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harryk

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  1. Informative
    harryk got a reaction from akio123008 in Are 12V corded power tools a thing?   
    Cordless tools are so good now that I don't see any real advantage to having 12V corded power tools. If you need more power, 12V is going to be the limitation.
     
    There are some corded low voltage specialty tools. Proxxon has a small lineup. Though these are intended for precision in-shop work, the benefit being a smaller more manageable tool in the hand with power management on the bench.
  2. Informative
    harryk got a reaction from Ash_Kechummm in Is a movie "Cinematic" only because of framerate?   
    To me the higher frame rate clips are easily discernible and less preferred. In the higher frame rate clips I notice motion more clearly and it breaks the immersion of the moment. For example in the first few seconds of the quiet clip, my eyes are immediately drawn to her eye lids when she blinks and it looks unnaturally fast in the high frame rate clip and ruins the mood. All I notice is how quickly she opened her eyes rather than the calming mood the picture conveys. 
     
    As others has pointed out it definitely has to do with what we are accustomed to. Though I argue there is an actual physical reason as well, motion blur.
     
    There is a rule of thumb in cinematography to shoot at 24 fps with a 180 deg shutter angle. This yields a certain amount of motion blur which looks "natural" (whatever that means). A reduced shutter angle results in less motion blur and sharper images which tend to convey more motion and action, though can sometimes look hyper-realistic. The same happens with a higher frame rate which inherently has less motion blur. 
  3. Agree
    harryk got a reaction from Bombastinator in Vinegar induced rust on sd card   
    If it works, it works. 
     
    But dunking the card in vinegar was definitely not the right thing to do and likely ruined the card. Vinegar is a solution of acetic acid. The vinegar likely made its way under the plastic housing and soaked the internal chips and circuitry. When the card dried (it might not have under the plastic) it left the acetic acid behind in crystalized form. Even though nominally dry, the acid will continue to corrode the circuitry. 
  4. Agree
    harryk reacted to AngryBeaver in Why gamers dont start to mine to destroy miners?   
    He was just giving the 3090 as a form of measurement. For etherium for example any card under about 5gb of vram (probably 6 in a day when difficulty increases) will be unable to mine it. So then you have the fact that eth mining is more memory speed dependent. So for example a 2070s would only get about 37mh/s where my 3080 can pull 100-105 mh/s. Then you have to look at how much power is consumed for that hash rate. For a 2070s I would guess it is in the ballpark of 150watts, vs my 3080 using 207w.

    Anyways the point is that of the gpus you gave as examples some of them cannot even mine Etherium. The others will do so, but the cost effectiveness would be much lower as well as the actual hash rates. Then you will just give people a taste of mining which will just lead to more miners lol. When I can pay for a 3080 in about 2 months worth of mining it becomes very tempting to just keep adding cards.
  5. Funny
    harryk got a reaction from Noahi5-3337u in Should I buy a 2012 MacBook Pro in 2020   
    Look for a 2015 model. It is the newest of that design generation.
     
    Otherwise don't get anything older than the Late 2013 model. It was the first with Haswell chips which brought a major improvement in battery life. It is also the oldest supported by the newest version of macOS. 
     
    128 GB SSD is too small for most things, though you can upgrade it yourself. You cannot upgrade the memory yourself so think about your needs and purchase the right laptop. 8 GB will be enough for most things.
  6. Like
    harryk got a reaction from RGProductions in Living furniture free   
    As someone who lives minimally and sorta tried the no furniture thing here's my advice. Don't try to plan ahead and furnish the whole place. Move in with nothing. Wait for your needs to become apparent and make deliberate purchases to satisfy those needs. After a few years you will probably have purchased several pieces of furniture but only those which are actually necessary.
     
    - If you're not already knowledgeable, it is time to learn about room treatments.
    - That's up to you. Decorations? A good chair?
    - If you want guests to be comfortable sleeping over, a guest room with a proper bed is warranted.
    - Again up to you. My advice is to try different things and discover what you prefer most. You can try quick DIY versions of things to see if the concept, like a standing desk, works before spending big bucks on something high quality.
  7. Like
    harryk got a reaction from PlayStation 2 in Living furniture free   
    As someone who lives minimally and sorta tried the no furniture thing here's my advice. Don't try to plan ahead and furnish the whole place. Move in with nothing. Wait for your needs to become apparent and make deliberate purchases to satisfy those needs. After a few years you will probably have purchased several pieces of furniture but only those which are actually necessary.
     
