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quan289

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  1. Like
    quan289 got a reaction from svmlegacy in 3 Power supplies or 1?   
    In a multi-PSU setup, the supplementary PSU are typically put in a severe crossload scenario (high 12V load and no load on the minor rails), where the voltage regulation can behave erractically. Because of that, you simply don't want to grab multiples of random 500w PSUs. You want to look for a power supply that's independently regulated via dual mag amp or uses DC-DC for the minor rails, which a lot of your budget options starts at the ~$60 price point.
     
    Anyways, you could simply buy a modular supply, whose modular board made the 6+2 pin PEG connector and 4+4 CPU connector interchangeable and buy another set of cables separately.
     
    For example, the Corsair RM850x:
    https://www.bestbuy.com/site/corsair-rmx-series-850w-atx12v-2-4-eps12v-2-92-80-plus-gold-modular-power-supply-black/6229601.p?skuId=6229601
    https://www.corsair.com/us/en/Categories/Products/Accessories-|-Parts/PC-Components/Power-Supplies/Type-4-Sleeved-black-8-pin-(4%2B4)-ATX12V-EPS12V-Cable%2C-compatible-with-all-CORSAIR-type-4-pin-out-PSU/p/CP-8920141
     
    If you look at the modular ports, you can potentially put five PEG connectors, five CPU connectors, or a mixed of both. The RM850x has two already.
  2. Informative
    quan289 got a reaction from Cyberspirit in 3 Power supplies or 1?   
    In a multi-PSU setup, the supplementary PSU are typically put in a severe crossload scenario (high 12V load and no load on the minor rails), where the voltage regulation can behave erractically. Because of that, you simply don't want to grab multiples of random 500w PSUs. You want to look for a power supply that's independently regulated via dual mag amp or uses DC-DC for the minor rails, which a lot of your budget options starts at the ~$60 price point.
     
    Anyways, you could simply buy a modular supply, whose modular board made the 6+2 pin PEG connector and 4+4 CPU connector interchangeable and buy another set of cables separately.
     
    For example, the Corsair RM850x:
    https://www.bestbuy.com/site/corsair-rmx-series-850w-atx12v-2-4-eps12v-2-92-80-plus-gold-modular-power-supply-black/6229601.p?skuId=6229601
    https://www.corsair.com/us/en/Categories/Products/Accessories-|-Parts/PC-Components/Power-Supplies/Type-4-Sleeved-black-8-pin-(4%2B4)-ATX12V-EPS12V-Cable%2C-compatible-with-all-CORSAIR-type-4-pin-out-PSU/p/CP-8920141
     
    If you look at the modular ports, you can potentially put five PEG connectors, five CPU connectors, or a mixed of both. The RM850x has two already.
  3. Informative
    quan289 got a reaction from BetteBalterZen in Overkill PSU for low noise under load   
    That depends on the PSU. Some PSUs can get louder if you were to get a higher wattage unit, because they will generate more heat at full load, requiring a more powerful fan, and thus have a higher startup voltage where the fan will spin up at a higher RPM at low loads. A good example of this is the EVGA Supernova 550 G3 and 850 G3. Interestingly enough, going with a higher wattage unit didn't change when the PSU was in passive mode (fanless) @ 30C but when it spun up, the 550w unit not only stayed ~10dBA quieter, it was quieter at almost its ENTIRE load range than the 850w.
     
    If low noise is a priority, then it would be in your best interest to look for PSUs with a high quality, quiet fan and a relax fan profile in the first place. Also, while getting a higher wattage unit may cause the passive mode threshold to extend to a higher load, be wary of having your load at that threshold where it switches to active mode. Either have it stay off or stay on - not on/off several times in a single gaming session. Having it turn on and off intermittently can be distracting, as well as can causing unnecessary wear on certain bearings and may decrease it lifespan. During the initial startup, a FDB will have the most stress, as it needs to spin up and circulate the oil, where the oil pressure is build up to stabilized the bearing and have it spin freely.
  4. Like
    quan289 got a reaction from Moonzy in Do PSUs need regular replacing? Or only if it stops working?   
    How regularly you will need to replace it depends on the quality of the power supply and its usage. Typically, a power supply should be able to output its rated wattage 24/7 continuously at its rated operating temperature for the span of its warranty. In the case of your Corsair, it should be able to do 850w continuously at 50C ambient temperature for 10 years, and it should do so while staying in ATX specification.
  5. Informative
    quan289 got a reaction from Deli in Do PSUs need regular replacing? Or only if it stops working?   
    How regularly you will need to replace it depends on the quality of the power supply and its usage. Typically, a power supply should be able to output its rated wattage 24/7 continuously at its rated operating temperature for the span of its warranty. In the case of your Corsair, it should be able to do 850w continuously at 50C ambient temperature for 10 years, and it should do so while staying in ATX specification.
  6. Informative
    quan289 got a reaction from nick name in Is CPU 8-Pin The Same As GPU 8-Pin?   
    No, they are not the same. They share a similarity in that they both need ground and +12V wires, so companies will make the connection on the PSU side interchangeable in order to save space on the modular board; however, they will be different at the component end.
     

