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vanished

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  • Content Count

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Reputation Activity

  1. Agree
    vanished reacted to RollinLower in Full version of the wallpaper in this thumbnail?   
    most of the time it's more efficient for an editor to just go into an existing graphics library and grab a file rather than go online to search for a good image.
     
    since they already have access to shutterstock, it's easier to just grab a quick image from there rather than google search for a nice one.
  2. Like
    vanished got a reaction from IAmAndre in [Guide] What is sleep?   
    This will be a short post as there isn't much to this topic unless you want to get into really technical details, which is why I've avoided doing it all these years, but I decided finally it is probably worth having.  Speaking of those technical details, if you feel like adding them below, go ahead
     
    Sleep
    This is also sometimes called "Standby", "Suspend to RAM" or just "Suspend".  In this state, your computer basically "pauses" all execution, and then cuts or significantly reduces power to most of the hardware (drives, CPU, etc.).  RAM continues to receive power because without it, the data would slowly fade, become corrupt, and be lost.  Because of this, on battery, you will still draw power until the battery eventually dies and power is lost, but power draw is very small so this could take days or even weeks.  Because everything is still stored in RAM, resuming or "waking up" from this state is very quick, taking usually only a few seconds at most, but if power is lost completely while sleeping, it's no different than if power had been lost while running normally - ie, it counts as an improper shutdown.  In sleep mode, the computer is capable of "listening" for things that can wake it up (laptop lid being opened, keyboard press, etc.) but, as mentioned, no execution happens.  You cannot download files or host a shared folder while sleeping for example.
     
    If you are going to be away from your system for long enough that it doesn't make sense to keep it on, but short enough that it doesn't make sense to shut down (say, between 10 minutes and an hour, but this is subjective), sleep is the recommended state to put your system into.
     
    Hibernation
    This is sometimes called "suspend to disk".  In this state, your computer takes everything in RAM and writes it to the hiberfil.sys (in windows) or the swap partition (in Linux), then physically turns off, no different than if you had shut down.  When turning your computer back on, you will go through POST, have access to the BIOS, and (if you dual boot) have access to GRUB or your bootloader of choice.  Once an operating system is selected though, rather than booting normally, it will simply reload everything from that file to RAM, and then continue running as if nothing had happened.  In this way (from the software's perspective) it is the same as sleep, but from the hardware's perspective, it's the same as being shut down.
     
    There are several reasons why you should or should not use hibernation.  If you dual boot and need to switch OSes routinely without stopping what you were in the middle of, it's a fantastic option.  If you still have a HDD as a boot drive (please don't do this), hibernating whenever possible instead of shutting down will likely improve your off-to-ready times considerably.  Not only do you skip the login phase, but booting itself is faster too in my experience.  I theorize this is because loading one large sequential file is faster than many small files, even if the total amount of data is actually larger, but that's just a guess.  If you have an SSD, you're probably better off shutting down and booting normally though.  In my experience it's faster, and it'll put less wear on your drive.  If you need to pause what you're doing for an extended period of time, or through a period where you will likely lose power, hibernation should be used.
     
    As I mentioned earlier, in Windows, the file used for hibernation is not the page file, and so if you don't intend to ever hibernate, you can disable it with the command powercfg.exe /hibernate off.  Doing so may save you several GB on your C drive, as it seems to hold data even when not in use for some reason... perhaps to make sure there's room when needed?  I actually don't know.
     
    Hybrid Sleep
    This is a feature added in Windows Vista that basically combines the two methods mentioned above.  If my understanding is correct it's also available in MacOS under the name "safe sleep".  If you have this enabled, putting your computer to sleep will cause it to write the hiberfil as if you were going into hibernation, but it will then sleep normally.  If you are able to, you can then resume quickly from sleep as if you'd just slept normally, but if power was lost, the hiberfil is there to resume from as if you had just hibernated normally.  Personally I am not a fan since I am capable of choosing the appropriate method to use manually and this combines both the good, and the bad of both, but to each their own.  It's worth noting that this might be enabled by default, so if you've always found going to sleep takes a long time and has a lot of disk activity associated with it (something that in pure sleep will not happen), you might want to check that in Power Options.
     
    Fast Startup
    Unlike everything else in this list, this isn't a method of suspending execution, but it uses some of the same mechanisms so I thought I'd explain it here.  Basically, if you shut down when this is enabled, parts of the system are saved using a technique similar to hibernation, but the "user stuff" is not, so you effectively get a clean boot*, but perhaps a little faster than it would otherwise be doing it in the traditional way.  I have not experimented with this myself enough to know when if ever it should be used, or the various up and down sides, but it's something you should be aware of.
     