    - If you're not already knowledgeable, it is time to learn about room treatments.
    - That's up to you. Decorations? A good chair?
    - If you want guests to be comfortable sleeping over, a guest room with a proper bed is warranted.
    - Again up to you. My advice is to try different things and discover what you prefer most. You can try quick DIY versions of things to see if the concept, like a standing desk, works before spending big bucks on something high quality.
  8. Agree
    harryk got a reaction from LAwLz in Apple’s Pro Display XDR – A PC Guy’s Perspective   
    That is actually a very good reason to use a reference monitor for creating content. 
     
    The manufacturers of displays aim to accurately reproduce colors as best they can, but between cost constraints and manufacturing variances not all displays show the same colors. Imagine measuring the color red on a 10 point scale, with 0 being white and 10 being a deep red. The display manufacturer aims for the display to show a 5 red as a 5, but a given display may show it as a 4, 5 or 6.
     
    If a content creator used a random cheap display to edit a photo they will likely use a display that is slightly off. Maybe it is a -1, so a 5 red looks like a 4. The editor then boosts the red in the image file so it appears correct on their display; now the 5 red is saved in the file as a 6. Then a consumer looks at this image with another random cheap display; this one is a +1. Now the original 5 red appears as a 7 to the consumer. Far off from what the original creator intended.
     
    If the content creator used a reference display where a 5 red is guaranteed to be a 5, there would be a maximum variance of +/−1, rather than +/−2.
  9. Like
    harryk reacted to straight_stewie in Talk to an Industry Expert?   
    So if we can assume for a moment that you are planning on going to a university where the CS department is part of the engineering department, you might actually learn quite a bit without including your minor in the analysis.

    The CS department at my alma mater required these other courses (names are representative, and do not include obvious CS classes like "Introduction to programming"):
    Introduction to college Chemistry Introduction to college Physics Introduction to Digital Circuits Introduction to Microprocessor Design Calculus I through Calculus IV Two Science electives (offered by the college of engineering, most students chose physics electives) Two math electives (most students chose statistics and Linear Algebra) Four general electives (this allows you to complete a non-CS minor, and is where you can differentiate yourself)  
    Differentiation within the major is provided by 27 hours of CS department technical electives, which are generally courses that dive deeper into things like Operating Systems, database design, "compilers", Machine Learning...


    The big problem with programming that many people don't understand is that it generally requires a whole lot of knowledge specific to the industry in which you are working. A few examples of this:
    If you're a developer working on flight control systems for a new aircraft, it would be very nice if you knew a thing or two about how aircraft fly. You don't have to be a serious expert on the mechanics of flight, the business will have people who help you with that, but you'll need to know fairly advanced stuff about flight off the top of your head. Think about it: Would you want to fly in an aircraft where the developers of the software running the aircraft knew nothing about how planes fly? If you're a developer working on an online security trading platform, it would be very nice if you knew a thing or two about accounting, as well as securities law. Just look at all the trouble RobinHood has had, with a new lawsuit from the SEC that basic alleges that they lied. RobinHood's response was essentially that they didn't know they were lying (which means they didn't know what they were doing). They have had more than one glitch which allowed unqualified users to take on infinite amounts of leverage (in at least one case, the leverage was not on the users back, which is terrible business and actually cost RobinHood 100's of millions of dollars before they fixed the issue). If you're a developer working on maintaining a database of student records for an educational software company, it would make things alot easier if you knew a thing or two about what statistics were important in measuring student growth. Which brings me to the next point: All of that only matters if you are actually a good programmer. Any competent programmer can implement and test an already existing specification for a "thing". It takes a whole 'nother level of knowledge to be writing the specifications, and is where the jobs get really very fun, where you start rising up in a company, and where job titles start to include fun words like "architect", "analyst", and "lead".
     
    The next BIG thing is a very tough question. For example, the consumption of House Crickets (the little grasshopper like insects) is increasing rapidly. There is a shortage of large cricket producers, and the industry is very speculative (businesses come and go rapidly). Human consumption of Crickets (as food) is growing rapidly, and once it takes off will inevitably be "the next BIG business". From my own experience as a small commercial cricket producer (it was convenient), intelligent analysis and automation, without overdoing it, is the key to being a competitive, and profitable, cricket producer.

    Or, on the other hand, quantum computers are the next BIG thing.
    Or, yet again, AI is the next BIG thing.
    Vr was supposed to be the next BIG thing.
    There's no telling what the next BIG thing actually is. Remember when the next BIG thing was flying cars?
     
