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DrMacintosh

Member
  • Content Count

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Reputation Activity

  1. Agree
    DrMacintosh got a reaction from Brooksie359 in One of Bay Area's few Fry's Electronics stores closes (5 Stores remaining)   
    it's unfortunate. Luckily I live near a MicroCenter though soooooo....
     
    Competition is gonna compete. 
  2. Funny
    DrMacintosh got a reaction from williamcll in One of Bay Area's few Fry's Electronics stores closes (5 Stores remaining)   
    it's unfortunate. Luckily I live near a MicroCenter though soooooo....
     
    Competition is gonna compete. 
  3. Like
    DrMacintosh reacted to like_ooh_ahh in Your Computer isn't Yours   
    It is. It's a standard operating procedure for all security solutions to collect information on newly installed applications and how they perform once installed should they exhibit malicious behavior. 👇🏻
     
  4. Like
    DrMacintosh reacted to RejZoR in Your Computer isn't Yours   
    So, just by seeing what it's doing I've established correctly that it's the same thing as Windows Defender and SmartScreen on Windows. Heh, so much drama for nothing. I also remember it was talked about this quite some time ago.
  5. Like
    DrMacintosh reacted to lexusgamer05 in Show off your latest purchase!   
    Picked up some new wireless earbuds today! My first proper decent pair of fully wireless earbuds.
  6. Agree
    DrMacintosh got a reaction from Tenelia in Your Computer isn't Yours   
    You know you can just monitor the data as it leaves your own machine....right? 
  7. Funny
    DrMacintosh got a reaction from kirashi in Your Computer isn't Yours   
    As was described in the article I posted....this "data" that Apple is collecting is completely useless in terms of identifying who you are. Apple checks developer certificates only when an app is installed or updated. Developer Certificates are incredibly generic things, they can't really be used to gather data about you other than "this machine installed/updated an app from this developer." Nothing in the Data apple gets involves a time of access, app name, or any info about what's being done with the app. It's literally just a malware check. 
  8. Informative
    DrMacintosh reacted to like_ooh_ahh in Your Computer isn't Yours   
    There is a documentation. https://manuals.info.apple.com/MANUALS/1000/MA1902/en_US/apple-platform-security-guide.pdf
    Privacy Policy: https://www.apple.com/legal/privacy/en-ww/
    Analytics: https://support.apple.com/lt-lt/guide/mac-help/mh27990/mac
     

     
    The last time I checked, this is how all antivirus applications work from Microsoft Defender to the Kaspersky solutions. The reason why they use this kind of telemetry is because it can innoculate many systems faster should "patient zero" gets infected by a new malware.
  9. Funny
    DrMacintosh got a reaction from kirashi in Your Computer isn't Yours   
    100% 
    There certainly could be a different way to do what's currently being done. Ideally if the server that's performing the checks is down, nobody will notice anything since the Mac will just give up checking. That server being slow, not down, is what caused the issue. 
     
    Opting out of this feature is a pretty bad idea, since as was noted in the link I posted, this is a critical part in how macOS detects malware. 
  10. Informative
    DrMacintosh got a reaction from NotTheFirstDaniel in Your Computer isn't Yours   
    This topic has been debunked:
    https://blog.jacopo.io/en/post/apple-ocsp/
     
    edit: Not necessarily “debunked.” It would be more accurate to say that the claims made by  Jeffery Paul are not accurate in most ways that impact user privacy. 
  11. Agree
    DrMacintosh got a reaction from like_ooh_ahh in Your Computer isn't Yours   
    This topic has been debunked:
    https://blog.jacopo.io/en/post/apple-ocsp/
     
    edit: Not necessarily “debunked.” It would be more accurate to say that the claims made by  Jeffery Paul are not accurate in most ways that impact user privacy. 
  12. Informative
    DrMacintosh got a reaction from kingmustard in Your Computer isn't Yours   
    This topic has been debunked:
    https://blog.jacopo.io/en/post/apple-ocsp/
     
