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Mikensan

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  1. Agree
    Mikensan reacted to dalekphalm in Backplane Configurations   
    Can you clarify what your actual question is? Any SAS HBA will work with this. If it's a straight backplane (no built-in expander) then you'll need to get an HBA with four mini-SAS connectors to fully connect all 24 drives. Or alternatively, two separate HBA's w/ 2 mini-SAS connectors each (these are more common and cheaper).
     
    From reading through the user manual, it does appear to have a built-in expander.
    https://www.supermicro.com/manuals/other/BPN-SAS2-846EL.pdf
    Page 17
     
    Assuming you have the EL1 version (not the EL2), you cannot run a dual connection to the expander, as that's an exclusive feature of the EL2 version.
  2. Like
    Mikensan reacted to willocrisp5000 in Home server questions   
    Watch the recent video were they constantly crash the server running minecraft. You're gonna wanna VM. Or docker. I would start in the FreeNAS forum.
  3. Like
    Mikensan got a reaction from Ben17 in LTT Official Discord!   
    Beyond mainstream acceptance, what does Discord offer over mIRC? Just voice? With thousands of people is voice really relevant?
  4. Like
    Mikensan got a reaction from Ecto in Help! Storage workflow Nightmare, Cloud backup   
    Do you have a model for this LACIE? I've only heard of their external drives, did not know they offer NAS solutions.
  5. Like
    Mikensan got a reaction from Ecto in Help! Storage workflow Nightmare, Cloud backup   
    Ah I see, since you already have the QNAP then you might as well use it. It appears to have thunderbolt support so it ~should~ be plug and play. Those NASs typically run Linux which should should handle NTFS / EXT just fine assuming your LACIE is in one of those formats.
     
    If you didn't have the QNAP I would just advise to use the ingest station as a NAS.
     
     
  6. Informative
    Mikensan got a reaction from KingCollins in Safe to expose a Apache Webserver endpoint?   
    SSL protects the data in transit, not the server itself. 
    Large portion of websites are hosted on apache, so I would read some hardening guides, separate it from the rest of your network, and go for it. There are probably a few scripts you can run that will walk through and secure apache.
     
    If you use Nextcloud (fork of owncloud, better IMO) they have a hardened OVA you can import into ESXi. I believe their docker varient is also secured.
     
    If your reverse proxy isn't secure but your apache server is, it almost defeats the purpose. Reverse proxies work great, just make sure you keep it + the apache server up to date.
  7. Like
    Mikensan got a reaction from niculw in Looking for Horizon 7 alternative (VM VDI server)   
    You could do what linus did, and buy a thundbolt docking station and run it to the server over fiber. Then using microsoft multipoint server or whatever hypervisor you want, assign those IO devices to specific VMs.
     
    RDP actually works quite well, are you having any specific issues with it?
     
    Also if this is for a lab, you always have the option of VMUG to get a full license for Horizon.
  8. Agree
    Mikensan reacted to Slayerking92 in FreeNAS is killing me   
    Are you trying to install freenas to a USB drive?  I know you can do that on another system and still boot it from the server.
  9. Agree
    Mikensan reacted to NelizMastr in Looking for Horizon 7 alternative (VM VDI server)   
    ^ This.
     
    If graphics are really required, one of the niche use cases for VDI, there's also RemoteFX available. The main benefit to PCoIP is that it's picture perfect, and HDX and RemoteFX are not.
  10. Agree
    Mikensan reacted to dalekphalm in Personal File Server Rebuild Thoughts   
    Agreed - though to explain why some people say it's not a good solution:
     
    Most drives are rated with a specific MBF number (Mean time between failures), and larger HDD's are so large and take so long to rebuild an array, that statistically, you have a much higher chance of a second drive having some sort of failure during the rebuild than with older smaller drives.
     
    How likely is that to be a real issue? None if you keep proper backups, and even so, odds are you likely won't have any issues still.
     
    Personally I run a RAIDZ1 array, which is basically the same as RAID5 - with the added benefit of ZFS scrubbing the array periodically looking for errors or degraded SMART stats preemptively.
     
    For home use, as long as important data is backed up, RAID5 is fine.
  11. Agree
    Mikensan got a reaction from leadeater in Looking for Horizon 7 alternative (VM VDI server)   
    You could do what linus did, and buy a thundbolt docking station and run it to the server over fiber. Then using microsoft multipoint server or whatever hypervisor you want, assign those IO devices to specific VMs.
     
    RDP actually works quite well, are you having any specific issues with it?
     
    Also if this is for a lab, you always have the option of VMUG to get a full license for Horizon.
  12. Agree
    Mikensan got a reaction from dalekphalm in Safe to expose a Apache Webserver endpoint?   
    SSL protects the data in transit, not the server itself. 
    Large portion of websites are hosted on apache, so I would read some hardening guides, separate it from the rest of your network, and go for it. There are probably a few scripts you can run that will walk through and secure apache.
     
