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cc143

Member
  • Content Count

    1,437
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About cc143

  • Title
    Veteran
  • Birthday Oct 08, 1993

Profile Information

  • Location
    Glasgow, UK
  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Cars, Sailing, Hiking, Scouting, Photography
  • Biography
    3rd year Economics at the University of Glasgow
  • Occupation
    Student

System

  • CPU
    i7 6700k @ 4.5GHZ
  • Motherboard
    ASUS Z170 Deluxe
  • RAM
    2x8gb Teamgroup 2400mhz DDR$
  • GPU
    ASUS GTX 970 STRIX
  • Case
    NZXT H440
  • Storage
    OCZ Agility 240GB SSD + 2TB Seagate HDD
  • PSU
    CM Realpower M1000
  • Display(s)
    2x Samsung Syncmaster 2494HM
  • Cooling
    CM hyper 212 evo
  • Keyboard
    Logitech G710+
  • Mouse
    Logitech MX Performance
  • Operating System
    Win 10/ Ubuntu

Recent Profile Visitors

2,863 profile views
  1. I stand corrected, I'm stil not sure about this though. The cost seems similar but sacrifing upgradeability (as much as possible there ofc) and some significant chunk of performance. I will take the dual channel advice though. I'm aware of the risks of using such psus. But, the power draw is well below cap and its an 80+ bronze unit. I have a 1000W Coolermaster I bought a while back that was in my previous build, but its not currently in the country and if that were not an issue, this would be much less difficult (I could easily salvage gpu, psu ssd from that system and end up paying
  2. CPU is not available in the UK https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/products/cpu/#sort=price&page=1 Mobo allows for future upgrade to r7 How much difference is the dual channel here? I was thinking of adding another stick in 3-4 months. Is it still worth it to go for dual sticks now?
  3. Budget (including currency): GBP - As low as possible hopefully under 650 Country: UK Games, programs or workloads that it will be used for: AAdobe photoshop/lightroom Other details (existing parts lists, whether any peripherals are needed, what you're upgrading from, when you're going to buy, what resolution and refresh rate you want to play at, etc): PCPartPicker Part List Type Item Price CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor £165.00 @ Amazon UK
  4. The 6dII is criticised for being crappy in low light. I haven't seen examples my self, but the 80d is a pretty new sensor and processor, so unless you for a Sony a7s or something I'm not sure if you can get something at a reasonable price in the Canon lineup. The 1dx2 is obviously great in low light, but 5K at least is not worth it. I'd expect the 5d4 would be an improvement, and a used one would probably be comparable in price to the 6d2, or you could always go for an EOS R...
  5. I wouldn't buy a Sony FF either, in fact holding one in my hands, I decided to go for a 4 year old used 5d3 instead. Maybe if Canon or Nikon get their act together, but still, I'm very happy with my dslr, I'd much rather just buy used 5d4s till I can't anymore, will save me money overall in the long run as well, dslr lenses are way too much cheaper now.
  6. My previous reply seems to have fallen on deaf ears, so let me reiterate, I have been into photography for the past 15 years, I have owned an a6000, a number of Canon dslrs and currently maintain a full Canon system with a secondary fuji xt2 system, after buying into it with the xt10 a couple of years ago, which would definitely be the only mirrorless system currently available I would ever buy, despite what the specs may suggest. The m50 is a great little camera, don't get me wrong, but, the value proposition offered by an entry level dslr, especially the 800d, which punches way a
  7. I remember the sony sending pictures to a phone through an app, but Sony has stopped servicing them as far as a I recall. For a beginner I'd recommend neither, for 95% of people looking for their first camera, the answer is either don't buy one or get a used Canon 800d with the 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6IS off ebay.
  8. Just use your phone. Even if you got something in the used market the only advantage would be interchangeable lenses due to how well phone cameras handle now in comparison with what's available from about 10 years ago. Also, shooting on your phone is easy, using a proper camera takes much more knowledge. Not enough you can't learn in the mean time, but just enough for it to make the cost benefit tilt towards the phone.
  9. Buy some 3rd party batteries and a charger that fits 2 of them. I only owned the thing briefly, but I remember the battery life was completely awful.
  10. A 50mm prime lens should give you better results for portraiture. A 35mm is a bit too wide and will result in distortion of the face's proportions etc. (Nose will appear bigger, face fatter etc. ) depending on where you are standing in relation to the subject. The best thing would probably be an 85mm, but at that point you might run into issues with getting the required framing given the effect of the camera's crop factor on the FOV. Be advised, while older D series lenses are great and will be much cheaper, you will have no AF functionality on your d3400 due to its lack of an in
  11. Those look like manual lenses so they would have no AF or electronic aperture control to lose. However there is another element to it, that is flange distance. You can adapt nikon glass to Canon bodies because the distance between the sensor and the lens is shorter for Canon than Nikon. You could fix the lens in front of the camera but the focus would be all wrong if at all useable. With mirrorless cameras that is possible because the lack of a mirror means they have much less distance between the sensor and lens rear element. I am not sure about this whatsoever, but if I were to
  12. I for the life of me can't figure why you'd go for the rx10 over the xt3!
  13. Yes I am Greek, I forgot my flickr was linked and was wondering how you realised, I was even reviewing what I wrote to determine if something gave me away, and Greeks do have quite big communities around the world that is true. Back to the subject at hand, a DSLR will certainly provide better value, and an m100 is not something I would consider really, very outdated hardware and very dinky as a camera, not at all nice to shoot with. The issue is that a DSLR is considerably larger than an m100.
  14. The short answer is yes, optics on mobile phones are quite limited, and so are the capabilities of the sensors which are quite smaller than most dedicated cameras. So in the hands of someone who knows what they are doing, even a 10 year old camera can get better results than most modern phones. But, on the other hand, if you don't know what you are doing, it won't. Modern camera phones employ software to get better quality pictures than a normal camera, frankly even a professional camera won't be that much better than a smartphone if at all. If you are willing put in the time and
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