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Ninbura

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  1. Like
    Ninbura got a reaction from igormp in I think Linus would be better off using FFmpeg for his 6 cam Badminton streaming / recording   
    The amount of chips makes a big difference though, not saying you weren't accounting for that but just pointing it out. I remember switching from my GTX 1080 to a GTX 1050 because I kept hearing everyone say "there's no difference" only to find that my typical FFmpeg command was overloading the encoder in the GTX 1050 when my GTX 1080 had 50% headroom. Essentially each chip of the same architecture can pull the same weight, so a GTX 1080 has 100% more bandwidth than the GTX 1050 and the GP100 has 200% more bandwidth when compared to the GTX 1050. Additionally while the Nvidia encode matrix states that the 1070 has 2 NVENC chips, only one of them is activated (at least in my experience), and the patch wasn't able to activate the second one, once again at least in my experience.
     
    Not sure why this is the case, but the encoder doesn't care what framerate you're doing the encode at, just the resolution. When I say "it doesn't care" I mean within reason, or within the specified spec. What I mean to say is if you do a 4K30 encode it uses the same bandwidth as a 4K60 encode, in-regards to the NVENC encoder at least, obviously a higher framerate encode will further stress the system elsewhere. The Turing GPUs do have the added benefit of a higher quality output, but they also suffer from a major loss in bandwidth when compared to a GTX 1080 (half as much) and especially when compared to GP100 (1/3 the bandwidth). Though, this probably wouldn't matter in Linus's case as I believe the end result was 6 1080p encodes, which the Turing architecture could handle. Unless he kept using OBS, in-which case he would be doing 12 1080p encodes, as OBS has to do a separate encode for the recording and stream.

    Bottom line, if he switched to FFmpeg he could get away with using a single 1650 super (which uses 7th gen NVENC) to handle all 6 1080p encodes, with the added benefit of the increase quality which the Turing NVENC encoder offers.

    Edit: Just want to clarify that the Turing NVENC encoding chips don't suffer a loss in bandwidth when compared 1:1 to a Pascal NVENC encoding chip, but rather there are just no GPUs with more than 1 Turing NVENC chip like there are GPUs with multiple Pascal encoding chips (i.e. GTX 1080, GP100).
  2. Informative
    Ninbura got a reaction from AbydosOne in I think Linus would be better off using FFmpeg for his 6 cam Badminton streaming / recording   
    Typically there is a topic posted for every video in the “LTT Official” portion of the forum, but for this video specifically there was never a post / discussion thread created… Not sure if this was by design because they didn’t want everyone and their mom telling them how they think they could do it better, or if they just forgot to make a thread for it. Assuming it’s the latter, I’m really not sure where else to put this.
     
    Love the video, never seen anyone try to capture more than 3 4k sources on one PC. I understand that you already have a working solution and probably don’t want to change it, but here’s a few things I thought of while watching the video:
    You can bypass Nvidia’s artificial encode limit via this patch, not sure if that’s against your guys’ partnership with them or something but it’s super easy to apply and works perfectly. You can avoid high 3D GPU usage by using FFmpeg to stream and record instead of OBS. Additionally, you would only need that first Quadro with this method as the GP100 is perfectly capable of encoding 6 streams of 1080p (along with basically any other Nvidia card released in the last 5 years assuming you're using the patch), which seemed to be your final output resolution despite the 4K cameras. 
      Using my patched GTX 1080 I am capable of encoding up to 4 streams of 4K60 using FFmpeg, and the GP100 has 3 NVENC encoding chips while the GTX 1080 has 2 (same architecture). Thus, in theory the GP100 could do 6 encodes of 4K60 by itself, which would be cool to see. Though at that point your limitation is more likely to be your CPU, or even software which starts to hiccup as multiple instances of recordings inadvertently hit the same threads and such.
     