    To make the point clear, we can look at investment strategies. It's common knowledge that past performance does not indicate future performance, and it's common knowledge that humans cannot reliably predict the future. So how do some people, like Warren Buffet for example, become so successful in long term investment holdings? It's really very simple: Past performance does indicate future generalities, if you actually know what you are looking at.

    Or, in shorter words, don't try to get on the next big thing. Try to get on the current thing that will get bigger.
     
    Another option is to look at popular statements, and try to make them lies. For example, all highschool math teachers (every single one I swear) used to say "you have to memorize this because you won't always have a calculator in your pocket". Well, Apple really made liars out of them didn't they? I don't know a single person who doesn't always have an entire computer in their pocket. Businessmen the world over used to say "the internet is just a fad", and they laughed all the way to the bank when everyone else fell down in 2001. But here we are where the FAANG group of businesses is included in the biggest and most stable businesses in the world. Everyone thought that Taxi services would always be a stable business. Yet Uber knew better.

    I mean, it's tough to give advice about what the next big thing is going to be, but those are two strategies that tend to work out well (but not always).
  10. Like
    harryk got a reaction from bearnard1212 in Robotic Missions to Mars   
    Do you not know about the Spirit and Opportunity rovers? NASA sent the twin rovers to Mars in 2003 for what was a planned 90 day mission. Spirit lasted for 2269 days and Opportunity for 5352 days! That's 15 years of driving on another planet, longer than the average age of a car in the US (12 years).
     
    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter launched in 2005 for a planned 2 year mission. It is still operating today and NASA expects to keep using it for another 10 years. 
     
    The Curiosity rover launched in 2011 and is still operating today. It's RTG power source has a minimum lifetime of 14 years and if the Pioneer and Voyager probes (also RTG powered) are examples to go by, we can expect Curiosity to continue operating for 30+ years.
  11. Agree
    harryk got a reaction from Senzelian in Should reviewers accept early product samples or purchase their own?   
    My opinion is that it is always biased. Simply by having the manufacturer select who receives an early product sample and who doesn't. Even if the reviewer pledges to be independent and unbiased, every reviewer will test things with their method and put their spin on it. So why would the manufacturer select reviewers whose methods and general opinions are not going to produce a positive outcome.
     
    My opinion is there are always strings attached when the reviewer receives a privileged position and receives an early product sample. I want to know what other people's opinions are or if I'm the weird one.
     
  12. Like
    harryk reacted to Mark Kaine in UPDATE: NVIDIA backtracks - Hardware Unboxed blacklisted from receiving GeForce FE review samples over “focus on rasterization over ray-tracing”   
    yes, but that rises the question can you call a review that's based on the condition of having a "free" "review sample" that apparently comes with certain conditions "unbiased"? 
     
    I think not, those should be clearly labeled as "advertising" because that's what they arguably are *regardless* of the intentions of the "reviewer". 
     
     
  13. Like
    harryk reacted to porina in UPDATE: NVIDIA backtracks - Hardware Unboxed blacklisted from receiving GeForce FE review samples over “focus on rasterization over ray-tracing”   
    I had to look back at my previous post in this thread, now that I've seen WAN show and there is more information now. With the update information I partially agree with Linus, but not entirely. I still think, if you really want true independence between "reviewers" and manufacturers, is to break the direct relationship between them. As long as there is any direct transaction between them, there will always be the potential for this to happen, regardless if it does or not. That could work more easily than you think, because if it applies to everyone, there remains a level playing field. So for example, everyone would have to go through AIBs, not directly with AMD/Intel/nvidia.
  14. Like
    harryk reacted to Moonzy in UPDATE: NVIDIA backtracks - Hardware Unboxed blacklisted from receiving GeForce FE review samples over “focus on rasterization over ray-tracing”   
    Yes, and his point still stands
    A company doesn't have to agree with the way reviewers review things, and stop sending them review samples, of which they're not obligated to in the first place.
     
    But in this situation where day 1 review gets most of the views, not having a day 1 review will impact their status as a reliable reviewer, in a time sensitive topic.
     
    The day 1 review is kinda the problem, if you ask me, since reviewers have to rely on manufacturer to provide them the hardware to test, which if Nvidia is now dictating what can be and can not be said, means the day 1 "reviews" are nothing more than marketing.
     
