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Curufinwe_wins

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About Curufinwe_wins

  • Title
    ipsa scientia potestas est
  • Birthday June 14

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  • Location
    Midwest, United States
  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Etymology: High Power Computing; Literature; Nuclear Engineering; High Temperature Materials/Corrosion; Physical Chemistry; Water Skiing
  • Occupation
    Nuclear Engineer

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  1. Yes which is where you are most at risk. 300k isn't enough to bully youtube (like LTT or similar 8 figure ones sortof can), but its enough to get all the attention
  2. It's not a hard thought experiment. Ban FB, Twitter, Reddit and do people stop talking online? No. They just find another platform. That platform becomes (if it isn't already) severely undermoderated as a result... back to square 1. Reforming and in particular codifing reasonable (or even achievable) expectations within Section 230 is something everyone in "Big Tech" wants because this "damned if you do, damned if you don't" shit is getting really frustrating to everyone involved. But either way, your no-tolerance perspective on possible errors or inadequacies in contro
  3. Laws are also different in various countries, and that can have an impact on YTs responsibility. Germany has some pretty vague and broad laws prohibiting manufacturing, programming, installing, or spreading software that has the primary goal of circumventing security measures. There were concerns in mid 2000s that the law would make things even worse if it was ever applied too broadly. Of course, the bigger thing is just reach. Being a moderate to big player (but not big enough to tell YT to go fuck itself) is always at far higher risk of being seen and then reported than a random
  4. Lol that thinking would result in the immediate shuttering of literally every discussion or user-generated content site in the world, and every open access forum physically existing. It literally argues for shutting down the LTT forums. It is almost 100% societies problem. Society generates the content AND the abusers. I say almost because enabling is still a thing, but society has SOOO MUCH more responsibility in this situation than any one forum (presuming they are actually following the law). Plus like this is assuming every country on the w
  5. I think that's all fine things to worry about and want changed.
  6. The code isn't the problem (in the sense that the bias doesn't come from the code). The problem is machine learning learning racism correlates to violence. Or more problematically, structural racism exists and thus perpetuating it via hiring/credit/similar recommendations. It can only see/emphasize the biases already existing in the userbase
  7. It's not about seeing the "ridiculousness", it's about the obvious next step being reporting it. Like obviously that's exactly what happens. There isn't a world in which anything else happens. Name one company (including BBC) willing to take preemptive blame for screwups and not try to cover their asses afterwards. I did read the article before commenting. Just not surprised companies act like companies. Apple still employs Foxconn after all.
  8. I don't know UK law, but in the US, you would still have to report the exchange regardless of what circumstances under which it took place. Legally. There are no exceptions for "was trying to help" once you are aware of the content in the fullest sense. I really don't see that as anything other than legal departments covering ass.
  9. The big stuff is actually simple math though. Like people saying even one example is too many, well Facebook took down literally 5 million sexual content posts in 2020. That ignores the mistakes or claims they reject. Dedicating thousands of moderators (which they actually do, 15k at last count), is thousands of human beings they are literally torturing in order to remove this stuff from the platform for the rest of us. Like actually imagine it being your only job in life to comb through just the worst scum the earth has to offer. Imagine being completely crushed or pot
  10. As a Tesla owner with normal autopilot... literally the only feature that interests me one bit is the auto lane change, and only on big road trips (9k miles in my car in 3 months). Normal autopilot does everything I'd want it to for a regular drive. Oh and in general, it still gets spooked really easily, so yeah, if you dislike random heart-rending braking when the road dips under a bridge etc, not the tool for you.
  11. It would be fair to say that I am not an expert at these things either. Ask me about nuclear power and/or engineering materials for power systems and I'll straight up claim expert level knowledge. This? Nope. I do remember anandtech trying to break out the IO chiplet and infinity fabric consumption from first gen Zen and TR, and that was what I was basing my standards on. I agree with most of the details you say here. According to Andrei's work, Cinebench is relatively light on both Zen and M1 compared to some other workloads. They saw consumption in spec
  12. It is impressive. Just noting this is the only benchmark I've seen so far that shows Intel can hold its own single core, and that shows a 4800U as being faster than the M1 in multithreaded loading. Everything else we've seen so far looks even better for the M1 than this does.
  13. Cinebench is probably the most favorable benchmark so far for x86 btw. I'm sure some actual AVX codes will try to be run soon enough which might look silly, but this for now can be mostly seen as a worst case for Apple.
  14. I have a canyon spectral similarly that was around 1700 dollars, but yes. When in the US you walk into Walmart and buy a bike for 100 dollars, and AMD wants to sell the same bike (with probably even less QC work) for 3.5x the price we should call them out on it. (In normal times) you can get ludicrously better and safer bikes for this price point new (ignoring used). Yes upselling isn't uncommon, but I think that isn't an excuse to not call it out. If AMD can't do the work to make the bike even remotely safe (it wasn't safe for road riding even before they brought it into a shop),
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