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MageTank

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  1. Like
    MageTank got a reaction from FruitOfTheLum in Reviewer Ethics   
    I am not a "reviewer" per se, but I work in a lab that happens to receive sample parts from the very same vendors Linus would source his review samples from and I might be able to offer some insight on the ethics of keeping review components and whether it impacts the results of tests.
     
    First and foremost, it is important to understand that your mindset as a consumer and the mindset of a reviewer/testing engineer is going to be completely different. Products we receive have NO retail value and cannot be sold whatsoever (at least under the terms I receive my parts, they can't). Secondly, the hardware is going to get abused in a way that we would not ethically be able to sell it to someone else or consider it to hold its retail value after having tested it. The consequences of selling these parts (and even giving these parts away, in the cases of engineering samples) is that we lose our vendor relationships/access to these sample parts and have to wait until retail channels are available to conduct our testing and reviews. This is not ideal, especially when you work in a systems designs environment and need a lead time on tests before mass production.
     
    Obviously my need for samples is to determine component compatibility and to prep the hardware/software environments for an ideal end-user experience. This differs from that of a reviewer, where their need for a sample is often to critique the product to give their audience insight on the quality and value of the product. There is a small parallel here, but not much of an overlap. Still, the same limitations do apply.
     
    If I fail to catch an issue before production with my review samples, the customers experience will suffer and the quality/perception of my products/brands will be impacted. If a reviewer fails to accurately depict a product to their audience, their reputation will suffer and they will no longer be viewed as a trusted source and their audience will leave them, risking their livelihood. I would wager that they wouldn't risk their livelihood on receiving free GPU's just to appease their relationship with these companies. At the end of the day, we all understand it's business and very rarely will you find someone in this industry that takes a review personally.
     
    To that, I'll say it's not unethical to keep a product after a review, as long as the product is never to be sold and is only used for further comparison/testing. Purchasing review samples from retailers is simply not feasible given the testing timeframe and methodology one must subject the products to in order to obtain accurate results, and reviewers/system engineers have target dates to meet before these/their products hit the shelves.
     
    I do agree that it is unethical to be compensated in exchange for a review of a product, regardless of the connotation of the exposure. This is why reputable sources go to great lengths to make sure their content is listed as "paid sponsorships" or "promotional ads" to differentiate them from the standard content. I personally avoid this content like the plague because it offers no objective insight on product performance beyond what is written in a script by a first party, but I do not see promotional sponsors/ads as unethical as long as it is outlined as such in advance.
     
    I also disagree with your assertation that its unethical to have an opinion in a sponsored ad. There are plenty of people that choose their sponsored ads responsibly and do so because they firmly believe in the product and what they say about said product. Plenty of people that will stake their reputation on the line by both being sponsored by a product and that is fine, as long as they are willing to accept the consequences of that going awry and don't walk it back the moment it does by saying "It wasn't actually our opinion, we just said what they wanted us to say". If you are sponsored by a product and give your opinion on said sponsored product, stand behind it.
  2. Agree
    MageTank got a reaction from Jonathan Lee in I Need Help Picking PC Parts. PT 2   
    Not entirely sure how it's Micro Center's fault that everyone wants a GPU right now, but I suppose people will find an excuse to blame anyone these days, lol.
     
    If you don't have the money to buy the parts now, anything you try to finalize will be irrelevant as it's extremely unlikely anything will remain in-stock long enough for you to be able to purchase it. Your best bet is to aim for a specific price goal, save to that value, then go in and buy the best that you can get with that money.
     
    Also keep in mind that Intel's 12th gen CPU's are launching soon, so that might change the prices of the older generation processors which may save you some money by the time you can afford the full build.
     
    It might also be worth looking into buying a cheap pre-built with the platform specs you are looking for and simply upgrading the GPU (or vice versa, finding one with the GPU you want and swapping the components that can be readily found).
  3. Agree
    MageTank got a reaction from LAwLz in Reviewer Ethics   
    This is an interesting scenario you've outlined and it does raise an interesting question. In my example above, I mentioned:
    If the Tesla is being used as a daily driver without the intent to use for further testing & comparison, I would say it's no longer under review and it would be unethical to use it in that capacity. When I receive parts/products from vendors, they are inventoried and placed on shelves when not in use. When they reach an age where they are no longer relevant or used in production (or for the sake of the review analogy, relevant for consumer reviews for sake of comparison), they get sent off to a recycling location that can securely dispose of the products and ensure they are not sold to the public. Some of our vendor partners allow us to ship them back to their facilities which is helpful, but some have us handle the recycling ourselves. I certainly wouldn't take the products home and use them myself, that just seems weird.
     