    I would suggest giving FFmpeg a try with a command / parameters like this:
    -thread_queue_size 9999 -indexmem 9999  -f dshow  -rtbufsize 2147.48M  -video_size 1920x1080  -framerate 60 -i video=”[video device]”:audio=”[audio device]”  -map 0  -c:v h264_nvenc  -preset: hp  -r 60  -rc-lookahead 120  -pix_fmt nv12  -b:v 6M -b:v 6M  -minrate 6M -maxrate 6M  -bufsize 6M  -c:a aac  -ar 44100  -b:a 320k  -vsync 1  -max_muxing_queue_size 9999  -f mpegts  C:\Users\[user]\Videos\FFmpeg\Output.ts
    You can also use the tee psuedo-muxer in FFmpeg to send the same encode to 2 places, like a stream to Twitch and a local file. What makes this particularly convenient is that you don’t have to do the same encode work twice like you have to in OBS:
    -f tee  "[f=mpegts]C:\Users\[user]\Videos\FFmpeg\Output.ts|[f=mpegts]udp://10.0.1.255:1234/"
    Lastly if desired FFmpeg also has a segment muxer, which would allow you to record 24/7 without over-filling your hard drives, the recording will automatically overwrite the first part when it hits the maximum part you specified:
    -f segment  -segment_time 1800  -segment_wrap 48  -reset_timestamps 1 -segment_format_options max_delay=0  C:\Users\[user]\Videos\FFmpeg\Output%02d.ts
    You can even combine the tee and segment logic to stream / record 24/7 without every overfilling the drives:
    -f tee  "[f=segment:segment_time=1800:segment_wrap=48:reset_timestamps=1:segment_format_options=max_delay=0]C:\Users\[user]\Videos\Output%02d.ts|[f=mpegts]udp://10.0.1.255:1234/"
    Since FFmpeg is run in the console you can call these 6 encodes programmatically in something like Powershell using Start-Process, allowing you to easily launch everything from one place. I’ve attached a zip containing the file structure for doing something like this.
     
    Linus Example.zip
  3. Like
    Ninbura got a reaction from Downkey in I think Linus would be better off using FFmpeg for his 6 cam Badminton streaming / recording   
    Typically there is a topic posted for every video in the “LTT Official” portion of the forum, but for this video specifically there was never a post / discussion thread created… Not sure if this was by design because they didn’t want everyone and their mom telling them how they think they could do it better, or if they just forgot to make a thread for it. Assuming it’s the latter, I’m really not sure where else to put this.
     
    Love the video, never seen anyone try to capture more than 3 4k sources on one PC. I understand that you already have a working solution and probably don’t want to change it, but here’s a few things I thought of while watching the video:
    You can bypass Nvidia’s artificial encode limit via this patch, not sure if that’s against your guys’ partnership with them or something but it’s super easy to apply and works perfectly. You can avoid high 3D GPU usage by using FFmpeg to stream and record instead of OBS. Additionally, you would only need that first Quadro with this method as the GP100 is perfectly capable of encoding 6 streams of 1080p (along with basically any other Nvidia card released in the last 5 years assuming you're using the patch), which seemed to be your final output resolution despite the 4K cameras. 
      Using my patched GTX 1080 I am capable of encoding up to 4 streams of 4K60 using FFmpeg, and the GP100 has 3 NVENC encoding chips while the GTX 1080 has 2 (same architecture). Thus, in theory the GP100 could do 6 encodes of 4K60 by itself, which would be cool to see. Though at that point your limitation is more likely to be your CPU, or even software which starts to hiccup as multiple instances of recordings inadvertently hit the same threads and such.
     
    I would suggest giving FFmpeg a try with a command / parameters like this:
    -thread_queue_size 9999 -indexmem 9999  -f dshow  -rtbufsize 2147.48M  -video_size 1920x1080  -framerate 60 -i video=”[video device]”:audio=”[audio device]”  -map 0  -c:v h264_nvenc  -preset: hp  -r 60  -rc-lookahead 120  -pix_fmt nv12  -b:v 6M -b:v 6M  -minrate 6M -maxrate 6M  -bufsize 6M  -c:a aac  -ar 44100  -b:a 320k  -vsync 1  -max_muxing_queue_size 9999  -f mpegts  C:\Users\[user]\Videos\FFmpeg\Output.ts
    You can also use the tee psuedo-muxer in FFmpeg to send the same encode to 2 places, like a stream to Twitch and a local file. What makes this particularly convenient is that you don’t have to do the same encode work twice like you have to in OBS:
    -f tee  "[f=mpegts]C:\Users\[user]\Videos\FFmpeg\Output.ts|[f=mpegts]udp://10.0.1.255:1234/"
    Lastly if desired FFmpeg also has a segment muxer, which would allow you to record 24/7 without over-filling your hard drives, the recording will automatically overwrite the first part when it hits the maximum part you specified:
    -f segment  -segment_time 1800  -segment_wrap 48  -reset_timestamps 1 -segment_format_options max_delay=0  C:\Users\[user]\Videos\FFmpeg\Output%02d.ts
    You can even combine the tee and segment logic to stream / record 24/7 without every overfilling the drives:
    -f tee  "[f=segment:segment_time=1800:segment_wrap=48:reset_timestamps=1:segment_format_options=max_delay=0]C:\Users\[user]\Videos\Output%02d.ts|[f=mpegts]udp://10.0.1.255:1234/"
    Since FFmpeg is run in the console you can call these 6 encodes programmatically in something like Powershell using Start-Process, allowing you to easily launch everything from one place. I’ve attached a zip containing the file structure for doing something like this.
     
