Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

mariushm

Member
  • Content Count

    11,157
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    mariushm got a reaction from panzersharkcat in Why don't we have more choices when it comes to operating systems?   
    Because operating systems are extremely complex and nobody's gonna use them if there are no applications written for them.
    You can't make an operating system that supports existing applications because of patents and for other reasons...
  2. Like
    mariushm got a reaction from Alexeygridnev1993 in Why don't we have more choices when it comes to operating systems?   
    Because operating systems are extremely complex and nobody's gonna use them if there are no applications written for them.
    You can't make an operating system that supports existing applications because of patents and for other reasons...
  3. Informative
    mariushm got a reaction from Ridska in Need help hunting down an IC datasheet and store   
    You can buy it from here : https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/njr-corporation-njrc/NJM4580D/673772
     
    and from other stores, findchips.com search : NJM4580D Stock and Price by Distributor
     
    These would probably be compatible (not sure, not thoroughly reviewed specs), but they need higher minimum voltages (4580 seems to work from +/- 2v , 2068 needs at least +/- 3v and 5532 at least +/- 4v - your 4580 may run at 5v (+/- 2.5v) in which case the ones below may not work :
    NJM2068D NJR Corporation/NJRC | Integrated Circuits (ICs) | DigiKey
    NJM5532D NJR Corporation/NJRC | Integrated Circuits (ICs) | DigiKey
  4. Like
    mariushm got a reaction from chensov in Static electricity: does it matter?   
    Videos are EDITED. They may discharge by touching something grounded before camera rolls
    A psu plugged in mains is grounded touching the metal of psu discharges you. Psu mounted to case means case is grounded touching unpainted bits discharges you...
     
    People also know how to handle parts ... Fingers on edges or grounded metal parts, not touching exposed metal contacts or pins
     
  5. Like
    mariushm got a reaction from Mister Woof in 12+2 or 8+2 on motherboard   
    This is not something you should focus on, and it's really irrelevant.
    The actual number is pointless...  for example, it could be 8  x 70A power stages, for a total of 560A peak current,  versus 12 x 40A stages, for a total of 480A peak current .. .12+2 looks good on paper, for marketing reasons, but no guarantee it's better.
     
    It could also be 8 real power stages, versus 12 as in 6 doubled  power stages ... which makes a very tiny difference, almost not worth discussing.
     
    And last, unless you plan to buy a 10+ core processor, anything higher than 6 power stages on modern motherboards won't give you any benefits besides slightly cooler VRM.
     
     
  6. Like
    mariushm got a reaction from bryantheone in smd capacitor fell off from my motherboard!!!   
    The chip near those surface mounted capacitors is the audio chip (ALC662)... those capacitors are either for smoothing power going into the sound chip or for decoupling the audio channels ... if the first, the audio chip may randomly glitch or restart (you would get error messages in windows saying a device has restarted or something like that). if the later, you may not hear sound in one channel, or you may only get audio in one channel when recording from microphone or line in.  They could be for front panel audio connector channels (headphones or microphone jacks)
     
    If you get a lot of errors or some serious stuff in windows, you can go in bios and disable the onboard audio and buy a separate sound card - usb sound card or a pci-e x1 sound cards if the video card doesn't block the slot.
  7. Like
    mariushm got a reaction from Tristerin in 23 Pins?   
    The connector has 24 pins.
    The one missing is -5v, which was present in ISA slots (the ones before AGP and conventional PCI).  On ISA slots, it was used on fax modems and audio amplifiers on sound cards. Nowadays, it's no longer needed so it's removed from specification and therefore the wire is missing.
    There's another wire which may be gone in the future, which is for -12v - that's only used for serial ports which are still used to communicate with various things like network switches, telecommunication equipment, point of sale devices.
     
    A lot of headers on motherboards have a pin missing, that's the case with USB headers. The reason for that is so that you won't insert the plug the wrong way - usually the matching hole in the plug is filled with something, so that if you try to insert the plug the wrong way, the pin on the header can't go in the filled hole in the plug.
    Your blue usb 3 plugs don't have that hole filled because the header is keyed using the plastic walls of the header.
     