    edit: Not necessarily “debunked.” It would be more accurate to say that the claims made by  Jeffery Paul are not accurate in most ways that impact user privacy. 
  13. Like
    DrMacintosh got a reaction from Bombastinator in Your Computer isn't Yours   
    This topic has been debunked:
    https://blog.jacopo.io/en/post/apple-ocsp/
     
    edit: Not necessarily “debunked.” It would be more accurate to say that the claims made by  Jeffery Paul are not accurate in most ways that impact user privacy. 
  14. Funny
    DrMacintosh got a reaction from kirashi in Your Computer isn't Yours   
    This topic has been debunked:
    https://blog.jacopo.io/en/post/apple-ocsp/
     
    edit: Not necessarily “debunked.” It would be more accurate to say that the claims made by  Jeffery Paul are not accurate in most ways that impact user privacy. 
  15. Funny
    DrMacintosh got a reaction from kirashi in Your Computer isn't Yours   
    You’re right, it would be ridiculous. Thankfully what’s described in the OPs source isn’t accurate. 
     
    This is: https://blog.jacopo.io/en/post/apple-ocsp/
  16. Agree
    DrMacintosh got a reaction from yuh25 in Your Computer isn't Yours   
    A personal blog is not a source btw. 
  17. Like
    DrMacintosh reacted to BuckGup in Is this true about apple products?   
    If you actually read the article they clearly state it could simply be a bug as Big Sur is in beta and has no official release date. For all we know it could be a way for Apple to collect data on the beta channels and use it to fix bugs before release and the functionality is removed upon launch. People are extremely trigger happy with this kind of stuff especially revolving around Apple. I blame Linus a lot and other Youtubers as they have capitalized on outlandish clickbait titles involving Apple just to incite hysteria to get more views. It really makes LTT have zero credibility because it shows they don't care at all about accurately delivering the news it's all for money and fame
  18. Agree
    DrMacintosh reacted to dilpickle in Your Computer isn't Yours   
    OK but is there a better source for this news than someone's personal blog?
  19. Funny
  20. Funny
    DrMacintosh got a reaction from Letgomyleghoe in Leaked MacBook Air GB5 benchmark shows score higher than 16-inch MacBook Pro; SC higher than 5950X   
    It does not matter how quick your car is on a race track if you intent to use it for hauling..... ARM Macs won't even be able to run Photoshop natively for another year, so as far as I'm concerned Apple Silicon is fighting an uphill battle in terms of getting Pros to try it out. Not to mention the loss of myself as a customer (yeah, the Apple fanboy of the forum) because Bootcamp is gone. 
  21. Agree
    DrMacintosh reacted to charlie_root in software to play mp3 files that works on most operating systems   
    I use mplayer. VLC is very portable as well. Both will handle pretty much any file you throw at them. 
  22. Agree
    DrMacintosh got a reaction from Curufinwe_wins in Leaked MacBook Air GB5 benchmark shows score higher than 16-inch MacBook Pro; SC higher than 5950X   
    But that's what M1 is. It turns the Mac, which was previously a real computer.....into an iPad with a keyboard attached. Apple Silicon Macs run iOS apps, they lose multi-booting OS support, they have to emulate/translate all existing software, they have dumped traditional GPU support, and macOS Big Sur is more locked down on Apple Silicon Macs....
     
    imo these new Mac's aren't computers. They're Chromebooks. 
  23. Funny
    DrMacintosh reacted to idontlikephysx in If Apple never made AirPods, but another company made them, would you still buy them?   
    No clue what an AirPod is.  I don't keep track of Apple products. I don't buy them.
  24. Like
    DrMacintosh got a reaction from ScratchCat in PowerMac G5 case mod preparation   
    This is a guide to disassemble* a 2005 Apple PowerMac G5. The main reason I am doing this is to mod the chassis to support ATX components so I can transfer my components into this classic case. This guide is preparing my G5 to receive a kit from The Lazer Hive which will allow me to install my current rigs Motherboard, GPU, and 120mm radiator. 
     
