fasauceome in 24 pin power connector question   
    Yea, that’s normal 🙂
  8. Agree
    LIGISTX got a reaction from WereCat in 4 pin connector for my case's fan does not fit the 4 pin header on my motherboard   
    What’s in your hand is an RGB cable…. Not a fan power cable. That fan controller likely uses SATA to power it. 
  9. Agree
    LIGISTX reacted to Moonzy in im looking to build a new pc, which will last me till i die. can you see if i made the right choice   
    If you die in the next 10 years, then sure
     
    Another "hehe look at me I can sort by price and throw a list together" thread?
  10. Like
    LIGISTX got a reaction from Electronics Wizardy in TrueNAScore vs OMV vs ???   
    Its pretty cheap in the scheme of it... if it perfectly fits your use case, its well, WELL, worth it.
     
    Exactly.
     
    ZFS is fantastic, but its not for the faint of heart... 
  11. Agree
    LIGISTX reacted to Electronics Wizardy in TrueNAScore vs OMV vs ???   
    TrueNAS is basically ZFS only. 
     
    What is your drive config. ZFS works pretty well.
     
    Unraid is pretty cheap, and probably cheaper than those synology boxes. I really wouldn't worry about the software price here when your spending much more on the hardware.
  12. Agree
    LIGISTX reacted to Moonzy in I've managed to stuck my graphics card half out of the socket   
    unlock the pcie slot first, then take it out, and re-insert it
  13. Agree
    LIGISTX got a reaction from BondiBlue in How to connect 20 drives to a single pc?   
    An HBA is what you want, but you really just shouldn't do this. The cost in electricity, and the hassle of the setup just wouldn't make much sense IMO. No, electricity costs are not that high, but neither are harddrives...
     
    I could see use for the SSD's, throw the 240's in your main PC in RAID 0 as a game drive or something...
     
    What OS does your current NAS run? That would seriously determine the feasibility of this anyways. 
  14. Informative
    LIGISTX got a reaction from Zebriah in How to connect 20 drives to a single pc?   
    An HBA is what you want, but you really just shouldn't do this. The cost in electricity, and the hassle of the setup just wouldn't make much sense IMO. No, electricity costs are not that high, but neither are harddrives...
     
    I could see use for the SSD's, throw the 240's in your main PC in RAID 0 as a game drive or something...
     
    What OS does your current NAS run? That would seriously determine the feasibility of this anyways. 
  15. Agree
    LIGISTX reacted to BondiBlue in How to connect 20 drives to a single pc?   
    I wouldn't bother with that. Those 10 drives add up to a very underwhelming 5TB of RAW capacity. You can get that much storage for less than $100 these days, and using many low capacity drives adds far too many failure points unless you use RAID. Then, if you do use RAID you'll be cutting your capacity back even more. That's not even dealing with the space, heat and power consumption aspect. 
     
    If you do want to use them all then I'd just get an external enclosure like the previous reply mentioned. 
  16. Informative
    LIGISTX reacted to mariushm in PSU efficiency stuff   
    The AC voltage has to be rectified into DC using a bridge rectifier (or 2/several in parallel to reduce voltage drop and dissipate heat across rectifiers) 
    A bridge rectifier consists of 4 diode, 2 of them are always operating ... so you get some voltage drop across the diodes as input voltage is rectified.
     
    The power dissipated in the bridge rectifier will be higher at higher currents ... for example let's say to produce 400 watts to components, the power supply needs to draw 4A of current at 110v , but only 2A of current at 230v AC.
    The losses in the bridge rectifier are approximately P = 2 diodes x 1v (voltage drop on diode inside rectifier) x Current   ... so at 110v you'd have 8 watts of wasted energy, at 230v you'd have only 3-4 watts.
     