    If you use Nextcloud (fork of owncloud, better IMO) they have a hardened OVA you can import into ESXi. I believe their docker varient is also secured.
     
    If your reverse proxy isn't secure but your apache server is, it almost defeats the purpose. Reverse proxies work great, just make sure you keep it + the apache server up to date.
  13. Agree
    Mikensan got a reaction from dalekphalm in LMG Server Software   
    I never got a clear understanding whether or not they run hypervisors at LMG. I think their only needs are storage (file shares) and rendering - so not much else.
     
    They've shifted from one storage solution to another, though I'm not aware they ever used FreeNAS. Just GlusterFS for a short skinny and then unraid. Last I heard, they are overall just running unraid. He quickly moved away from GlusterFS once he had a node go down and required phone support to recover his data.
     
    GlusterFS is a solution to spread out your storage for both redundancy and availability. You can slide the scale via configuration for which is more important. Any speed benefit is merely a side-effect and not the main objective (aside from storage being locally redundant). Think of it similar to a CDN.
     
    FreeNAS is a general all purpose storage solution with a GUI backed by ZFS. A lot of storage solutions are offering ZFS because of the data integrity it offers. FreeNAS is well received because it's easy to use, offers many protocols, and has been proven as rock-solid.
     
    unRaid is a general all purpose storage solution with a GUI with a focus on virtual machines. Their raid solution is built for fault tolerance while minimizing data loss at the cost of speed. It round-robins files between the disks, instead of writing a single file across many disks. Write speeds can be inflated when you're writing multiple files and the raid has multiple disks. Write speed can also be improved with a SSD buffer.
     
    HyperV is a great solution if you just need VMs and not much ealse - free and point and click. Personally not a fan though.
    ESXi is a great solution for a little more fine-tuning (especially networking) that can be done through the GUI. It also scales out very easily and quickly.
    Proxmox is a mixture of the two in my opinion, lot of features but maybe you have to drop down to command line once in a while for certain things.
     
    There is no cookie cutter answer for what solution works best for each field of work. Each business is unique in how they want to protect their data, meet customer needs, and lean on technology for certain capabilities. So in the end what you have is a box of legos in which you simply need to know which each piece does, and assemble your own castle.
  14. Like
    Mikensan got a reaction from leadeater in LMG Server Software   
    oh I think I'm losing it, maybe it was the whonnock server I'm thinking of - I could've sword they had another server die that was running gluster and it was too hard for them to figure out (or maybe it was just the initial configuration)... 
  15. Like
    Mikensan got a reaction from leadeater in LMG Server Software   
    I never got a clear understanding whether or not they run hypervisors at LMG. I think their only needs are storage (file shares) and rendering - so not much else.
     
    They've shifted from one storage solution to another, though I'm not aware they ever used FreeNAS. Just GlusterFS for a short skinny and then unraid. Last I heard, they are overall just running unraid. He quickly moved away from GlusterFS once he had a node go down and required phone support to recover his data.
     
    GlusterFS is a solution to spread out your storage for both redundancy and availability. You can slide the scale via configuration for which is more important. Any speed benefit is merely a side-effect and not the main objective (aside from storage being locally redundant). Think of it similar to a CDN.
     
    FreeNAS is a general all purpose storage solution with a GUI backed by ZFS. A lot of storage solutions are offering ZFS because of the data integrity it offers. FreeNAS is well received because it's easy to use, offers many protocols, and has been proven as rock-solid.
     
    unRaid is a general all purpose storage solution with a GUI with a focus on virtual machines. Their raid solution is built for fault tolerance while minimizing data loss at the cost of speed. It round-robins files between the disks, instead of writing a single file across many disks. Write speeds can be inflated when you're writing multiple files and the raid has multiple disks. Write speed can also be improved with a SSD buffer.
     
    HyperV is a great solution if you just need VMs and not much ealse - free and point and click. Personally not a fan though.
    ESXi is a great solution for a little more fine-tuning (especially networking) that can be done through the GUI. It also scales out very easily and quickly.
    Proxmox is a mixture of the two in my opinion, lot of features but maybe you have to drop down to command line once in a while for certain things.
     
    There is no cookie cutter answer for what solution works best for each field of work. Each business is unique in how they want to protect their data, meet customer needs, and lean on technology for certain capabilities. So in the end what you have is a box of legos in which you simply need to know which each piece does, and assemble your own castle.
  16. Agree
    Mikensan reacted to leadeater in LMG Server Software   
    LMG/LTT != enterprise ?
     
    Actually though if you are interesting in working in the IT field LMG is not what you want to use as an education source, use it for entertainment which it's really good for.
     
    Windows Server is used because there is replication software they use that only works on Windows and Window Server does SMB shares better than Linux does, if you want 10Gb or higher throughput per single client and don't want to have to do many performance tweaks on Linux and have higher CPU overhead.
     
