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akio123008

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  1. Agree
    akio123008 reacted to trag1c in Socketed GPU?   
    I am not the least bit on board with this guys socket idea but he is correct in saying that power supply amperage value is the maximum number of amps that can be drawn from it within the thermal constraints of the design.  At the end of the day Ohms law doesn't lie, I = V / R. The voltage out of your power supply will be constant so the only thing that can change the current draw is the resistance which is also constant because the resistance is determined by the sum of the series parallel resistance of the entire device.
     
    TLDR; PS amp rating =/= current draw. The only 2 ways to change current draw are to increase voltage and/or decrease resistance. 
     
    (Every thing here assumes theoretical speak. Real world issues would persist but for the basis of this conversation it is not needed.) 
  2. Like
    akio123008 got a reaction from ALiAli123 in 600va/360w UPS with PC consumption 450w . is this a problem ?   
    I don't want to hijack this thread, but can I take this opportunity to ask why so many people seem to use this "VA = W x 2" number? (although in this case that's not quite the case, but still quite close)
     
    To address the question; 600VA is enough to cover 450W. The power factor of a computer is easily 99%. You're fine.
  3. Informative
    akio123008 got a reaction from LogicalDrm in Electirity, wall plug with no ground/earth   
    If it's really a proper ground you should be able to touch it safely.
     
    It's quite difficult to do that though; most ground poles are driven very deep, preferably into groundwater as well.
     
    Still, a crappy ground is better than no ground, and it may just discharge the case enough to stop you getting those annoying shocks. Therefore as long as you don't treat it as an actual safety ground, I approve of this idea 🙂
     
  4. Agree
    akio123008 reacted to LogicalDrm in Electirity, wall plug with no ground/earth   
    -> Moved to Power Supplies
    ***
     
    If you would be on ground floor, running cable to actual metal rod and stucking it to actual ground could be dirty solution. Just making clear that no one would accidentally touch it.
  5. Agree
    akio123008 got a reaction from socialbeaver in Electirity, wall plug with no ground/earth   
    The feeling could be annoying, but it's not dangerous. It has not much to do with "dirty power" as you may suspect, it's simply due to how the power supply of the device you use is wired. Even on perfectly clean power this can happen.
     
    The way to deal with this problem is to somehow ground the equipment. You mentioned there's essentially no way of doing this, but I suggest you have another look to make sure because this is really the cheapest and most effective solution. 
     
    Using a UPS might help, but indeed you'd need an online UPS, which is probably a bit expensive.
     
    Otherwise you could try to use an isolation transformer.
     
     
     
     
  6. Like
    akio123008 got a reaction from Muhlis Gursoy in Is it good to expose power bank to cold?   
    Charging in sub-zero temperatures can result in damage, discharging them below 0C however is usually not an issue. They just last less long on a single charge, that's about it.
  7. Informative
    akio123008 reacted to jonnyGURU in Will my Seasonic 500W Core GM work with Stepped Sine or i need Pure Sine Wave UPS ?   
    Right.  I misspoke.  The RMS is the same, but the voltage peaks are higher/longer and can exceed the bus voltage of old/cheap PSUs.
     
    I used to install PCs as voice mail servers (the voice mail, call routing, etc. was done in a program that ran in Windows).  The PCs used were standard desktop PCs with ATX PSUs.  Every server was installed with a CyberPower 1500VA UPS which is simulated sine wave.  The only time I ever had an issue was one time I used a PSU brand that came with a case I was using.  The PSU shut down when the UPS switched to battery power.  Otherwise, the few hundred systems I installed over the years never shut down when on battery power.
     
    This included about 20+ systems installed in Florida (lightning capital of the world) and never had a system shut down during a power outage.
     
  8. Like
    akio123008 got a reaction from FaelanMaelan in Will my Seasonic 500W Core GM work with Stepped Sine or i need Pure Sine Wave UPS ?   
    No, that's the wrong way round actually; just because a UPS makes sense for you, it doesn't mean it also does for other people.
     