    Tools you will need: 4mm 9” Ball-Hex screw driver, 3mm Hex screw driver,  T-10 screwdriver, T-8 screwdriver, PH 1 screwdriver, #0 Jewelers Phillips head Screw Driver, 9/32nd- inch nut driver**, 1/4th- inch nut driver**, flathead screw driver (any size or length), pliers
     
    This teardown does not include instructions for HDD removal as my G5 had none, this teardown also does not include many visuals as to how to remove the top shelf.
    ** In the absence of nut-drivers you may use pliers to remove select nuts and screws, especially if you strip them (like I did about 3 times)
     
    Lay your Mac on its side such that the side panel is facing toward you Open the latch at the rear                                       Remove the side panel Remove the plastic air guard                                  Remove the front fan assembly by pulling directly up on it and the tab Disconnect the front speaker and fan assembly cables Remove the front speaker and fan assembly by pulling directly up on it Remove the plastic dowel and pin keeping the G5 shroud in place Pull the G5 shroud horizontally to the left and lift up to remove it Remove the air guide directing air over the CPU heat sync Disconnect the rear fan header                                  Unscrew the GPU PCIe bracket screw                      Unlock the GPU from the PCIe slot and remove the GPU by pulling directly up Apply pressure to the two tabs on the rear fan assembly and remove it by pulling directly up Remove the screws securing the GPU support bracket and remove it by pulling up (mind the tabs) Remove the screws securing the PCIe divider to the chassis and the logic board Remove the PCIe divider by pulling up after the screws have been removed Remove the RAM by releasing the locks on the modules Remove the 8 3mm Hex screws from the heat sync assembly Remove the dual Philips head screws                      Use the 4mm 9” Ball-Hex screw driver to remove the captive screws in the heat sync Remove the heat sync                                                                                                             Lift the metal bracket for the front fan assembly     Release the clips on the back of the metal bracket and remove the fan cable Remove the fan header from the Motherboard         Remove the screws securing the front panel board to the Motherboard Pull back and away on the front panel board to free it from the chassis Remove all connections from the Motherboard       Use the T8 screws to unscrew the leads from the PSU Undo the sudo-standoffs the CPU heat sync used Use the #0 Philips head to unscrew the 9 screws securing the rear fan grill to the chassis Remove the grill assembly                                      You can now lift up the Motherboard, remove it from the chassis Unscrew the two screws securing the PSU shroud and remove the shroud Remove the 4 T10 screws on the bottom of the chassis securing the PSU Remove this standoff to enable removal of the PSU Remove this nut to allow removal of the plastic liner in the chassis Remove the 5 screws securing the fan and HDD caddy to the shelf of the chassis Unlatch the optical drive and remove it by simply pulling up Remove all the 3mm Hex screws from the top shelf Remove the C-clip and push remove the pin holding the latch mechanism in place Remove the latch mechanism Unscrew the T8 screws on the back side of the shelf and remove the shelf Remove the bottom HDD caddy, mind the PCB.   Remove the two screws securing this fan in place Remove the 7 screws securing the top HDD caddy to the chassis Unravel the WiFi antenna from around the lip of the chassis Remove the 3 screws securing the antenna assembly and use a flathead screw driver to pry the back from the chassis Unscrew the 15 T8 screws                                      Success!                                                                   After all this I still cannot decide on where to put my PSU. I can put it in the front, in the shelf, or I can cut the bottom shroud and plop in there……..

  25. Like
    DrMacintosh reacted to wkdpaul in Trudeau government promises to connect 98% of Canadians to high-speed internet by 2026   
    Summary
    The Canadian government announced the launch of the universal broadband fund, a $1.75 billion program unveiled in the federal government's 2019 budget. It's goal is to build broadband infrastructure in remote communities.
     
    Quotes
     
     
    My thoughts
    Seems like good news IMO, we're a large landmass with a huge concentration of the population near the US border, so it makes sense that companies won't invest in infrastructure in remote location without incentives. This will help in the long run, if not before.
     
     
    Sources
    https://www.cbc.ca/amp/1.5794901
     
    Government page about the program ;
    https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/139.nsf/eng/h_00006.html
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