    * It will not save what you were doing but it's possible that things which would be fixed by a traditional reboot would not be fixed when doing this, so keep that in mind.
     
     
    As usual, I hope this has been useful, and if you have any corrections you'd like to suggest please let me know below!
  3. Agree
    vanished got a reaction from Arika S in A Microsoft Defender update can allow an attacker to download malware to a victim PC   
    Either I'm missing something big here or this has been blown totally out of proportion.  If an attacker is able to run commands on your PC like this to make your PC download something they want you do have, you're already infected/compromised, so that feels like a catch 22.  Moreover, the ability to download a file with the command line doesn't seem unusual to me... have they not heard of wget?
  4. Agree
    vanished reacted to leadeater in A Microsoft Defender update can allow an attacker to download malware to a victim PC   
    Well like, you can download files using your browser, cmd, PowerShell etc etc so I'm not really seeing a security risk here? Not sure on the purpose of the DownloadFile switch on the program but I doubt it's used for any definition updates or the AV engine, that's already covered a different way. Wouldn't be surprised if the purpose is to be used for downloading files so that Defender scans them and rates them on the spot. Sadly the documentation doesn't currently have DownloadFile in there so we don't have the description of what Microsoft intends for that switch.
    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/security/threat-protection/microsoft-defender-antivirus/command-line-arguments-microsoft-defender-antivirus
     
    Either way this seems a little bit blown out of proportion, it's not adding any risk and multiple other programs and system tools allow you to do the exact same thing. Here's a good idea, don't download viruses, don't run random scripts, if something asks for administrative permissions that you did not expect close the dialogue (don't even click no unless you have to).
     
    The reason there is no CVE, and likely never will be is because it's not a vulnerability, people doing dumb things with given tools don't get given CVE's.
  5. Like
    vanished got a reaction from Quinnell in YouTube Ads getting seriously aggressive   
    That video is 10:55 on floatplane and 11:31 on YouTube, meaning there's 36 seconds of ads baked in already.  If we add the 4x 5 seconds of YouTube ads on top of that, it comes to 56 seconds on 11:51 of video content, or in other words ~7.9% ads.  Cable TV last I checked was around 33% (an hour would have about 40 mins of show and 20 mins of ads), and don't forget that on top of that you pay for the privilege of watching.  That's also to say nothing of the fact you can watch this on demand and skip those 36 seconds baked in with very little effort, where as to do that with cable TV you'd have to have recorded the program ahead of time and own a PVR to have that option.  I know this is a slight tangent, and I also don't want this to be taken as downplaying the issue, but I want to remind people how horrible cable TV actually is in case they've forgotten
  6. Informative
    vanished reacted to WereCat in Whenever i launch overwatch it makes all of my monitors change color slightly   
    Long time ago when I was playing OW on my 1060 I had an issue where the game would randomly and suddenly go into a yellow or a purple tint mode. 
     
    I found out that it is very sensitive to VRAM OC on my graphics card, no other game would have an issue but OW would always screw my colours because of the OC. It wasn't doing that if I removed the OC from the VRAM. 
  7. Like
    vanished got a reaction from NinJake in Mixer replacement   
    Nice, glad to hear it
  8. Agree
    vanished got a reaction from sub68 in Spotify links do not embed   
    Just noticed this with myself and another user.  When pasting in a link, rather than converting to an embed, I get this banner at the bottom of the editor:

  9. Like
    vanished got a reaction from Rune in [USA/CAN] 9900KF $169 || 9700KF $129   
    Now if they'd just make this the normal price for everyone AMD would be back in some seriously hot water
  10. Like
    vanished reacted to Anka in Mixer replacement   
    I ended up buying the Scarlett 8i6. I have just set it up and it works very well.
    The audio quality is also a lot better now when I can avoid routing it through my monitors HDMI-port.
  11. Informative
    vanished got a reaction from RageTester in Windows XP emulator with working networking on ARM CPU, is there any?   
    The rule of thumb I often hear quoted is that emulation requires the underlying hardware to be 10 to 100x more powerful than the system it's emulating.  Of course this is a broad generalization but it is true that there is quite a significant loss of efficiency.  Couple that with the fact that the Raspberry Pi CPU is, although a quad core, probably somewhat similar in raw performance to what a lot of machines would have actually ran on back in XP's hay day, and I don't think it would be capable of providing a good experience even if such an emulator did exist.
  12. Like
    vanished got a reaction from starry in Prompt user to load edited comments, just like reply   
    I guess I should clarify, I don't mean an old-school sledgehammer full page reload like hitting the browser button, I mean like how it dynamically adds new replies with you click "show reply", just instead of showing new ones, it would update the existing ones (but as I said, with the added convenience of it just happening rather than prompting you with a link at all).
  13. Like
    vanished reacted to Moonzy in Prompt user to load edited comments, just like reply   
    this but for edited comments
     