    You make it seem like I'm against buying a UPS, or something like that, because I don't use one myself, which just isn't true. I only pointed out that most people don't need one, and that therefore suggested the OP considers if they really need a UPS.
     
    The RMS voltage is the same, but the voltage is quite a bit higher than with a regular sine wave at certain points in time. 
     
    I don't know how exactly that affects computer power supplies, but I do know that it can cause some weird effects on other electronics. It's also not recommended to run motors/transformers on square waves due to increased heat production and therefore worse effciency (but probably no damage to anything)
     
     
     
     
     
     
  9. Like
    akio123008 got a reaction from FaelanMaelan in Will my Seasonic 500W Core GM work with Stepped Sine or i need Pure Sine Wave UPS ?   
    I never said "you shouldn't buy a UPS", I said for most people it's a complete waste of money, which is perfectly valid, for the following reasons:
     
    99% of people in general, and I'd say 80%+ people on this forum don't operate mission critical computers.
    For the vast majority of people out there, an outage of one of their machines, however annoying it may be, simply has no serious consequences. The cost of the UPS isn't justified. 
     
    Power surges are very rare, I have personally never experienced one, neither do I know anyone who has. I guess it may depend on where you live. 
     
    Even if you do want to protect yourself from power surges, there are far cheaper surge protection devices you can buy. There's noo need to buy one that also has a complete battery and inverter strapped to it.
     
    You're not wrong about UPS's and how they are useful, I'm just saying that I think some people decide too quickly they want a UPS when really it's overkill for their use case.
  10. Like
    akio123008 got a reaction from FaelanMaelan in Will my Seasonic 500W Core GM work with Stepped Sine or i need Pure Sine Wave UPS ?   
    Do you even need a UPS?
     
    So many people think they need one but really for most of us it's sort of a waste of money.
  11. Funny
    akio123008 got a reaction from Hakemon in Will my Seasonic 500W Core GM work with Stepped Sine or i need Pure Sine Wave UPS ?   
    Do you even need a UPS?
     
    So many people think they need one but really for most of us it's sort of a waste of money.
  12. Informative
    akio123008 got a reaction from minibois in ESD Wrist strap   
    1) Yes.
     
    2) It depends on how the power strip is wired. Normally, the ground is connected regardless of it being on or off.
     
    In general, it also doesn't matter if the power supply is turned on or off, or even if the computer is running or not. The ground is connected regardless. The only reason people like Linus and other tech YouTubers etc. advise you to have it powered off, is because it's not recommended to work on live electrical appliances, not because the ground won't work.
  13. Like
    akio123008 got a reaction from DannyBoii in ESD Wrist strap   
    1) Yes.
     
    2) It depends on how the power strip is wired. Normally, the ground is connected regardless of it being on or off.
     
    In general, it also doesn't matter if the power supply is turned on or off, or even if the computer is running or not. The ground is connected regardless. The only reason people like Linus and other tech YouTubers etc. advise you to have it powered off, is because it's not recommended to work on live electrical appliances, not because the ground won't work.
  14. Like
    akio123008 got a reaction from Tristerin in How much of a damage can ripping the CPU out of socket do?   
    I've experienced this as well, a long time ago.
     
    If there's no physical damage to the CPU or the socket, there's no reason to replace the CPU.
     
    That either has a different reason, or it's in your head and there's actually no difference.
     
    You better not. The CPU is probably fine.
     
    Edit: if there are pins that don't quite make good contact with the socket (which may be why not all RAM is detected) just take out the CPU and carefully reinstall it. If that doesn't fix it, do it again. Maybe even 2 more times. Just reseating things and making sure it's all properly in place (a couple times) often fixes a lot. 
  15. Funny
    akio123008 reacted to flashiling in Help finding name of music   
    found it by using shazam (phone app)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQw4w9WgXcQ
     
     
  16. Agree
    akio123008 got a reaction from Mark Kaine in framerate   
    This is technically true. 
     
    Then there's the argument that it may help you aim, and here's why I think that's BS;
     
    Let's say you're playing at 144Hz. Therefore the time between frames, or in between the green lines in the image, is 1/144 = 0.0069s, or 6.9ms.
     