    You can get a flathead screwdriver or a ruler or a credit card and gently and carefully apply some sideway pressure on the pins to align them and straighten them. Then, you can carefully slide down that plastic housing over the pins in the header.
     
  8. Informative
    mariushm got a reaction from bruh11111 in Cryptocurrency info?   
    Price of bitcoin and other coins MAY drop ... but a large part of the miners will continue to mine, because even at lower price they make coins and a lot of them don't pay for electricity or pay a very low amount so it's still profitable
    So instead of selling the coins, they'll just keep them until the prices go up again in 1-2 years.
     
    Mining can damage the cards if the miners do heavy overclocks on the ram to increase the mining profitability and don't keep the cards cooled well. A miner will typically downclock the gpu chip to reduce power consumption, but they'll overclock the ra on the video card ... and if the ram is not kept cool, it can degrade over time.
     
  9. Agree
    mariushm got a reaction from gabrielcarvfer in PC dead after following LTT build guide bios settings   
    Leave it on black screen for 1-2 minutes.
    If you still no luck, unplug power supply, remove battery from motherboard, wait 10-30s , put battery back, try again.
    Resetting the bios may switch back to integrated graphics, if the processor has integrated graphics - don't think 10400f has integrated graphics but not sure.
    Still no luck .... remove memory sticks and plug just one, forcing the video card to re-detect the memory
    if still no luck, probably the bios is corrupted or something like that, which means you'd have to flash the bios again... and I doubt that motherboard has bios flashback features. would really suck if this is the case, as it should happen extremely rarely.
     
  10. Informative
    mariushm got a reaction from Mark Kaine in 24 pin power cable?   
    For backwards compatibility, some power supplies have a 24 pin connector that can be split into 20 + 4 - you plug both connectors into the 24pin header in this case.
     
    The ATX standard originally had only 20 pins and had a lot of 3.3v and 5v wires, because almost all components in computers were powered from 5v or less ... all except fans and hard drive motors. So in the 20 pin connector, there's only ONE 12v wire, for around 100 watts of power maximum.
    The 4 pin segment was added to provide an extra wire for each 3.3v, 5v and 12v, when the transition was made to power processors from the 12v input. At that time they also invented the CPU 4 pin power connector, and now the EPS (cpu 8 pin) is used, imported from server motherboards.
     
    The side going into the power supply is not standardized, so each manufacturer can use their own header or headers - sometimes it makes sense to split the 24pin into 2 x 12 for example, or 1x10 + 1 x16 , in case the psu side has extra wires (voltage sense wires for example, used to measure the voltages at the motherboard header)
  11. Informative
    mariushm got a reaction from nadgob73 in Recording Codec Help/ Editing   
    AVI is not a codec, it's a container like MP4 , MKV
    In the container, you can use various codecs to compress the video content and the audio content. Your file size was super large because Bandicam probably either chose no codec (lossess, lik saving a series of bmp pictures) or chose a default codec with very small compression.
    There are lossless codecs which can do good compression, probably one of the best these days if MagicYUV : https://www.magicyuv.com/ - the FREE version is fine for your needs. Other lossless codecs that are well known are HuffYUV or Lagarith.  So you have to go in Bandicam, choose AVI and then choose the codec and its options.
     
     
    These codecs will use CPU to compress the captured data, so the games will have less CPU for themselves, so you'll get less FPS.
     
    I'd suggest giving up Bandicam and going with OBS. 
    You have the choice of sticking with software compression (using x264 to compress captured stuff to h264 with your own settings) or you can use hardware compression and choose some preset that's very high quality, like 40-60 mbps, resulting in a bit lossy but quite high quality captured stuff. 
    With the software option, you can configure x264 to use very little cpu but produce high size files, but would still be smaller than lossless avi files.  For example, you may get around 100 GB for one hour of 1080p content instead of 250 GB per hour.
     
    If you're interested about that, I can give you more details, but basically it's just using proper custom parameters for the x264 software encoder in the obs configuration.
     
     
  12. Agree
    mariushm got a reaction from AbydosOne in UPS Fan swap problem   
    The Noctua fans consume much less power, only 0.84 watts says the website.  That's 0.84 / 12 = 0.07 A
    The stock fans say up to 0.5A ... that's almost 7 times more power consumption.
     