    "1 reply has been edited Show Edited Reply"
     
    because I'm dumb and always needs to edit my posts
    and people im replying to might see the wrong info and that's not good
    and posting more than one post is sorta spammy
  14. Like
    vanished got a reaction from M.R_KING in external hdd   
    They can also be 5900 RPM.  Traditionally this was never a speed that you'd see but over the last many years it has become common
  15. Informative
    vanished got a reaction from sub68 in [Guide] What is sleep?   
    This will be a short post as there isn't much to this topic unless you want to get into really technical details, which is why I've avoided doing it all these years, but I decided finally it is probably worth having.  Speaking of those technical details, if you feel like adding them below, go ahead
     
    Sleep
    This is also sometimes called "Standby", "Suspend to RAM" or just "Suspend".  In this state, your computer basically "pauses" all execution, and then cuts or significantly reduces power to most of the hardware (drives, CPU, etc.).  RAM continues to receive power because without it, the data would slowly fade, become corrupt, and be lost.  Because of this, on battery, you will still draw power until the battery eventually dies and power is lost, but power draw is very small so this could take days or even weeks.  Because everything is still stored in RAM, resuming or "waking up" from this state is very quick, taking usually only a few seconds at most, but if power is lost completely while sleeping, it's no different than if power had been lost while running normally - ie, it counts as an improper shutdown.  In sleep mode, the computer is capable of "listening" for things that can wake it up (laptop lid being opened, keyboard press, etc.) but, as mentioned, no execution happens.  You cannot download files or host a shared folder while sleeping for example.
     
    If you are going to be away from your system for long enough that it doesn't make sense to keep it on, but short enough that it doesn't make sense to shut down (say, between 10 minutes and an hour, but this is subjective), sleep is the recommended state to put your system into.
     
    Hibernation
    This is sometimes called "suspend to disk".  In this state, your computer takes everything in RAM and writes it to the hiberfil.sys (in windows) or the swap partition (in Linux), then physically turns off, no different than if you had shut down.  When turning your computer back on, you will go through POST, have access to the BIOS, and (if you dual boot) have access to GRUB or your bootloader of choice.  Once an operating system is selected though, rather than booting normally, it will simply reload everything from that file to RAM, and then continue running as if nothing had happened.  In this way (from the software's perspective) it is the same as sleep, but from the hardware's perspective, it's the same as being shut down.
     
    There are several reasons why you should or should not use hibernation.  If you dual boot and need to switch OSes routinely without stopping what you were in the middle of, it's a fantastic option.  If you still have a HDD as a boot drive (please don't do this), hibernating whenever possible instead of shutting down will likely improve your off-to-ready times considerably.  Not only do you skip the login phase, but booting itself is faster too in my experience.  I theorize this is because loading one large sequential file is faster than many small files, even if the total amount of data is actually larger, but that's just a guess.  If you have an SSD, you're probably better off shutting down and booting normally though.  In my experience it's faster, and it'll put less wear on your drive.  If you need to pause what you're doing for an extended period of time, or through a period where you will likely lose power, hibernation should be used.
     
    As I mentioned earlier, in Windows, the file used for hibernation is not the page file, and so if you don't intend to ever hibernate, you can disable it with the command powercfg.exe /hibernate off.  Doing so may save you several GB on your C drive, as it seems to hold data even when not in use for some reason... perhaps to make sure there's room when needed?  I actually don't know.
     
    Hybrid Sleep
    This is a feature added in Windows Vista that basically combines the two methods mentioned above.  If my understanding is correct it's also available in MacOS under the name "safe sleep".  If you have this enabled, putting your computer to sleep will cause it to write the hiberfil as if you were going into hibernation, but it will then sleep normally.  If you are able to, you can then resume quickly from sleep as if you'd just slept normally, but if power was lost, the hiberfil is there to resume from as if you had just hibernated normally.  Personally I am not a fan since I am capable of choosing the appropriate method to use manually and this combines both the good, and the bad of both, but to each their own.  It's worth noting that this might be enabled by default, so if you've always found going to sleep takes a long time and has a lot of disk activity associated with it (something that in pure sleep will not happen), you might want to check that in Power Options.
     