    This means that if you have the high fps scenario the frame your viewing may be oh idk, 1ms. In the worse scenario (middle one in the image) the worst case age of the frame may be 5ms or so. 
     
    Ok so far so good, so with the "low fps" situation, you may every once in a while be looking at a frame that's 5ms old, compared to a max of 1ms for the high fps. That's a saving of 4ms, and not even every frame, just every now and then. Now here's the deal; your network connection's ping time is far, far greater than that. At best it's about 20ms, but more like 50-100ms. Therefore IMO having a very high fps far over the monitor's refresh rate is pretty pointless.
     
     
     
     
  17. Informative
    akio123008 got a reaction from Kopaka in What is the point of a streaming PC?   
    Well another reason one may want a streaming PC, is to create more redundancy, not just processing power. 
     
    If you have a separate PC that handles all the video encoding and possibly mixing etc, crashes and problems on the system running the game won't ruin the stream. It also allows for easy control of the stream, no alt-tabbing or windowed mode nonsense are required.
     
    Having a separate computer handle the stream also allows someone else to control the stream while you focus purely on the gameplay, something more professional streamers might appreciate.
     
  18. Informative
    akio123008 reacted to colonel_mortis in -1 replies?!?!   
    Unfortunately it's not open or available source.
     
    It's also not something that can easily be changed - supporting transactions in a meaningful way would likely involve completely rearchitecting the code, because database accesses are spread out throughout it. A naive solution, like just starting a transaction at the start of the request and committing at the end, would still run into issues where one thing (such as the post creation in the example above) but some side effects still need to be seen, so it would end up being very difficult to retrofit in any practical way.
  19. Agree
    akio123008 reacted to yaboistar in Battery Power   
    gonna be honest, i'd just tear a powerbank down and cram it in there so that you've got a rechargable power source with a properly designed charging circuit and the appropriate safety features. messing about with lithium batteries is generally considered a bad idea
  20. Funny
  21. Like
    akio123008 got a reaction from Wictorian in Do you think would life be more or less precious if it was infinite.   
    You guys seem to have 2 definitions of infinite;
     
    @mahyaruses "you can't die" (as in you're invincible) in which case it's less precious, because well, there's nothing to lose
    @Wictorianuses "you won't die naturally" (as in you can still get killed in say an accident) in which case, you have more to lose because when you get killed you lose the option of infinite life.
     
    So you're both correct depending on what meaning "infinite life" has.
  22. Like
    akio123008 got a reaction from PlayStation 2 in Do you think would life be more or less precious if it was infinite.   
    You guys seem to have 2 definitions of infinite;
     
    @mahyaruses "you can't die" (as in you're invincible) in which case it's less precious, because well, there's nothing to lose
    @Wictorianuses "you won't die naturally" (as in you can still get killed in say an accident) in which case, you have more to lose because when you get killed you lose the option of infinite life.
     
    So you're both correct depending on what meaning "infinite life" has.
  23. Like
    akio123008 reacted to Lurick in Can't Reach The Speed That My Router Shows   
    Iperf shows the results ignoring any ethernet + TCP/IP overhead which are part of the packet but the more headers = lower amounts of data transmission at a given packet size per packet but is still line rate in terms of actual data (1s and 0s) passed from A to B through a switch. If you want to see real line rate results you're grabbing a proper traffic generator that uses FPGAs and blasting traffic properly not relying on generated packets with iperf which can struggle at higher data rates.
     