  7. Agree
    quan289 got a reaction from Moonzy in Is CPU 8-Pin The Same As GPU 8-Pin?   
    No, they are not the same. They share a similarity in that they both need ground and +12V wires, so companies will make the connection on the PSU side interchangeable in order to save space on the modular board; however, they will be different at the component end.
     

  8. Like
    quan289 got a reaction from Spotty in Is CPU 8-Pin The Same As GPU 8-Pin?   
    No, they are not the same. They share a similarity in that they both need ground and +12V wires, so companies will make the connection on the PSU side interchangeable in order to save space on the modular board; however, they will be different at the component end.
     

  9. Agree
    quan289 got a reaction from Fasauceome in Is CPU 8-Pin The Same As GPU 8-Pin?   
    No, they are not the same. They share a similarity in that they both need ground and +12V wires, so companies will make the connection on the PSU side interchangeable in order to save space on the modular board; however, they will be different at the component end.
     

  10. Agree
    quan289 got a reaction from bmx6454 in Is CPU 8-Pin The Same As GPU 8-Pin?   
    No, they are not the same. They share a similarity in that they both need ground and +12V wires, so companies will make the connection on the PSU side interchangeable in order to save space on the modular board; however, they will be different at the component end.
     

  11. Like
    quan289 got a reaction from Cut in GIGABYTE GP-P550B 550WATTS 80 PLUS BRONZE   
    @CutThe Corsair CV550 is an updated version of the VS to Bronze.
    Based on the specs, the Gigabyte not like the PB-650B which uses DC-DC (the CV650 is DC-DC as well), as specs on 12V suggest group regulated like the CV550. So they are both low-end, budget units, which I would get the Corsair CV.
     
    In the $75 price point though, I would recommend the CX550 instead: https://www.newegg.com/corsair-cx-series-cx550-550w/p/N82E16817139202
    Or the 450 version, as that would be more than plenty.
  12. Informative
    quan289 got a reaction from martward in Downside to too much Watt? (RM850x vs TX750M V2 vs RM750)   
    Depending on when you'd purchased your Focus Gold, the issues should have been fix.
     
    Spending more than what you need.
    Efficiency at idle / low power draw may be worse.
    Some people may sacrifice quality for a higher wattage unit (getting an EVGA 600 W1 instead of a Corsair CX450 when they are in the same price point).
    Lack of research can cause someone end up getting a louder PSU (higher wattage unit may require more powerful fan which can have a negative impact on the units overall noise profile; e.g. EVGA Supernova 550 G3 -> 850 G3).
     
    In your case, the first two points I've made is relevant to you.
  13. Agree
    quan289 got a reaction from OledAndy in How often would I need to upgrade my PSU?   
    The PowerSpec 650w Gold unit is a HB LLC + DC-DC design based on the Sirfa / High Power Astro Lite platform. Since you already got it, I say you will be fine to continue using it.
  14. Agree
    quan289 got a reaction from jonnyGURU in new psu worry or is it fine   
    I've made a post about this a few days ago "It's the NTC bypass relay. The NTC thermistor is there to protect the PSU from the initial inrush currents during startup. Afterward, a relay may be used to switch on and bypass the thermistor which allows it to cool down and improved efficiency (mostly this). This click is just the relay engaging and disengaging." Your FD Ion+ Platinum does have this relay.
  15. Like
    quan289 got a reaction from Spotty in Which 150$ power supply is the best here??   
    There are some power supply that allows you to switch between multi-rail and single rail for those who want the convenience of a single rail or the added protection of a multirail. Power supplies like the Corsair AXi / HXi / RMi / HX / etc, BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 10 / 11 / 12, etc.
  16. Like
    quan289 got a reaction from Spotty in Which 150$ power supply is the best here??   
    The voltage rails of a power supply (12V, 5V, 3.3V). In this case, we are talking about the 12V and how it is configured.
    Single Rail : EVGA 1000 G+ has 83.3A on 12V
     
    Multirail :  BeQuiet Straight Power 11 850w has a 12V rating of 70.8A combined that is split up into four 12V circuit. Think of this something similar to a circuit / fuse box inside of your home.
     
  17. Informative
    quan289 got a reaction from fpo in Which 150$ power supply is the best here??   
    The voltage rails of a power supply (12V, 5V, 3.3V). In this case, we are talking about the 12V and how it is configured.
    Single Rail : EVGA 1000 G+ has 83.3A on 12V
     
    Multirail :  BeQuiet Straight Power 11 850w has a 12V rating of 70.8A combined that is split up into four 12V circuit. Think of this something similar to a circuit / fuse box inside of your home.
     