    The UPS probably monitors the current consumption of the fans and if it's below some threshold, it triggers the warning.
    IF this is the case, you have options ... either add something that consumes power (for example a led or a resistor, but a resistor would make only heat) or you could try to tweak the current sensing to trick the ups into thinking more power in consumed.
    Tricking the sensor would involve replacing some resistors inside the ups.
     
    You didn't post schematics of the UPS, you didn't post pictures of the circuit board, you didn't even say how many wires the fans have (i guessed 2 from pictures but who knows).  If there's a rpm wire, could be the ups complains about rpm speed being too low.
     
    Also, the UPS has that high power fan for a reason, to blow a lot of air through the internals while the batteries are charged (after they discharged during a power failure)
    A lot of UPSes have the charging circuitry undersized and designed to only work for short periods of times (8-12h then not work for days) and have small heatsinks that rely on the heavy air flow to keep the components within acceptable limits.
     
    You changed the fan from one that probably pushes 2-3x the amount of air (at 3-6000 rpm) compared to the noctua that peaks at 2000 rpm - don't be surprised if your batteries go bad within a year due to overheating, if you have power failures often..
  13. Agree
    mariushm got a reaction from Levent in If I just plug and play my ram... efficient?   
    Your ram probably runs at the default 2133 or 2400 Mhz
    Go in BIOS and look for the XMP / DOCP or whatever is called, and select 3200 Mhz from the list.
    If it doesn't work for some reason, go back in bios and select 2933 Mhz or 3000 Mhz or whatever option is less than 3200 Mhz in that selection menu.
     
    Probably doesn't solve the stutter / lag, but it will give you maybe 2-3%, probably more, boost in games.
  14. Agree
    mariushm got a reaction from Glenwing in Possible to add "VESA DSC" through firmware update?   
    There has to be hardware support in the chip that decodes the digital signal from your video card. 
    It is possible for a chip to have that functionality but the firmware didn't implement it yet, but often it's not implemented because it's buggy or something like that, requiring a new hardware revision of the chip to work right.
     
  15. Informative
    mariushm got a reaction from Mark Kaine in How to Lose 100TB of Data: A Guide to My $2000 Mistake   
    If you just shoved 12v on the 5v input, there's a decent chance you can repair the drives.
    Often there's a tiny component by the power input which acts as a fuse and blows up... you can simply desolder that component and replace it  or just not install anything (if it's a zener diode) or just have a blob of solder or a wire there to override it.
     
    That's... 5 minutes for each drive with a soldering iron to fix.
     
    Worst case scenario, 12v got to the actual chips blowing them up, in which case you could in theory buy some faulty drives and transplant the chips to your drives.
     
    Someone like Louis Rossman could probably make you a deal and repair them all for a big discount, since you know the reason and most likely all drives will have same failure reason so once one is diagnosed repairing the others won't take a lot of diagnostic time.
    Would probably cost you at least $3-500 if they don't have to buy other drives to harvest components from other drives.
     
    ps can you take as clear as possible pictures of your circuit boards on the broken drives?  if they're the same, 1-2 pictures is enough.
  16. Informative
    mariushm got a reaction from Stahlmann in Possible to add "VESA DSC" through firmware update?   
    There has to be hardware support in the chip that decodes the digital signal from your video card. 
    It is possible for a chip to have that functionality but the firmware didn't implement it yet, but often it's not implemented because it's buggy or something like that, requiring a new hardware revision of the chip to work right.
     
  17. Agree
    mariushm got a reaction from Kilrah in Can I harm my Video Card (Nvidia 1660 something-or-other 6GB) by putting Kaptop tape on the bare solder to stop short circuits?   
    wall of text ... not gonna read that.
     
    There's a small risk of chips overheating, if you cover them in kapton tape. The package surface no longer gets a bit of airflow over it, helping with the cooling ... but if those chips are so hot to the point that lack of natural air convection would kill them, they needed heatsinks in the first place.
     