    I don't want to put words in @BuckGup's mouth, but he might be referring to ADA or WCAG compliance. While not technically an "ethical" responsibility of youtubers (it falls more on the site owner to ensure compliance, and would definitely be relevant for written review sources such as Tomshardware or GamersNexus), Youtube videos falls outside of this being a hard requirement. That said, I'd definitely prefer to see titles that accurately reflect the content so people with screen reading software have an idea of what it is they are about to consume, but alas, clickbait metrics are far too appealing for those wishing to market themselves to a wider audience.
  4. Agree
    MageTank got a reaction from GDRRiley in Reviewer Ethics   
    I am not a "reviewer" per se, but I work in a lab that happens to receive sample parts from the very same vendors Linus would source his review samples from and I might be able to offer some insight on the ethics of keeping review components and whether it impacts the results of tests.
     
    First and foremost, it is important to understand that your mindset as a consumer and the mindset of a reviewer/testing engineer is going to be completely different. Products we receive have NO retail value and cannot be sold whatsoever (at least under the terms I receive my parts, they can't). Secondly, the hardware is going to get abused in a way that we would not ethically be able to sell it to someone else or consider it to hold its retail value after having tested it. The consequences of selling these parts (and even giving these parts away, in the cases of engineering samples) is that we lose our vendor relationships/access to these sample parts and have to wait until retail channels are available to conduct our testing and reviews. This is not ideal, especially when you work in a systems designs environment and need a lead time on tests before mass production.
     
    Obviously my need for samples is to determine component compatibility and to prep the hardware/software environments for an ideal end-user experience. This differs from that of a reviewer, where their need for a sample is often to critique the product to give their audience insight on the quality and value of the product. There is a small parallel here, but not much of an overlap. Still, the same limitations do apply.
     
    If I fail to catch an issue before production with my review samples, the customers experience will suffer and the quality/perception of my products/brands will be impacted. If a reviewer fails to accurately depict a product to their audience, their reputation will suffer and they will no longer be viewed as a trusted source and their audience will leave them, risking their livelihood. I would wager that they wouldn't risk their livelihood on receiving free GPU's just to appease their relationship with these companies. At the end of the day, we all understand it's business and very rarely will you find someone in this industry that takes a review personally.
     
    To that, I'll say it's not unethical to keep a product after a review, as long as the product is never to be sold and is only used for further comparison/testing. Purchasing review samples from retailers is simply not feasible given the testing timeframe and methodology one must subject the products to in order to obtain accurate results, and reviewers/system engineers have target dates to meet before these/their products hit the shelves.
     
    I do agree that it is unethical to be compensated in exchange for a review of a product, regardless of the connotation of the exposure. This is why reputable sources go to great lengths to make sure their content is listed as "paid sponsorships" or "promotional ads" to differentiate them from the standard content. I personally avoid this content like the plague because it offers no objective insight on product performance beyond what is written in a script by a first party, but I do not see promotional sponsors/ads as unethical as long as it is outlined as such in advance.
     
    I also disagree with your assertation that its unethical to have an opinion in a sponsored ad. There are plenty of people that choose their sponsored ads responsibly and do so because they firmly believe in the product and what they say about said product. Plenty of people that will stake their reputation on the line by both being sponsored by a product and that is fine, as long as they are willing to accept the consequences of that going awry and don't walk it back the moment it does by saying "It wasn't actually our opinion, we just said what they wanted us to say". If you are sponsored by a product and give your opinion on said sponsored product, stand behind it.
  5. Like
    MageTank got a reaction from Spotty in Reviewer Ethics   
    I am not a "reviewer" per se, but I work in a lab that happens to receive sample parts from the very same vendors Linus would source his review samples from and I might be able to offer some insight on the ethics of keeping review components and whether it impacts the results of tests.
     
