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Sakkura

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  1. Like
    Sakkura got a reaction from Gorilla Warfare in Understanding PSU protections   
    This protection applies to the PSU output, which is DC. As such, impedance isn't really involved.
     
    12V rails were originally not supposed to allow more than 20A (240W assuming nominal voltage) per the ATX12V 2.0 specification, but as power demands escalated everyone just started ignoring that part of the specification. It was dropped in later versions.
  2. Informative
    Sakkura reacted to jonnyGURU in Understanding PSU protections   
    You have to take into consideration the resistance, not just of the short itself, but what is added by the circuit itself.
     
    When I see SCP working is when there is a direct short between an output and ground.  When I see SCP NOT work, but OCP work instead (if it's there), is when the short is on the far end of a connection, like on the PCB of a failed hard drive or a failed graphics card, etc. where the short is on the device itself.  The device itself typically doesn't have SCP (it might on it's own D2D circuit, but what if the short is before that even?), so the PSU keeps feeding power to the short because it doesn't see it as a short, it sees it as a load.
     
    That's how you can know if your PC catching fire was due to the PSU or not.  Are the melted connector on the PSU or are they on the device?  If they're on the device side, that means the device failed and the PSU kept feeding power to it until the connector melted, insulation melted off the wires and this forced a short between a hot and ground (unless the PSU has multiple +12V rails with lower OCP, at which case things would never get so far).
     
    And OPP DEFINITELY does not replace OCP or SCP.  Since OPP is on the primary side, you have to take into account the energy stored in all of the components of the PSU before OPP can trip.  This is why some PSUs work better with the Ampere cards than others.  If you have a lot of capacitance storing power, then the graphics card can feed off of that for the transient loads, keeping OCP and OPP completely oblivious to the load. But if the caps drain too quickly, that spike in power hits the OCP or OPP (depending on which see it first).
     
    It's very similar to how a stiffener caps work in car audio.  Except the headlights dimming is your OCP or OPP tripping: https://www.crutchfield.com/S-bhH42VRD5iX/learn/car-what-is-a-capacitor-faq.html
     
  3. Informative
    Sakkura reacted to jonnyGURU in Understanding PSU protections   
    It's never made sense.  In DC circuits, VA is W.
     
    But Intel has always used VA in the spec.
     
  4. Informative
    Sakkura got a reaction from Moonzy in Understanding PSU protections   
    This protection applies to the PSU output, which is DC. As such, impedance isn't really involved.
     
    12V rails were originally not supposed to allow more than 20A (240W assuming nominal voltage) per the ATX12V 2.0 specification, but as power demands escalated everyone just started ignoring that part of the specification. It was dropped in later versions.
  5. Funny
    Sakkura got a reaction from Mark Kaine in Why won't anyone test VRR on Ampere cards?   
    The TVs are too big for most of us.
  6. Agree
    Sakkura reacted to Thaldor in EU "Right to Repair" legislation to go into force from March   
    IIRC this is meant to be same kind of thing as EU energy label stickers with grading from D (worst) to A++++ (god-like) which tell the consumer how good the product is on that meter. Companies can make D-grade garbage and cut the costs to the minimum but good luck getting sales when even stores don't want to stock D-grade garbage because that sticker looks ugly when the next product has A. Those are also completely made by the manufacturers as in there isn't any extra costs evaluating their product if they can do it in-house and basicly they can just slap that sticker in and everything is ok (you can even print your own stickers with EU provided sticker maker), but there is random tests done by all customs officials and national quality assurance officials in every EU country and if you lied on the sticker, you will be in the next chapter of "how EU fines companies" series (quick summary: 10-50% of the revenue, nope, not the profits because those can be played around, the revenue, so even bigger companies really feel EU fines).
    So, if company's product fulfills all the mentioned things to be really customer serviceable and repairable, it can slap that A-grade sticker to it and to the shelf it goes. But if the product doesn't fulfill all the things they can slap some lower grade sticker and to the shelf it goes.
     