    Linus Example.zip
  4. Like
    Ninbura got a reaction from TacticlTwinkie in I think Linus would be better off using FFmpeg for his 6 cam Badminton streaming / recording   
    Typically there is a topic posted for every video in the “LTT Official” portion of the forum, but for this video specifically there was never a post / discussion thread created… Not sure if this was by design because they didn’t want everyone and their mom telling them how they think they could do it better, or if they just forgot to make a thread for it. Assuming it’s the latter, I’m really not sure where else to put this.
     
    Love the video, never seen anyone try to capture more than 3 4k sources on one PC. I understand that you already have a working solution and probably don’t want to change it, but here’s a few things I thought of while watching the video:
    You can bypass Nvidia’s artificial encode limit via this patch, not sure if that’s against your guys’ partnership with them or something but it’s super easy to apply and works perfectly. You can avoid high 3D GPU usage by using FFmpeg to stream and record instead of OBS. Additionally, you would only need that first Quadro with this method as the GP100 is perfectly capable of encoding 6 streams of 1080p (along with basically any other Nvidia card released in the last 5 years assuming you're using the patch), which seemed to be your final output resolution despite the 4K cameras. 
      Using my patched GTX 1080 I am capable of encoding up to 4 streams of 4K60 using FFmpeg, and the GP100 has 3 NVENC encoding chips while the GTX 1080 has 2 (same architecture). Thus, in theory the GP100 could do 6 encodes of 4K60 by itself, which would be cool to see. Though at that point your limitation is more likely to be your CPU, or even software which starts to hiccup as multiple instances of recordings inadvertently hit the same threads and such.
     
    I would suggest giving FFmpeg a try with a command / parameters like this:
    -thread_queue_size 9999 -indexmem 9999  -f dshow  -rtbufsize 2147.48M  -video_size 1920x1080  -framerate 60 -i video=”[video device]”:audio=”[audio device]”  -map 0  -c:v h264_nvenc  -preset: hp  -r 60  -rc-lookahead 120  -pix_fmt nv12  -b:v 6M -b:v 6M  -minrate 6M -maxrate 6M  -bufsize 6M  -c:a aac  -ar 44100  -b:a 320k  -vsync 1  -max_muxing_queue_size 9999  -f mpegts  C:\Users\[user]\Videos\FFmpeg\Output.ts
    You can also use the tee psuedo-muxer in FFmpeg to send the same encode to 2 places, like a stream to Twitch and a local file. What makes this particularly convenient is that you don’t have to do the same encode work twice like you have to in OBS:
    -f tee  "[f=mpegts]C:\Users\[user]\Videos\FFmpeg\Output.ts|[f=mpegts]udp://10.0.1.255:1234/"
    Lastly if desired FFmpeg also has a segment muxer, which would allow you to record 24/7 without over-filling your hard drives, the recording will automatically overwrite the first part when it hits the maximum part you specified:
    -f segment  -segment_time 1800  -segment_wrap 48  -reset_timestamps 1 -segment_format_options max_delay=0  C:\Users\[user]\Videos\FFmpeg\Output%02d.ts
    You can even combine the tee and segment logic to stream / record 24/7 without every overfilling the drives:
    -f tee  "[f=segment:segment_time=1800:segment_wrap=48:reset_timestamps=1:segment_format_options=max_delay=0]C:\Users\[user]\Videos\Output%02d.ts|[f=mpegts]udp://10.0.1.255:1234/"
    Since FFmpeg is run in the console you can call these 6 encodes programmatically in something like Powershell using Start-Process, allowing you to easily launch everything from one place. I’ve attached a zip containing the file structure for doing something like this.
     