    First and foremost, it is important to understand that your mindset as a consumer and the mindset of a reviewer/testing engineer is going to be completely different. Products we receive have NO retail value and cannot be sold whatsoever (at least under the terms I receive my parts, they can't). Secondly, the hardware is going to get abused in a way that we would not ethically be able to sell it to someone else or consider it to hold its retail value after having tested it. The consequences of selling these parts (and even giving these parts away, in the cases of engineering samples) is that we lose our vendor relationships/access to these sample parts and have to wait until retail channels are available to conduct our testing and reviews. This is not ideal, especially when you work in a systems designs environment and need a lead time on tests before mass production.
     
    Obviously my need for samples is to determine component compatibility and to prep the hardware/software environments for an ideal end-user experience. This differs from that of a reviewer, where their need for a sample is often to critique the product to give their audience insight on the quality and value of the product. There is a small parallel here, but not much of an overlap. Still, the same limitations do apply.
     
    If I fail to catch an issue before production with my review samples, the customers experience will suffer and the quality/perception of my products/brands will be impacted. If a reviewer fails to accurately depict a product to their audience, their reputation will suffer and they will no longer be viewed as a trusted source and their audience will leave them, risking their livelihood. I would wager that they wouldn't risk their livelihood on receiving free GPU's just to appease their relationship with these companies. At the end of the day, we all understand it's business and very rarely will you find someone in this industry that takes a review personally.
     
    To that, I'll say it's not unethical to keep a product after a review, as long as the product is never to be sold and is only used for further comparison/testing. Purchasing review samples from retailers is simply not feasible given the testing timeframe and methodology one must subject the products to in order to obtain accurate results, and reviewers/system engineers have target dates to meet before these/their products hit the shelves.
     
    I do agree that it is unethical to be compensated in exchange for a review of a product, regardless of the connotation of the exposure. This is why reputable sources go to great lengths to make sure their content is listed as "paid sponsorships" or "promotional ads" to differentiate them from the standard content. I personally avoid this content like the plague because it offers no objective insight on product performance beyond what is written in a script by a first party, but I do not see promotional sponsors/ads as unethical as long as it is outlined as such in advance.
     
    I also disagree with your assertation that its unethical to have an opinion in a sponsored ad. There are plenty of people that choose their sponsored ads responsibly and do so because they firmly believe in the product and what they say about said product. Plenty of people that will stake their reputation on the line by both being sponsored by a product and that is fine, as long as they are willing to accept the consequences of that going awry and don't walk it back the moment it does by saying "It wasn't actually our opinion, we just said what they wanted us to say". If you are sponsored by a product and give your opinion on said sponsored product, stand behind it.
  6. Informative
    MageTank reacted to abit-sean in Price on this Alienware CPU   
    I know the European ones used Abit motherboards, AV8 3rd eye if I remember correctly but that rear IO doesn't match.
  7. Funny
    MageTank got a reaction from HairlessMonkeyBoy in Samsung Demos In-Memory Processing for HBM2, GDDR6, DDR4, and LPDDR5X   
    I think you are missing the point here. It has nothing to do with you calling it a "memory controller". That part I completely understand. Ignorance is often never intentional and I can get beyond that quite easily, especially on subjects as complicated as memory. The part I don't understand is your decision to quote my explanation of controllers vs circuits and use that as a springboard to go off on a tangent for your personal vendetta against Samsung's use of "AI". If anyone is being anal here, it's the dude shouting about marketing buzzwords he doesn't like every opportunity he can.
     
    That said, I don't know the other guy you're referring to, but I'll gladly die on this sword and argue until you give it up. It's a slow day at work and HLK testing takes a really long time.
  8. Agree
    MageTank reacted to LAwLz in Samsung Demos In-Memory Processing for HBM2, GDDR6, DDR4, and LPDDR5X   
    Good thing Samsung aren't calling it AI then. They are saying it is "in-memory processing for ML accelerators".
    It's memory designed for AI accelerators.
     
    No it's not.
    Cache prefetching is loading things into memory tat they think might be needed, before it is needed.
    This is doing processing on the data while it is being held in memory. 
     
    Loading something and processing something are two very different things.
     