  18. Agree
    mariushm got a reaction from Levent in Can I harm my Video Card (Nvidia 1660 something-or-other 6GB) by putting Kaptop tape on the bare solder to stop short circuits?   
    wall of text ... not gonna read that.
     
    There's a small risk of chips overheating, if you cover them in kapton tape. The package surface no longer gets a bit of airflow over it, helping with the cooling ... but if those chips are so hot to the point that lack of natural air convection would kill them, they needed heatsinks in the first place.
     
  19. Like
    mariushm got a reaction from Spotty in How to Lose 100TB of Data: A Guide to My $2000 Mistake   
    If you just shoved 12v on the 5v input, there's a decent chance you can repair the drives.
    Often there's a tiny component by the power input which acts as a fuse and blows up... you can simply desolder that component and replace it  or just not install anything (if it's a zener diode) or just have a blob of solder or a wire there to override it.
     
    That's... 5 minutes for each drive with a soldering iron to fix.
     
    Worst case scenario, 12v got to the actual chips blowing them up, in which case you could in theory buy some faulty drives and transplant the chips to your drives.
     
    Someone like Louis Rossman could probably make you a deal and repair them all for a big discount, since you know the reason and most likely all drives will have same failure reason so once one is diagnosed repairing the others won't take a lot of diagnostic time.
    Would probably cost you at least $3-500 if they don't have to buy other drives to harvest components from other drives.
     
    ps can you take as clear as possible pictures of your circuit boards on the broken drives?  if they're the same, 1-2 pictures is enough.
  20. Agree
    mariushm got a reaction from Aero_db in How to Lose 100TB of Data: A Guide to My $2000 Mistake   
    If you just shoved 12v on the 5v input, there's a decent chance you can repair the drives.
    Often there's a tiny component by the power input which acts as a fuse and blows up... you can simply desolder that component and replace it  or just not install anything (if it's a zener diode) or just have a blob of solder or a wire there to override it.
     
    That's... 5 minutes for each drive with a soldering iron to fix.
     
    Worst case scenario, 12v got to the actual chips blowing them up, in which case you could in theory buy some faulty drives and transplant the chips to your drives.
     
    Someone like Louis Rossman could probably make you a deal and repair them all for a big discount, since you know the reason and most likely all drives will have same failure reason so once one is diagnosed repairing the others won't take a lot of diagnostic time.
    Would probably cost you at least $3-500 if they don't have to buy other drives to harvest components from other drives.
     
    ps can you take as clear as possible pictures of your circuit boards on the broken drives?  if they're the same, 1-2 pictures is enough.
  21. Agree
    mariushm got a reaction from DailyProcrastinator in Is there any way to combine two graphics cards vram?   
    No, it's not possible.  Unless the software can detect both cards and run some things on one card and other things on the second card.
     
     
  22. Informative
    mariushm got a reaction from Dumb guy in My cable is gonna melt :( plz help   
    The video card may or may not pool the power together.
    The card has two main dc-dc converters, one that powers the gpu chip (let's say 100 watts) and one that powers the ram on the video card (let's say 10-20 watts).
    Each dc-dc converter  can have one or more phases - think of it like cylinders on a car, and each phase can be powered from various sources .. think of power like squirts of gasoline being injected into the cylinders.
     
    So in the case of your video card, the gpu dc-dc converter may have 5 phases, and 2 out of 5 phases may be connected to the pci-e slot, and the other 3 are connected to the pci-e 6 pin connector.
    So those 100 watts the gpu need are split into 40w to slot, and 60w to pci-e 6pin...
     
    Anyway ... each molex connector is rated for up to 5A of current .. or 5x12v = 60 watts. So if you have a 2 x molex -> 1 x 6-8 pin pci-e adapter, it should be fairly safe to use, as those 65w are split between 2 molex connectors.
     
  23. Agree
    mariushm got a reaction from Ash_Kechummm in Recording Codec Help/ Editing   
    AVI YV12  and AVI RGB24 are uncompressed formats.
     