    And there's so much innovation that companies change screws to much more better and more developed ones every century.
    In information technology things really go like a rocket forward but everywhere else, not that fast. Your coffeemaker is most likely extremely similar to the one from couple decades ago, Moccamaster and it probably is identical to the one from the 70's with very few modifications, biggest difference is probably that added clock that costs "100+something" in the coffeemaker and does "so innovative things" like has a timer switch that costed 10 cents to develop and add to the design. Mostly "the big changes" are stuff like added one plastic peg and moved others so the new parts can't fit the old machine and the customer cannot just go and scavenge that drip-lock from older/newer model but needs to either pay a ton to get replacement or just buy a whole new machine (from which still the comany makes profits even if it's a lot cheaper than the replacement part). Even worse if we talk about even more mundane things like fridge handles, like does every fridge need "innovative and modern" new handle made especially for that single model that is just one out of tens yearly released by the same company? Or would it actually be a lot smarter to make one handle extremely well and use it through all of the companys fridges through several years (it's not very likely someone comes out with so new and fabulous innovations concerning handles that you would need to have a new one in every model).
    And yeah, engines, pumps and so on and on do develop over time but even then we talk years of using around the same pump with minimal changes (mostly enough that it doesn't fit the old machine -minimal). Not to even go to buttons and other small bits and pieces that have remained unchanged decades because there really isn't any reason to try to change them. Like seriously, the reason why the brand new coffee maker costs less than the replacement pot, is because the company is being a cheap piece of shit and it really don't want you to replace that pot but buy a new one because then they don't have to have any kind of repair/replacement infrastructure and especially, they don't want you to go and dig around from some garbage pile newer or older used pot.
  7. Agree
    Sakkura got a reaction from linuxChips2600 in Should I do a clean install of Windows, changing from intel to Ryzen?   
    Basic files on other drives would be unaffected. Installed programs (including games) would no longer work. But with Steam, for example, it can "discover" those pre-existing files when installing the game, so it won't have to redownload everything.
  8. Agree
    Sakkura got a reaction from cm992 in Should I do a clean install of Windows, changing from intel to Ryzen?   
    Basic files on other drives would be unaffected. Installed programs (including games) would no longer work. But with Steam, for example, it can "discover" those pre-existing files when installing the game, so it won't have to redownload everything.
  9. Agree
    Sakkura got a reaction from jaslion in Why doesnt AMD and Nvidia make cards at GloFlow, SMIC or others at 14nm?   
    The Vega 10 GPU used in the RX Vega cards had 12.5 billion transistors.
     
    The Navi 21 GPU used in the RX 6000 cards has 26.8 billion transistors.
     
    Manufacturing that at 14nm would not be feasible. Way too expensive, way too power-hungry, and even the yields wouldn't be good since the chip would be enormous. Over a thousand mm2 in theory.
  10. Agree
    Sakkura got a reaction from Eigenvektor in Why doesnt AMD and Nvidia make cards at GloFlow, SMIC or others at 14nm?   
    The Vega 10 GPU used in the RX Vega cards had 12.5 billion transistors.
     
    The Navi 21 GPU used in the RX 6000 cards has 26.8 billion transistors.
     
    Manufacturing that at 14nm would not be feasible. Way too expensive, way too power-hungry, and even the yields wouldn't be good since the chip would be enormous. Over a thousand mm2 in theory.
  11. Agree
    Sakkura got a reaction from Vishera in Why doesnt AMD and Nvidia make cards at GloFlow, SMIC or others at 14nm?   
    The Vega 10 GPU used in the RX Vega cards had 12.5 billion transistors.
     
    The Navi 21 GPU used in the RX 6000 cards has 26.8 billion transistors.
     
    Manufacturing that at 14nm would not be feasible. Way too expensive, way too power-hungry, and even the yields wouldn't be good since the chip would be enormous. Over a thousand mm2 in theory.
  12. Like
    Sakkura got a reaction from Godlygamer23 in Is GPU Bottleneck necessarily bad?   
    No, something will always be the bottleneck. Most often the GPU.
     
    It's just a matter of how badly it's holding back the rest of the system. If you have like a Ryzen 9 5950X and it's being bottlenecked by a GTX 750 Ti, yeah that's bad. But if it's an RTX 3080 then whatever, it's fine even if it's technically the GPU bottlenecking in most games.
  13. Like
    Sakkura got a reaction from treeroy in Is there anything wrong with cheap motherboards?   
    One SATA Express port consists of two SATA ports plus a little extra port next to them.
     
