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Mira Yurizaki

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  1. Agree
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from TechyBen in New 'CacheOut' attack targets Intel processors, with a fix arriving soon   
    Zen is a relatively new microarchitecture on the floor to poke at, and few companies are using AMD's older processors in any serious capacity any more so there's no real point in poking at them. It may be nice to poke at once you found something in a newer product, but that's about it. Intel, IBM, and ARM have likely been building on top of their older designs and the mantra of "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" applies. AMD built Zen pretty much from the ground up. Plus innocuous things may not look like a problem or may be glanced over. Heartbleed was in the OpenSSL code for two years before someone finally pointed it out. Two years, and it's open source software.
  2. Funny
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from matrix07012 in How to annoy hundreds of developers in all 50 states - Vermont bill would allow Emojis in license plates   
    Whatever happened to trying to be clever:

  3. Funny
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from GOTSpectrum in How to annoy hundreds of developers in all 50 states - Vermont bill would allow Emojis in license plates   
    Whatever happened to trying to be clever:

  4. Funny
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from Giganthrax in How to annoy hundreds of developers in all 50 states - Vermont bill would allow Emojis in license plates   
    Whatever happened to trying to be clever:

  5. Agree
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from mr moose in New 'CacheOut' attack targets Intel processors, with a fix arriving soon   
    Zen is a relatively new microarchitecture on the floor to poke at, and few companies are using AMD's older processors in any serious capacity any more so there's no real point in poking at them. It may be nice to poke at once you found something in a newer product, but that's about it. Intel, IBM, and ARM have likely been building on top of their older designs and the mantra of "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" applies. AMD built Zen pretty much from the ground up. Plus innocuous things may not look like a problem or may be glanced over. Heartbleed was in the OpenSSL code for two years before someone finally pointed it out. Two years, and it's open source software.
  6. Agree
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from ARikozuM in Texas Instruments - TI84 Plus Locking Options?   
    I don't think there's anything you can do. The calculator is running such a basic OS that it's unlikely you can implement security features. Or even if you could, they're easily circumvented.
  7. Like
    Mira Yurizaki reacted to SteveGrabowski0 in Now in 2020, has RT become very worthwhile to you?   
    I phrased that wrong. I mean RTX being a bust for the kind of hardware and games we have right now, at least in the $500 price range.  I don't think there is anyone who isn't excited about what it can eventually do for games when you can use laws of optics instead of hacks that fake it to light scenes. 
  8. Agree
    Mira Yurizaki reacted to mr moose in New 'CacheOut' attack targets Intel processors, with a fix arriving soon   
    Most likely because Intel's topology goes right back 20 plus years in some of it's products,  and it has taken the better part of a decade to find most of the vulnerabilities.  AMD had a 5 year absence form the market which effectively means noone is looking at their older stuff and Ryzen hasn't been around long enough to have anywhere near the same time span or product updates to work through.
  9. Like
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from SteveGrabowski0 in Now in 2020, has RT become very worthwhile to you?   
    It's hard to tell when we're still on the first generation of hardware.
     
    I'm going to keep telling people to look at past versions of DirectX, what they brought, what impact they had on first generation hardware, and how long it took for them to get up to speed. Almost everything had issues similar to what we're seeing with DXR when you tried to take advantage of the new fangled feature(s) on first generation hardware. It wasn't until the second or third generation of hardware before things settled down.
     
    It also doesn't even have to be an API or new feature of the API. Ambient occlusion was receiving similar flak for a few years after it made its debut and now everyone says to turn it on because it's not that expensive to do so and it provides more depth to the image quality: https://linustechtips.com/main/profile/359972-mira-yurizaki/?status=215654&type=status
     
    Maybe in another 5 or so years we can revisit this and see where it's at.
  10. Informative
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from SteveGrabowski0 in Now in 2020, has RT become very worthwhile to you?   
    I'm still building a library of the games that have it, but so far I have:
    Battlefield V, which I did spend a lot of time ogling at the reflections whenever I could Quake II RTX, probably the one I've played around with the most Shadow of the Tomb Raider, haven't touched it yet I'll probably pick up Metro Exodus once it loses its ESG exclusivity and Control at some point. If anything though, it's not really the RT that tickles me more than annoyance I get from lighting artifacts that pure raster rendering still produces on top of the limitations of screen-space reflections.
     
    However, I also believe that the ray tracing part of Turing is overshadowed by its other, potentially powerful features like:
    The INT and FP core split Variable rate shading (which I think combined with image sharpening, which is basically a free filter, would really be a game changer) Mesh shaders And from 3DMark's DLSS test, I think DLSS does greatly enhance the RT, because it smooths out the noise even more.
     
    Honestly though, everything that Turing introduced likely won't be mainstream until another two or three generations. It took that long for DX9 to be finally dropped after DX10 was a thing and I'd say about that long before DX10 support was finally dropped in favor of DX11 only. Which, as a broken record, DX10 and DX11 also had performance hurting features, with DX10 being as bad as DXR in a lot of cases (and worse yet, not a whole lot of obvious image quality improvements)
     
    EDIT:
    Something to add, it's possible to get RTX features, maximum quality settings (except maximum texture quality due to VRAM capacity), at 1440p, and achieve 60FPS on average on a 2060 Super:
     
  11. Funny
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from illegalwater in How to annoy hundreds of developers in all 50 states - Vermont bill would allow Emojis in license plates   
    Whatever happened to trying to be clever:

  12. Agree
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from NewMaxx in Will my motherboard bottleneck this M.2 NVMe SSD?   
    If you're using this as a single-user OS drive, the limited bandwidth isn't going to make a practical difference.
  13. Like
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from GDRRiley in Worth Buying now 2080ti?!   
    Probably not, because MSRP doesn't really drop all that much, if ever, on older generations.
     