    After the AC voltage is converted to DC, that DC voltage with lots of fluctuations is boosted to around 400-420v DC using the active PFC circuit. The reason this is done is because you can store more energy in that bulk capacitor this way (giving the psu enough energy to last a few milliseconds in case there's a hiccup in the power grid) and because it makes possible to use much smaller transformers  and higher frequencies (the power supply sends tens to hundreds of thousands of 400v-ish pulses through the transformer and out comes nearly 12v DC on the other side.
     
    That active PFC circuit has lower losses if it only has to boost from around 300v  to 400-420v  compared to boosting from around 180v.
    Rectified AC has a peak of 1.414xVac so for 230v input you'll have a peak of around 325v DC and on 110v AC you'd have a peak of around 175v DC.
     
    So the two above are just two of the reasons why running a power supply with a higher input AC voltage results in much higher efficiency.
     
     
    Fun fact .. There are ICs which rectify AC voltage using mosfets instead of diodes, so the losses are much lower ... like orders of magnitude lower, depending on what mosfets you choose.
    For example see LT4320 : https://www.analog.com/media/en/technical-documentation/data-sheets/4320fb.pdf
     
    Problem is a lot of these including the above can't handle high voltages, the above only goes up to 72v DC so you can't rectify the 230v input of a psu.  But they're useful for example if you make a class D or class AB audio amplifier that run on 24-48v DC ... such chips help save 5-10 watts of heat which means you can use smaller heatsinks in such audio amplifiers or cheaper bulk capacitors.
     
    There's also a class of power supplies that don't use bridge rectifiers to rectify the AC voltage to DC ...they use some other techniques to convert to DC and boost to high voltage... but it's hard for me to explain how they do it.
     
     
  17. Agree
    LIGISTX reacted to tkitch in Need to connect home theater with arc   
    No, you have no options.
     
    You can run it in 2.1 input, and that's it.  It's not a receiver, so it won't do anything better.
     

     
  18. Like
    LIGISTX reacted to BaconLordPlayz in I screwed up taking out my GPU, now there is no power   
    Well I feel pretty stupid about this one. Yes this was the issue. I got freaked out because of the whole GPU situation and I did not want to touch the motherboard and cause more damage. Thank you for the help.
  19. Agree
    LIGISTX got a reaction from Mark Kaine in I screwed up taking out my GPU, now there is no power   
    The PC won’t turn on just from flipping the PSU switch to on. You also have to tell the mobo it’s go time (usually with the case power button… or you can just short the header). 
  20. Informative
    LIGISTX got a reaction from RuizLire in One or two NVME   
    Totally up to you. Performance wise there is effectively no difference. 
  21. Agree
    LIGISTX got a reaction from Tan3l6 in One or two NVME   
    Totally up to you. Performance wise there is effectively no difference. 
  22. Agree
    LIGISTX reacted to Middcore in Could this have fried my motherboard?   
    The CMOS is a tiny amount of storage that is used to retain the BIOS settings. Resetting it in your case requires bridging two pins there for this express purpose on your motherboard, as explained on page 22 of the board's manual. 
     
    I'm sure the board is fine though, UD stands for "ultra durable" hahahahahahahahaha
  23. Like
    LIGISTX got a reaction from Imperialdramon in Why are Supermicro Server Chassis So Expensive?   
    Typically you can find then used on eBay for a good price with mobo, CPU and RAM, but right now they are hard to come by. 
  24. Agree
    LIGISTX got a reaction from Middcore in I’m completely stumped and I’m regretting trying to build my own PC   
    Yes… they sometimes tuck the wire bundle into a CD or HDD bay. They are there, unless someone cut them out or the case wasn’t assembled properly. They are usually soldered and glued on the case side……… they don’t come apart easily.
     
    If you want to see if your PC works, you don’t even need the power button plugged in. If the PSU is flipped on, and everything is plugged in (CPU, RAM, heatsinks etc) you can just use a screw driver to bridge the power pins on the motherboard and it will start. All the power switch does it complete a circuit, a screwdriver or any metal object will complete the circuit just the same. But, that not a great way to turn your PC on every time… the wires in the case somewhere im sure. 
  25. Agree
×