    If I remember correctly, YV12 makes groups of 4 pixels, and uses 6 bytes to store the information about that: 1 byte for brightness information for each pixel so 4 bytes in total,  then 2 bytes with color information (the color info is shared between the 4 pixels, so you lose some color information, it's not 100% lossless)
     
    So a 1920x1080 picture will use 1920x1080 / 4 (groups of 4 pixels) * 6 (bytes for each group of pixels) =  3,110,400 bytes per frame ... 60 frames per second  = 60 x 3,110,400 = 186,624,000 bytes per second = 178 MB per second.
    So an hour would take 3600 seconds x 178 MB = 640 GB ...
     
    RGB24 stores 3 bytes per pixel, red, green and blue for each pixel, so it will use more bytes per frame.
     
    MPEG1 is very fast but is bad for near lossless, as it was not designed for that ... think of it like a codec designed to be like when you save JPG pictures (to lose some detail while still giving good quality), but because it was designed decades ago when computers were much slower, it's simply not designed to retain a lot of quality,  think of it like you have a quality slider for quality between 1% and 100% but mpeg's maximum quality is something like 70%, you can't do better. 
     
    XVID is h263 or mpeg4 asp, what was before mpeg4 avc / h264, and it's much better than mpeg1 and good for lossy compression, but not optimized for more than SD content (less than 1280x720)... it will still work well with HD but you get better results with h264.
    XVID has a lossy mode which has better quality than mpeg1 and also has a "near lossless" mode which can compress your frames in an almost lossless mode, basically visually not noticeable. You can use its settings to trade cpu usage for bigger file sizes but the cpu usage is still quite a bit high.
    Problem with xvid / mpeg4 asp is that it's not that well supported by editors.
     
    h264 is your best choice especially if you use OBS and use hardware encoder in your video card to capture, because you don't use any cpu. You can configure the hardware encoder to make bigger files retaining as much quality as possible - if you go with a high bitrate like let's say 60-100 mbps (around 1 GB per minute of video) you'll probably get the maximum quality the hardware encoder can offer.  It won't be lossless, but considering that Youtube will recompress your video anyway, and that you'll send a compressed video to Youtube in the first place, it's debatable if you really need near lossless or lossless video as source. 
     
    The software encoder x264 can be used in OBS and this uses strictly the cpu to encode the video so it will use cpu usage, but it's more versatile. You can configure it to be true lossless (but the format used is not so well supported by editors, so not recommended), it can be near lossless (visually lossless, but probably around half the size of uncompressed video) or you can configure the amount of quality you want to keep. Also has loads of parameters that you can tweak to trade cpu usage for bigger file sizes.
     
  24. Like
    mariushm got a reaction from Electronics Wizardy in Recording Codec Help/ Editing   
    AVI is not a codec, it's a container like MP4 , MKV
    In the container, you can use various codecs to compress the video content and the audio content. Your file size was super large because Bandicam probably either chose no codec (lossess, lik saving a series of bmp pictures) or chose a default codec with very small compression.
    There are lossless codecs which can do good compression, probably one of the best these days if MagicYUV : https://www.magicyuv.com/ - the FREE version is fine for your needs. Other lossless codecs that are well known are HuffYUV or Lagarith.  So you have to go in Bandicam, choose AVI and then choose the codec and its options.
     
     
    These codecs will use CPU to compress the captured data, so the games will have less CPU for themselves, so you'll get less FPS.
     
    I'd suggest giving up Bandicam and going with OBS. 
    You have the choice of sticking with software compression (using x264 to compress captured stuff to h264 with your own settings) or you can use hardware compression and choose some preset that's very high quality, like 40-60 mbps, resulting in a bit lossy but quite high quality captured stuff. 
    With the software option, you can configure x264 to use very little cpu but produce high size files, but would still be smaller than lossless avi files.  For example, you may get around 100 GB for one hour of 1080p content instead of 250 GB per hour.
     
    If you're interested about that, I can give you more details, but basically it's just using proper custom parameters for the x264 software encoder in the obs configuration.
     
     
  25. Agree
    mariushm got a reaction from leadeater in Windows 10 bug corrupts your hard drive on seeing this file's icon.   
    You can delete those using UNC paths .... something like  \\?\\c:\folder\filename.extension
     
    It's also useful when you need to rename a file because you can't delete it otherwise due to the total file path being bigger than around 250 characters.
     
     
×