    Fast Startup
    Unlike everything else in this list, this isn't a method of suspending execution, but it uses some of the same mechanisms so I thought I'd explain it here.  Basically, if you shut down when this is enabled, parts of the system are saved using a technique similar to hibernation, but the "user stuff" is not, so you effectively get a clean boot*, but perhaps a little faster than it would otherwise be doing it in the traditional way.  I have not experimented with this myself enough to know when if ever it should be used, or the various up and down sides, but it's something you should be aware of.
     
    * It will not save what you were doing but it's possible that things which would be fixed by a traditional reboot would not be fixed when doing this, so keep that in mind.
     
     
    As usual, I hope this has been useful, and if you have any corrections you'd like to suggest please let me know below!
  16. Informative
    vanished got a reaction from j.son19 in [Guide] What is sleep?   
    It is usually enabled by default, but not always.  In case it isn't for you, you can run the command I mentioned in the guide (except with "on" instead of "off") to enable it.  I believe you may have to reboot after this for it to take effect.  If this still does not work, open Power Options and "Choose what the power buttons do", then use the admin link to unlock the screen and enable it in the list below.
  17. Funny
    vanished got a reaction from soldier_ph in Show Yourself [Image]   
    I thought this was the rate the photograph thread for a second and got ready to complain about it being cropped through the fingers  
     
    nvm me... 
  18. Informative
    vanished got a reaction from soldier_ph in Show Yourself [Image]   
    I've merged this thread. There was no reason to start another one
  19. Agree
    vanished got a reaction from Haro in Mixing different frequency DIMMs.   
    Sometimes mixing different memory can cause issues, but assuming these work together (which they probably will), they will run at the same speed.  By default, this will be the speed of the current (slower) stick, but depending on how well it handles being overclocked, you could bump that up.  I doubt you'll be able to get them both to run at the speed of the faster one though.  If you can't, you'll have to decide if you are ok taking the speed hit and not using the new one to its full potential, or whether it's worth replacing the slower one as well so you can have faster memory.
  20. Agree
    vanished reacted to Arika S in Can't reset Win 10, "no changes were made"   
    back up what ever data you need to keep to another drive and just reinstall from scratch. something got messed up on the recovery partition.
  21. Agree
    vanished got a reaction from 3 Lions in Factory reset windos 7 laptop   
    Yes.  If/when it asks for a key, just use the Win 7 key you already have.  It should accept it and perform the free upgrade seamlessly in the background.
  22. Informative
    vanished got a reaction from Ben17 in Ryzen 5 3600 running hot   
    In my experience, they tend to run hotter and slower than they can get away with if tuned manually.  I have a little write-up about a recent experience here:
    https://linustechtips.com/main/profile/265114-ryan_vickers/?status=257368&type=status
  23. Agree
    vanished got a reaction from Ben17 in Ryzen 5 3600 running hot   
    You want them as low as possible but 80 °C shouldn't be a problem, especially for only brief moments.  Some people are probably running their systems above that for hours at a time.
  24. Agree
    vanished got a reaction from seee the state im in nooow in why so many scared of bottleneck?   
    I think it's only natural to want to get the most out of your system and be sure you're not wasting its potential, so the obsession probably comes from that combined with a lack of understanding.  To the uninitiated, I can imagine bottlenecks are viewed as very exact things that can be measured down to the single percent and components must be chosen precisely to maintain this balance.  In reality of course, it's far more flexible than this, due (among other reasons) to the fact every game has different demands, and even one game can vary in its requirements from frame to frame, so getting things only very roughly in the right class as each other is all that's necessary.
  25. Agree
    vanished got a reaction from HelpfulTechWizard in why so many scared of bottleneck?   
    I think it's only natural to want to get the most out of your system and be sure you're not wasting its potential, so the obsession probably comes from that combined with a lack of understanding.  To the uninitiated, I can imagine bottlenecks are viewed as very exact things that can be measured down to the single percent and components must be chosen precisely to maintain this balance.  In reality of course, it's far more flexible than this, due (among other reasons) to the fact every game has different demands, and even one game can vary in its requirements from frame to frame, so getting things only very roughly in the right class as each other is all that's necessary.
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