    https://sourceforge.net/p/iperf/mailman/message/19147882/
    Headers + 1500 byte packets = 10Gbit/s
    python@ubuntu-py:~$ iperf3 -c 172.31.7.68 -M 1500 -R Connecting to host 172.31.7.68, port 5201 Reverse mode, remote host 172.31.7.68 is sending [ 4] local 172.31.7.67 port 36276 connected to 172.31.7.68 port 5201 [ ID] Interval Transfer Bandwidth [ 4] 0.00-1.00 sec 1.09 GBytes 9.34 Gbits/sec [ 4] 1.00-2.00 sec 1.09 GBytes 9.35 Gbits/sec [ 4] 2.00-3.00 sec 1.09 GBytes 9.35 Gbits/sec [ 4] 3.00-4.00 sec 1.09 GBytes 9.35 Gbits/sec [ 4] 4.00-5.00 sec 1.09 GBytes 9.35 Gbits/sec [ 4] 5.00-6.00 sec 1.09 GBytes 9.35 Gbits/sec [ 4] 6.00-7.00 sec 1.09 GBytes 9.35 Gbits/sec [ 4] 7.00-8.00 sec 1.09 GBytes 9.34 Gbits/sec [ 4] 8.00-9.00 sec 1.09 GBytes 9.35 Gbits/sec [ 4] 9.00-10.00 sec 1.09 GBytes 9.35 Gbits/sec - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - [ ID] Interval Transfer Bandwidth Retr [ 4] 0.00-10.00 sec 10.9 GBytes 9.35 Gbits/sec 0 sender [ 4] 0.00-10.00 sec 10.9 GBytes 9.35 Gbits/sec receiver iperf Done.
  24. Like
    akio123008 got a reaction from ProjectBox153 in Thinking about repairing a dead PSU   
    Haha it appears that people are concerned about your safety. 
     
    Well you have been warned I guess. Personally I don't think working on a power supply is particularly dangerous, or at least not as dangerous as some people suggest. It sure isn't safe, but then neither is repairing any other mains electrical appliance.
     
    If the thing is unplugged there's really not much that can go wrong. Those input capacitors will likely be empty after a few minutes. (surprise surprise there are bleed resistors in power supplies)
     
    The actual hazard IMO isn't in working on the device, but in deploying it again after the fix. If you repair is dodgy, there is a certain fire hazard. That is where the real safety concern is. Therefore I wouldn't recommend operating the device unsupervised if you manage to get it working again.
     
    Now then, what could be wrong with this power supply?
     
    Given it doesn't show any activity at all, it's possible the power supply never even gets the power on signal as suggested by @Windows7geearlier in this thread. It's very hard to tell, it could be lots of things. Best bet is indeed to open it up for visual inspection, you may be able to see the problem.
     
    I suspect it's very hard or even impossible to find a schematic for it, so you'll have to sort of build up one as you go along by probing with the multimeter (just checking what's connected to what and writing it down). It's a long and painstaking process, but you may just be able to diagnose it.
     
    The hardest part of it is finding out what's wrong, the easy part is then fixing it.
  25. Agree
    akio123008 reacted to Windows7ge in Thinking about repairing a dead PSU   
    This would be a general run down of how I might go about troubleshooting a PSU.
    Start with a visual inspection. Any shit-stains? Good place to start. Give it a sniff test. If something smells burnt look for blown caps, cracked transistors, or anything like looks like it let out the magic smoke. Grab a multi-meter and test for a short to ground on the output rails. This would trip over-current protection instantly. If it yields nothing check for a short on the input side. If none of these show results then you might have to start probing the board with Power connected and see where it gets lost. Many PSUs operate off a relay that gets tripped when PS_ON is shorted to ground. The circuit responsible for this could be bad or the relay may have failed. It's also possible over-current protection is somehow stuck on and isn't resetting. If none of these show results you might have to desolder the input caps and start checking that they all register the correct uF. Past that I'm not sure where to go. I'd probably solder a wire across the relay terminals and just see what blows up. 🤣 Be like "Yep, there's your problem!".
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