    So yeah, B450 supports more than 2 SATA drives. Also bear in mind these figures are just what the chipset itself can offer, it is possible for a manufacturer to add more ports with extra controllers (but uncommon with budget boards).
  14. Agree
    Sakkura got a reaction from themctipers in RAM DDR speed not increasing despite XMP enabled   
    Task manager isn't always accurate. Try checking the memory frequency with CPU-Z - it should be 1467 MHz (equivalent to 2933 MT/s).
  15. Like
    Sakkura got a reaction from Filingo in Will a new PCIe Wi-Fi card work on PCI x1 2.0?   
    PCIe 2.0 x1 provides 500 MB/s of usable bandwidth.
     
    The WiFi card advertises 3000 Mbps which is equivalent to 375 MB/s. So it should be okay.
  16. Agree
    Sakkura reacted to _Sir in UPS delays delivering Newegg packages, among others due to shipping limits   
    I'm blaming Newegg for the lack of communication. This isn't something that we should be learning from the news and news only. The only thing on Newegg's website is the default holiday warning saying that stuff may be delayed a couple days and to order by X date to get it before Y date. There's absolutely zero caution that your items may be delayed by weeks. This is something that Newegg needs to communicate forward to its customers, particularly those with packages waiting to be picked up or for people who are still making purchases not knowing about this whole fiasco.

    Newegg isn't just some small retailer either. Their distribution centers will have multiple scheduled pickups each day. They wouldn't last more than a few hours before someone goes "Hey, UPS hasn't picked up yet..." before things start piling up around their dock. The fact we're days into this fiasco with no communication from Newegg treating this like everything is situation normal is pretty piss poor in making sure all parties involved is aware. Yes, like I said, UPS is at fault, but it's Newegg's job to let their customers know in a timely manner.
  17. Agree
    Sakkura got a reaction from thechinchinsong in EU Parliament votes for standardized repairability ratings on electronic devices   
    Great news. Of course the first version of this will probably have some flaws, but it's important to get started on making repairability a priority. 
  18. Informative
    Sakkura got a reaction from Bananasplit_00 in EU Parliament votes for standardized repairability ratings on electronic devices   
    The latter. 
     
     
  19. Agree
    Sakkura got a reaction from Beskamir in EU Parliament votes for standardized repairability ratings on electronic devices   
    Great news. Of course the first version of this will probably have some flaws, but it's important to get started on making repairability a priority. 
  20. Agree
    Sakkura got a reaction from DoctorNick in EU Parliament votes for standardized repairability ratings on electronic devices   
    Great news. Of course the first version of this will probably have some flaws, but it's important to get started on making repairability a priority. 
  21. Agree
    Sakkura got a reaction from AluminiumTech in EU Parliament votes for standardized repairability ratings on electronic devices   
    Great news. Of course the first version of this will probably have some flaws, but it's important to get started on making repairability a priority. 
  22. Agree
    Sakkura got a reaction from Mihle in EU Parliament votes for standardized repairability ratings on electronic devices   
    Great news. Of course the first version of this will probably have some flaws, but it's important to get started on making repairability a priority. 
  23. Agree
    Sakkura got a reaction from Ashley xD in EU Parliament votes for standardized repairability ratings on electronic devices   
    Great news. Of course the first version of this will probably have some flaws, but it's important to get started on making repairability a priority. 
  24. Informative
    Sakkura reacted to Luxzio22 in EU Parliament votes for standardized repairability ratings on electronic devices   
    The vote calls for the EU Commission to “develop and introduce mandatory labelling, to provide clear, immediately visible and easy-to-understand information to consumers on the estimated lifetime and repairability of a product at the time of purchase.”
     
    Quotes
     
    My thoughts
     So the EU has decided to make it mandatory for devices to have a repairability rating, in a way similar to efficiency ratings for PSUs. Hope this really encourages manufacturers selling inside and outside the EU to take repairability seriously and makes them understand that they can't just sell old components as a new ''Product'' and get away with it. If nothing else, it will make both the manufacturers and the consumers realize the nature of the things they're selling / buying and make them question what they really claim and want in terms of longevity and long term usability. I don't know the implications of this on software-based obsolescence but I'm hoping that the law is eventually amended to cover future software support as well. 
     
    Sources
    https://www.ifixit.com/News/47111/european-parliament-votes-for-right-to-repair
    https://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/en/press-room/20201120IPR92118/
     
    EDIT: another source added
  25. Agree
    Sakkura got a reaction from SpaceGhostC2C in EU Parliament votes for standardized repairability ratings on electronic devices   
    Great news. Of course the first version of this will probably have some flaws, but it's important to get started on making repairability a priority. 
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