     
    Not sure why you got such a strong vendetta against the word "AI", but I think you have gotten a bit confused. When people say something like "our camera uses AI" or "our camera uses machine learning", they are typically referring to the fact that their program uses an algorithm that was created by an AI (if you're okay with calling machine learning AI, which I think it is).
    For example my phone's camera has a scene optimization feature. When point the camera at something, it detects what I am pointing it at and tweaks the settings accordingly. That algorithm is rather static. The camera app does not get better the more pictures I take. It sometimes gets updated through a software update but that's not really machine learning on the device itself. But I think it's rather nitpicky to say my camera app doesn't use AI to optimize the settings. It doesn't train itself, but it does run the algorithm created by an AI, the same way the AI did when it was trained, and without the machine learning the picture would look different. So I guess if we want to be a bit pedantic we could say the camera doesn't use AI and instead it is "enhanced by AI". 
  9. Agree
    MageTank reacted to leadeater in Samsung Demos In-Memory Processing for HBM2, GDDR6, DDR4, and LPDDR5X   
    Well for me as it relates to the story extra memory registers or memory buffers isn't similar to these in memory chip processors. Registers and Buffers cannot be told to do anything, no computation can be sent to them. These on chip processors can do something and we can control them and issue computational work to them.
     
    Sort of doesn't really matter what type of work can be done on them or how much we think it's useful, it's quite a lot different and entirely new development for memory chips, just not necessarily fixed function processing units themselves.
     
    Today these might only be able to handle FP16 workloads, and specific instruction types, but Samsung is already planning to expand the capabilities which will open more uses cases to be explored and then one day it might be actually useful to us with our smartphones, CPUs and GPUs or w/e.
     
    Samsung wouldn't be looking to put it in LPDDR5 if there was no clear usage for consumer devices, LPDDR5 market is almost entirely consumer devices from what I understand. Does also seem like Automotive use it so maybe it could be more for that.
  10. Agree
    MageTank got a reaction from Dreckssackblase in Security flaw allows Windows admin privileges just by plugging in a Razer peripheral   
    I am confused. Is this an exploit that can be abused remotely? Or does it require that the attacker be physically in front of the system plugging a Razer device in? If it's the latter, then I fail to see the usefulness of this exploit because anyone that allows an attacker physical access to their system has already compromised their own security to the highest extent. I mean, who needs a Razer USB device when I can plug some of my own USB devices in? lol.
     
    If it can be exploited remotely, then that's definitely a big whoops on Razer's part.
  11. Informative
    MageTank reacted to wanderingfool2 in Security flaw allows Windows admin privileges just by plugging in a Razer peripheral   
    This is an in person attack.  This is more important in work place environments, where plug and play is enabled.  It allows a limited user to escalate and be able to access things they shouldn't.
     
    An example being, you want to gain access to the password to the IT department password.  Normally you don't have an ability to install a key logger onto the computer (not without using exploits).  This way makes it a lot more trivial.  From there, you "break" your computer and the IT person who is trying to fix it now is compromised (as you can see everything he is typing on your computer).  Or another example being, cases where you share computers (day shift and night shift concepts)...you could use it to spy on other people.  Or if you set it up so your kids have a non-admin account so they don't get into as much trouble...they can use this to circumvent it all.
     
    In person privilege escalation, while not as powerful as remote, is still a real security concern...just not likely for the day to day consumer.
  12. Funny
    MageTank got a reaction from Dr_Whom in NBMiner Partially Cracks Nvidia Anti-Mining Limiter, Restores 70% Performance on Ampere LHR GPUs   
    Don't mind me, I am just here for another round of "You're not using your hardware the way I want you to use it and that makes me mad".
     
    You are aware that the industry knew this silica shortage was coming since early 2019, right? We knew this would happen, regardless of mining, regardless of gaming, it was inevitable. What we didn't anticipate was a pandemic thrown on top of that, forcing more people to work from home, driving up demand while destroying production & logistic output in the middle of said shortage. If you honestly believe mining is the biggest cause of the shortage here, you are being narrow-minded.
     
    Even if all of the miners decided to become environmentalists overnight and donate their GPU's to starving gamers, they would not have enough GPU's to satiate the demand in the industry right now.
     
    Trust me, I need a GPU more than anyone right now. I am over here trying to survive with an RTX 2080 Ti that doesn't even have HDMI 2.1. I can't even run my 4K OLED TV at 120hz even though I really, really want to. I know none of you can possibly understand what it is like to be me right now, I endure this struggle because I can, because the world needs me to. I will endeavor to persevere...
     