  18. Like
    quan289 got a reaction from Durb in Be Quiet Straight Power 11 makes clicky noise   
    It's the NTC bypass relay. The NTC thermistor is there to protect the PSU from the initial inrush currents during startup. Afterward, a relay may be used to switch on and bypass the thermistor which allows it to cool down and improved efficiency (mostly this). This click is just the relay engaging and disengaging.
     
    To confirm that your PSU has this relay, here's a review on your PSU: https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/be-quiet-straight-power-11-650w-platinum-power-supply-review
    Under the Component Analysis section and next to Inrush Protection: "NTC Thermistor (SCK-056) & Relay"
  19. Agree
    quan289 got a reaction from Moonzy in need another help   
    When you have a power supply that you can essentially takes the three main voltages and add them together to get the rated wattage, it's trash.
    (3.3*15)+(12*25)+(12*25)+(5*20)=749.5w
     
    A properly rated PSU will not have their rails added up in such a way.
  20. Informative
    quan289 got a reaction from help me pls.. in need another help   
    When you have a power supply that you can essentially takes the three main voltages and add them together to get the rated wattage, it's trash.
    (3.3*15)+(12*25)+(12*25)+(5*20)=749.5w
     
    A properly rated PSU will not have their rails added up in such a way.
  21. Informative
    quan289 got a reaction from Senzelian in Is Molex 4 pin to PCIE 6 pin safe?   
    It's a bait and switch. This mean they initially send a PSU that can do full 100-240V input range, but the retail model is a different unit from what they had tested. The MPVU750 is a 200-240V PSU, but it is listed in 115V internal on 2012. Ecova only tested desktop PSUs at 115V back then. It wasn't until 2014 that the 230V EU certification started.
     
     
  22. Agree
    quan289 got a reaction from Ankerson in Is Molex 4 pin to PCIE 6 pin safe?   
    It's a bait and switch. This mean they initially send a PSU that can do full 100-240V input range, but the retail model is a different unit from what they had tested. The MPVU750 is a 200-240V PSU, but it is listed in 115V internal on 2012. Ecova only tested desktop PSUs at 115V back then. It wasn't until 2014 that the 230V EU certification started.
     
     
  23. Informative
    quan289 got a reaction from biobreaker in Is Molex 4 pin to PCIE 6 pin safe?   
    Efficiency rating should not be used as an indication for an unit quality. In fact, a good quality 750w typically have at least four 6/8pin PEG connectors. Hell, when I still had it, my Kingwin LZP-550 had four of them.
     
    6+2 pin PEG can function as both a 6-pin or an 8-pin. However, I recommend getting a different power supply. Tacens has a history of doing the switch and bait, where they take one unit, send it to Ecova to have it tested for 80 Plus certification, got a 80 Plus Silver rating, and then sold a completely different unit made by a different OEM while still using that Silver badge.
  24. Agree
    quan289 got a reaction from Ankerson in Is Molex 4 pin to PCIE 6 pin safe?   
    Efficiency rating should not be used as an indication for an unit quality. In fact, a good quality 750w typically have at least four 6/8pin PEG connectors. Hell, when I still had it, my Kingwin LZP-550 had four of them.
     
    6+2 pin PEG can function as both a 6-pin or an 8-pin. However, I recommend getting a different power supply. Tacens has a history of doing the switch and bait, where they take one unit, send it to Ecova to have it tested for 80 Plus certification, got a 80 Plus Silver rating, and then sold a completely different unit made by a different OEM while still using that Silver badge.
  25. Like
    quan289 got a reaction from Spotty in NEED HELP ABOUT PSU! ASAP   
    If any of you heard of Fortech or Segetop, then know that Colorful is their parent company. Fortech also had made some of Enermax Platimax D.F. lineup: https://www.jonnyguru.com/blog/2017/09/25/enermax-platimax-df-600w-power-supply/
     
    This Colorful PSU does not have a fake 80 plus rating. You can easily verified this by looking it up on the the 80 Plus database on the Plug Load Solutions website.
    https://www.plugloadsolutions.com/80PlusPowerSuppliesDetail.aspx?id=1408&type=2
     
    Despite me never been fond of tier list, those Enermax and Segetop units seem to be listed as Tier B or A on this site's Tier list. I'm not saying to treat this PSU that it is just as good, as there isn't any reviews on it as far as I know (but it seem to be based on a modern LLC + DC-DC design), but can we not go around calling something a bomb just because the name seem unfamiliar or odd. I'm pretty sure "Super Flower" seem like a funny looking name when a lot of people first saw it.
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