    While Nvidia said they're allowed to use AIB cards, Nvidia themselves prohibited AIB reviews until a few days after their FE cards review, which in itself a BS move by Nvidia already.
  15. Like
    harryk reacted to TheBahrbarian in UPDATE: NVIDIA backtracks - Hardware Unboxed blacklisted from receiving GeForce FE review samples over “focus on rasterization over ray-tracing”   
    I think Linus wasn't necessarily attacking Nvidia for not sending them a sample, he reiterated that Nvidia (and other companies) frequently do not send review samples to media for a variety of reasons and they have every right to do so. Rather, the issue lies with the precedent set by the email. The email itself frankly, came across as extremely aggressive and disrespectful, it was really surprising to read.
     
    I mean, is he wrong about how consumers after this will have noticeably less trust in media? I sure will. Clearly they are not afraid to do whatever it takes to ensure that media reviews say what Nvidia wants, not their honest objective opinion. Especially when its quite obvious HUB did spend entire videos discussing RT and DLSS (even being featured on Nvidia's website lol), yet they didn't say exactly what Nvidia wanted. 
     
    If consumers think it's ok that companies leverage any power they want to control the media coverage of their products and censor negative coverage, then we have no trustworthy reviews left, and that doesn't sound too great to me.
  16. Like
    harryk reacted to FakeNSA in Robotic Missions to Mars   
    And today I learned!
    Thank you. I certainly hope they keep her moving for decades to come. 
  17. Like
    harryk got a reaction from FakeNSA in Robotic Missions to Mars   
    You may be right, but Curiosity has an important addition which will help. Whereas the Voyagers pulled power directly from the RTG, Curiosity includes a set of lithium batteries which are repeatedly charged off the RTG. The batteries then provide auxiliary power when the RTG cannot provide enough during high loads. The battery could serve as the primary power source when the RTG decays allowing for spurts of activity in-between charging sessions. Though it remains to be seen how long the lithium batteries will last. 
  18. Agree
    harryk got a reaction from whm1974 in Robotic Missions to Mars   
    Why do you say that?
     
    I say the majority of missions were successful and some exceedingly so. Almost everything we know about Mars we learned from robotic probes sent to the planet. 
  19. Like
    harryk reacted to DoctorNick in Robotic Missions to Mars   
    I think you need to read more about the topic
  20. Agree
    harryk got a reaction from zeusthemoose in Robotic Missions to Mars   
    Why do you say that?
     
    I say the majority of missions were successful and some exceedingly so. Almost everything we know about Mars we learned from robotic probes sent to the planet. 
  21. Agree
    harryk got a reaction from TetraSky in Hi , I am new here. I need help from you kings   
    What you are seeing is an internal reflection within the camera creating a ghost image. This is a completely normal, albeit annoying, side effect of physics and will be present in all cameras though some mitigate it better than others. In your example photos it is particularly noticeable because you have a very bright light source (i.e. chili's sign, illuminated window) in an otherwise dimly lit scene. 
     
    A few things you can do:
    - If you have case with a protective cover over the camera, remove it. This is just another optical surface which can create reflections.
    - Clean the exterior surface of the camera lens. A dirty lens will create reflections.
    - Control the light in your scene and shoot images and video from angles which minimize the glare and reflections
    - Use software to remove the glare and reflections.
  22. Informative
    harryk got a reaction from Moonzy in Hi , I am new here. I need help from you kings   
    What you are seeing is an internal reflection within the camera creating a ghost image. This is a completely normal, albeit annoying, side effect of physics and will be present in all cameras though some mitigate it better than others. In your example photos it is particularly noticeable because you have a very bright light source (i.e. chili's sign, illuminated window) in an otherwise dimly lit scene. 
     
    A few things you can do:
    - If you have case with a protective cover over the camera, remove it. This is just another optical surface which can create reflections.
    - Clean the exterior surface of the camera lens. A dirty lens will create reflections.
    - Control the light in your scene and shoot images and video from angles which minimize the glare and reflections
    - Use software to remove the glare and reflections.
  23. Like
    harryk got a reaction from FakeNSA in Bird takeover?   
    Not too far off actually...
     
    The Party Parrot emote is modeled after an old viral video of a parrot humping a zoologist's head
    https://knowyourmeme.com/memes/party-parrot
  24. Agree
    harryk got a reaction from dalekphalm in Internet culture - things like "/s"   
    There are other uses of the forward slash in mostly older internet culture.
     
    /thread or /t means "close thread" 
    It's used as sort of a mic drop to indicate nothing more needs to be said.
  25. Like
    harryk got a reaction from whm1974 in Bird takeover?   
    Not too far off actually...
     
    The Party Parrot emote is modeled after an old viral video of a parrot humping a zoologist's head
    https://knowyourmeme.com/memes/party-parrot
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