     
  13. Informative
    MageTank reacted to porina in Intel Arc - discrete GPUs get a name and date - TSMC confirmed!   
    I tried to look up the exact statement, and Intel have recently said they are producing more 10nm wafers than 14nm wafers, marking that transition. I think it safe to assume it wont be Intel 14nm. Yield I don't think has ever been publicly stated so that's anyone's guess. My gut feeling is, if Intel make it internally, then it will be on either 10SF or 7. It depends on when they locked the design. Both 10SF and 7 should be performance competitive, with 7 having better power efficiency. I was surprised to see Ice Lake server was still on old 10nm. Presumably they locked that design long ago and couldn't switch it to newer 10nm when they became available. 
     
    I'm not up to speed on speculation of availability of other fabs, and if Intel has had history with them. While Intel talked about going external earlier this year, the gap is too short for that to happen unless they had been in negotiation in secret for far longer before the public statements. So my personal guess is this wont be externally made.
     
    Quick recap in case people can't keep up with Intel process names:
    (older) 10nm as used in Ice Lake mobile and now Ice Lake server. Did not scale well with clock and hits a wall around 4 GHz. Not good.
    10SF or SuperFin: Used in Tiger Lake. Unblocks the clock scaling and improves power efficiency.
    Intel 7 (formerly known as 10SFE or SuperFin Enhanced): to be used for Alder Lake which will be released before Arc. Expected to bring further power efficiency over 10SF.
  14. Funny
    MageTank reacted to Master Disaster in Valve patches exploit that allowed free Steam Wallet funds   
    I half expected the report to start with..
     
    "Hello viewers, I'm the spiffing brit and today I'm going to tell Valve how I broke their wallet system to gain infinite money so sit back, make sure you're comfy and have a nice warm cup of Yorkshire tea ready"
  15. Funny
    MageTank got a reaction from Moonzy in NBMiner Partially Cracks Nvidia Anti-Mining Limiter, Restores 70% Performance on Ampere LHR GPUs   
    Don't mind me, I am just here for another round of "You're not using your hardware the way I want you to use it and that makes me mad".
     
    You are aware that the industry knew this silica shortage was coming since early 2019, right? We knew this would happen, regardless of mining, regardless of gaming, it was inevitable. What we didn't anticipate was a pandemic thrown on top of that, forcing more people to work from home, driving up demand while destroying production & logistic output in the middle of said shortage. If you honestly believe mining is the biggest cause of the shortage here, you are being narrow-minded.
     
    Even if all of the miners decided to become environmentalists overnight and donate their GPU's to starving gamers, they would not have enough GPU's to satiate the demand in the industry right now.
     
    Trust me, I need a GPU more than anyone right now. I am over here trying to survive with an RTX 2080 Ti that doesn't even have HDMI 2.1. I can't even run my 4K OLED TV at 120hz even though I really, really want to. I know none of you can possibly understand what it is like to be me right now, I endure this struggle because I can, because the world needs me to. I will endeavor to persevere...
     
     
  16. Funny
    MageTank got a reaction from thechinchinsong in The Penny drops: $611 Million in cryptocurrencies stolen   
    According to every bank heist movie ever, all of them?
     
    "I'm bypassing the mainframe, converting the IP to hexadecimal... IM IN"
  17. Funny
    MageTank got a reaction from GOTSpectrum in The Penny drops: $611 Million in cryptocurrencies stolen   
    According to every bank heist movie ever, all of them?
     
    "I'm bypassing the mainframe, converting the IP to hexadecimal... IM IN"
  18. Funny
    MageTank got a reaction from GDRRiley in The Penny drops: $611 Million in cryptocurrencies stolen   
    According to every bank heist movie ever, all of them?
     
    "I'm bypassing the mainframe, converting the IP to hexadecimal... IM IN"
  19. Funny
    MageTank got a reaction from Jtalk4456 in The Penny drops: $611 Million in cryptocurrencies stolen   
    According to every bank heist movie ever, all of them?
     
    "I'm bypassing the mainframe, converting the IP to hexadecimal... IM IN"
  20. Funny
    MageTank got a reaction from leadeater in The Penny drops: $611 Million in cryptocurrencies stolen   
    According to every bank heist movie ever, all of them?
     