    And if performance trends continue, the 70 or 80 cards in the next series will be about where the 2080 Super and 2080 Ti are now for less.
  14. Like
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from Fasauceome in Worth Buying now 2080ti?!   
    Probably not, because MSRP doesn't really drop all that much, if ever, on older generations.
     
    And if performance trends continue, the 70 or 80 cards in the next series will be about where the 2080 Super and 2080 Ti are now for less.
  15. Agree
    Mira Yurizaki reacted to greenhorn in are magnets bad for computers?   
    Don't worry, if the magnetic holder sticks to the case, the magnetic field lines will mostly go through the case because it is ferromagnetic. It has a much higher permeability than the surrounding air.

    If you were to stick a magnet to the outside of an HDD, I wouldn't be worried too much (unless you have a crazy strong magnet), because the HDD's hull should be designed to shield the inside to some degree.

    The only way a conventional magnet could do some harm is if movement is involved (either by the magnet itself or an electrically conductive material nearby) because of eddy currents. You could probably mess up some fans with strong and correctly placed magnets (not likely to happen by accident).
  16. Agree
    Mira Yurizaki reacted to NumLock21 in Now in 2020, has RT become very worthwhile to you?   
    Most of today's triple A titles look so good to being with, it's really difficult to tell if RT is actually there or not, unless you're trying to look really hard, just to spot the difference. Does that mean to avoid current cards with RT, not at all. It all depends your current card and are you satisfied with the performance you're getting. Get the card you think it's best for you. Do not get persuaded by what everyone else is saying, because at the very end, it's you who is going to use that PC not someone else.
     
     
  17. Agree
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from leadeater in GN: How AMD Sabotages Itself & Its Partners   
    Maybe not happy, but they're willing.
     
    And besides, the market was willing to buy high-end cards inflated by $100-$200 from scalpers.
  18. Like
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from Taf the Ghost in Intel drops PCIe 4.0 support for Comet Lake Desktop   
    I think patent extensions only apply to food/drug related products considering USPTO does have a list of patents that were extended and it looks like all of them are food/drug related.
     
    Steamboat Willie's copyright is going to expire in 2023 anyway (US copyright law says 120 years after creation or 95 years after publication, whichever is shorter)
     
    But they have a hold on Mickey Mouse until the end of time because the character is now considered a trademark, not a copyrighted work.
  19. Like
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from IAmAndre in Need suggestion   
    Read books related to the topic. Books like:
    The Mythical Man Month The Art of Readable Code: Simple and Practical Techniques for Writing Better Code Code Simplicity: The Fundamentals of Software Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability Even though this specifically talks about web sites, it can apply in general The Design of Everyday Things Not programming related, but immensely useful to read because a lot of its topics are applicable The Old New Thing: Practical Development Throughout the Evolution of Windows I like this because it demystifies a lot of things that go on in a large software company.
  20. Agree
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from Arrogath in Help with circuit   
    Go with a higher voltage, because this means less amps are required to drive the thing at the rated power you want. More amps means you need beefier cables.
     
    You can find 12V power supplies with the typical barrel connector, so use that as your power input to the system. And while the minimum amount of current you need for a 12V power supply to produce 100W is about 8.3A, you should get something that produces more as a buffer. So something more like 10A or 12.5A.
     
    Going with USB will not work because it's typically 1A-2A at 5V. You could up the power output by going with USB-PD, but this requires some know-how to safely tell a USB-PD based charger to increase said power.
  21. Agree
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from leadeater in Intel drops PCIe 4.0 support for Comet Lake Desktop   
    Considering that on a 30,000 foot level, Intel's and AMD's platforms are basically the same, just swap the socket and the chipset (yes I know there would be different pin counts), it wouldn't surprise me that they're recycling the designs.
  22. Like
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from seee the state im in nooow in Intel drops PCIe 4.0 support for Comet Lake Desktop   
    Considering that on a 30,000 foot level, Intel's and AMD's platforms are basically the same, just swap the socket and the chipset (yes I know there would be different pin counts), it wouldn't surprise me that they're recycling the designs.
  23. Like
    Mira Yurizaki reacted to seee the state im in nooow in Intel drops PCIe 4.0 support for Comet Lake Desktop   
    the Wafer Eater has spoken
  24. Like
    Mira Yurizaki reacted to Mooshi in Fry's Electronic Store Closures Confirmed   
    My Fry's is a grocery store ??
  25. Like
    Mira Yurizaki got a reaction from Bombastinator in Some RTX 2060's have up to 47% better productivity performance in apps like Blender and Solid Edge   
    I'm going to take a stab at this, but it probably isn't enough to explain what's going on.
     
    The TU-106 and TU-104 dies do have a difference, the TU-106 has 12 SMs per GPC (3 total), whereas the TU-104 has 8 SMs per GPC (6 total). Each GPC also has its own raster unit. Given that TU-106-200 used in the RTX 2060 and the TU-104-150 used in the RTX 2060 KO have the same number of SMs, 30 in this case, this means that the RTX 2060 KO has to have another GPC, which means it has to have another raster unit.
     
    I don't know if this helps with these workloads, but that's the biggest difference I'm seeing between the TU-106-200 and the TU-104-150
     
    EDIT: Image references:
     
    EDIT 2: Also another musing, but I believe the 2060 KO only seemed to show noticeable improvements in professional/workstation software. IIRC, those types of software heavily favor geometry processing over pixel shading. And since raster engines deal with processing triangles into pixels, the higher performing card having more of them would to me make sense.
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