    GlusterFS is far cheaper than any Windows option for long term archive, same for Ceph, Swift and FreeNAS/ZFS.
  17. Agree
    Mikensan reacted to dalekphalm in Synology DS918+ & HDDs (Windows / Defrag / Read & Write / Longevity)   
    1. Don't worry about defrags. In terms of partitioning a RAID array itself, I wouldn't bother with "overprovisioning" (the practice if leaving some space unpartitioned).
    2. I wouldn't worry too much about how close you get to full (say, keep it above 5%, but realistically, it won't really make a difference anyway)
    3. Don't fill up your drive completely - this isn't due to performance reasons, but more so due to practical reasons. Plan ahead. If your drive capacity is getting under 10%, time to order a new drive, since you'll likely fill the drive up completely and run out of spare space soon enough anyway.
  18. Agree
    Mikensan reacted to Electronics Wizardy in FreeNAS/Nextcloud Giving Me Grief...   
    If you doing nextcloud and already have a hypervisor, why not just make a seprate vm for nextcloud and not run it in freenas?
     
    This feels like a nginx config issue, can you change those config files?
  19. Like
    Mikensan got a reaction from MrSco in Computer-Less RAID Ingestion Station   
    There's no turnkey solution, but most NASs (synology / qnap / etc) run on linux and have USB ports. I would look at their addons first (should be able to find them "synology addons") and see if there is already something. If there is such an addon, you'd just buy a SD card reader and plug 'er in.
     
    There's probably already a debian based package that will monitor for removable media and pull files off of it, this would require a little more on your part. 
  20. Agree
    Mikensan reacted to leadeater in Synology DS918+ & HDDs (Windows / Defrag / Read & Write / Longevity)   
    Personally I don't worry about defrag (I let it run on schedule but never check it), I've never encountered any meaningful decrease or increase in performance. If you are doing a lot of deletions it may become an issue but rarely would it cause application performance or access issues like video files not playing back or time seeking well.
     
    For larger servers with hundreds of users simultaneously accessing it sequential access patterns actually become random I/O as it has to service these multiple sessions, more users the more random like the I/O will be and the less impact fragmentation has since the disks will be seeking constantly for blocks of data.
  21. Like
    Mikensan reacted to Annihlator in Computer-Less RAID Ingestion Station   
    I know for a fact my DS1815+ can show the contents of plugged-in usb thumbdrives in it's web-interface.

    Testing with the only cardreader I have (USB Sandisk MobileMate USB2.0 which i got with my microsd-card) it does show up as-if i'd plugged in another thumb drive!
    It must be noted for some if not all synology NASes you may need optional "exFAT access" to access exFAT partitions, I know I had to do this also in order to acces exFAT-formatted thumb drives.

    I would guess based on this small test as long as the reader presents itself as any other usb mass storage medium, it just might work
  22. Agree
    Mikensan got a reaction from TopHatProductions115 in Proxmox or ESXI   
    In business environments the two I've seen are HyperV and ESXi. ESXi scales better in my opinion, with a lot more solutions for datacenters. I haven't seen any KVM based solutions personally. That said, Nutanix is gained a lot of popularity (which can use ESXi or their own KVM spinoff).
     
    In terms of gainig useful insight or learning something to benefit your career, I would run ESXi or HyperV.
     
    Also Server 2019 is out - unless you are actually learning / gaining knowledge from the 2012 course, I wouldn't bother. 2016 and 2019 are different enough that the 2012 certificate won't mean much to a 2016+ environment without years of M$ experience.
  23. Agree
    Mikensan reacted to Electronics Wizardy in Proxmox vs Docker for a Home server.   
    you can give the vm all of the host cores for very close to metal performance.
     
    Using a vm give you snapshots, easy backups, live migration and easy swapping between server. And you can run other oses later on if you want too.
  24. Agree
    Mikensan reacted to Electronics Wizardy in Proxmox vs Docker for a Home server.   
    why not run docker on proxmox? Make a vm to run docker on, then you can make other vms later if you need them.
     
    What hardware are you running? what drives? doing root on zfs on promox is super easy.
     
     
  25. Agree
    Mikensan reacted to KarathKasun in Poor Performance to Samba share with Windows Server 2016 Essentials   
    Wired ethernet does not work that way by default.  With minimal QoS, which is pretty universally supported, when both PCs access the network over GbE their speed will be 500mbit.
     
    No guesswork, you connect media, IoT, and other low bandwidth devices like printers, tablets, and phones up to one AP and computers or high bandwidth devices to the other.  Because both AP's share the same wired back end network, all devices behave as if they are on the same network.  Think of multiple dumb APs as having multiple hubs connected to the same network.  All devices on one hub/AP share the same bandwidth pool.
     
    In an ideal world, your in home server connection will not share any common route that leads to the internet.  That way if one device is doing heavy lifting on the server, you dont crap out the other connections.  This would mean that the AP used for the server connection should be on its own port of your primary switch.  OR, you can connect the server directly to the switch integrated with that AP.  In which case you could bang away at the server and no other connection would ever know about it.
     
    I would have to MSPaint some example topologies to really make what I am saying clear I think.
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