    "I'm bypassing the mainframe, converting the IP to hexadecimal... IM IN"
  21. Funny
    MageTank got a reaction from Lurick in The Penny drops: $611 Million in cryptocurrencies stolen   
    According to every bank heist movie ever, all of them?
     
    "I'm bypassing the mainframe, converting the IP to hexadecimal... IM IN"
  22. Funny
    MageTank got a reaction from WolframaticAlpha in Apple is (going to) scan your Apple devices   
    Man, imagine you send a picture of your dongle to a significant other and Apple flags it as child abuse. Talk about destroying ones ego, lol.
     
    I get where people are coming from about the privacy concerns, but if this is being done entirely by a remote database that is entirely automated, isn't saving results that aren't abuse, and no human has access to it, I'd probably be fine with it personally.
     
    Those are some pretty big IF's...
     
    I am not entirely sure this is the point though. It would potentially stop minors that are being groomed to send pictures from these devices on various apps to people online if it's flagging what is taken and sent outbound. If it alerts the children's parents, that could allow them to intervene before further harm takes place. I don't envy parents having to take care of their kids in a digital world, sounds like an utter nightmare honestly.
     
    That said, I do agree with your cynicism about Apple's potential for false altruism here. It seems odd to me that they take a hard stance in the past of "We refuse to give the FBI access to our devices, even for criminal investigations!" to "We totally want to stop crimes and stuff, but we really have to scan your device to do it. We care about stopping crime you guys, we are super serious about it". I guess Apple is only fine going all-in in this context as long as they hold the winning hand at all times?
  23. Funny
    MageTank got a reaction from Jtalk4456 in Apple is (going to) scan your Apple devices   
    Man, imagine you send a picture of your dongle to a significant other and Apple flags it as child abuse. Talk about destroying ones ego, lol.
     
    I get where people are coming from about the privacy concerns, but if this is being done entirely by a remote database that is entirely automated, isn't saving results that aren't abuse, and no human has access to it, I'd probably be fine with it personally.
     
    Those are some pretty big IF's...
     
    I am not entirely sure this is the point though. It would potentially stop minors that are being groomed to send pictures from these devices on various apps to people online if it's flagging what is taken and sent outbound. If it alerts the children's parents, that could allow them to intervene before further harm takes place. I don't envy parents having to take care of their kids in a digital world, sounds like an utter nightmare honestly.
     
    That said, I do agree with your cynicism about Apple's potential for false altruism here. It seems odd to me that they take a hard stance in the past of "We refuse to give the FBI access to our devices, even for criminal investigations!" to "We totally want to stop crimes and stuff, but we really have to scan your device to do it. We care about stopping crime you guys, we are super serious about it". I guess Apple is only fine going all-in in this context as long as they hold the winning hand at all times?
  24. Funny
    MageTank got a reaction from IkeaGnome in Apple is (going to) scan your Apple devices   
    Man, imagine you send a picture of your dongle to a significant other and Apple flags it as child abuse. Talk about destroying ones ego, lol.
     
    I get where people are coming from about the privacy concerns, but if this is being done entirely by a remote database that is entirely automated, isn't saving results that aren't abuse, and no human has access to it, I'd probably be fine with it personally.
     
    Those are some pretty big IF's...
     
    I am not entirely sure this is the point though. It would potentially stop minors that are being groomed to send pictures from these devices on various apps to people online if it's flagging what is taken and sent outbound. If it alerts the children's parents, that could allow them to intervene before further harm takes place. I don't envy parents having to take care of their kids in a digital world, sounds like an utter nightmare honestly.
     
    That said, I do agree with your cynicism about Apple's potential for false altruism here. It seems odd to me that they take a hard stance in the past of "We refuse to give the FBI access to our devices, even for criminal investigations!" to "We totally want to stop crimes and stuff, but we really have to scan your device to do it. We care about stopping crime you guys, we are super serious about it". I guess Apple is only fine going all-in in this context as long as they hold the winning hand at all times?
  25. Funny
    MageTank got a reaction from Dutch_Master in (PSA) A warning to YouTube creators, scammers have worked out an almost fool proof method of phishing your account   
    You and me both, brother. How I am still employed is a miracle, but at least I am scam-proof?
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