    Linus Example.zip
  5. Like
    Ninbura got a reaction from kelvinhall05 in I think Linus would be better off using FFmpeg for his 6 cam Badminton streaming / recording   
    Typically there is a topic posted for every video in the “LTT Official” portion of the forum, but for this video specifically there was never a post / discussion thread created… Not sure if this was by design because they didn’t want everyone and their mom telling them how they think they could do it better, or if they just forgot to make a thread for it. Assuming it’s the latter, I’m really not sure where else to put this.
     
    Love the video, never seen anyone try to capture more than 3 4k sources on one PC. I understand that you already have a working solution and probably don’t want to change it, but here’s a few things I thought of while watching the video:
    You can bypass Nvidia’s artificial encode limit via this patch, not sure if that’s against your guys’ partnership with them or something but it’s super easy to apply and works perfectly. You can avoid high 3D GPU usage by using FFmpeg to stream and record instead of OBS. Additionally, you would only need that first Quadro with this method as the GP100 is perfectly capable of encoding 6 streams of 1080p (along with basically any other Nvidia card released in the last 5 years assuming you're using the patch), which seemed to be your final output resolution despite the 4K cameras. 
      Using my patched GTX 1080 I am capable of encoding up to 4 streams of 4K60 using FFmpeg, and the GP100 has 3 NVENC encoding chips while the GTX 1080 has 2 (same architecture). Thus, in theory the GP100 could do 6 encodes of 4K60 by itself, which would be cool to see. Though at that point your limitation is more likely to be your CPU, or even software which starts to hiccup as multiple instances of recordings inadvertently hit the same threads and such.
     
    I would suggest giving FFmpeg a try with a command / parameters like this:
    -thread_queue_size 9999 -indexmem 9999  -f dshow  -rtbufsize 2147.48M  -video_size 1920x1080  -framerate 60 -i video=”[video device]”:audio=”[audio device]”  -map 0  -c:v h264_nvenc  -preset: hp  -r 60  -rc-lookahead 120  -pix_fmt nv12  -b:v 6M -b:v 6M  -minrate 6M -maxrate 6M  -bufsize 6M  -c:a aac  -ar 44100  -b:a 320k  -vsync 1  -max_muxing_queue_size 9999  -f mpegts  C:\Users\[user]\Videos\FFmpeg\Output.ts
    You can also use the tee psuedo-muxer in FFmpeg to send the same encode to 2 places, like a stream to Twitch and a local file. What makes this particularly convenient is that you don’t have to do the same encode work twice like you have to in OBS:
    -f tee  "[f=mpegts]C:\Users\[user]\Videos\FFmpeg\Output.ts|[f=mpegts]udp://10.0.1.255:1234/"
    Lastly if desired FFmpeg also has a segment muxer, which would allow you to record 24/7 without over-filling your hard drives, the recording will automatically overwrite the first part when it hits the maximum part you specified:
    -f segment  -segment_time 1800  -segment_wrap 48  -reset_timestamps 1 -segment_format_options max_delay=0  C:\Users\[user]\Videos\FFmpeg\Output%02d.ts
    You can even combine the tee and segment logic to stream / record 24/7 without every overfilling the drives:
    -f tee  "[f=segment:segment_time=1800:segment_wrap=48:reset_timestamps=1:segment_format_options=max_delay=0]C:\Users\[user]\Videos\Output%02d.ts|[f=mpegts]udp://10.0.1.255:1234/"
    Since FFmpeg is run in the console you can call these 6 encodes programmatically in something like Powershell using Start-Process, allowing you to easily launch everything from one place. I’ve attached a zip containing the file structure for doing something like this.
     
    Linus Example.zip
  6. Like
    Ninbura got a reaction from LinusTech in Quadro GPU for OBS Stream?   
    Quadros also have the ability to encode / decode unlimited output video streams while Geforce cards are limited to two, additionally higher end Quadros have additional NVENC chips allowing for more bandwidth.

    For example when talking bandwidth (live encoding without dropping frames):
    Geforce GTX 1050 (1 NVENC Chip) - can encode 1x4K60 output
    Geforce GTX 1080 (2 NVENC Chips) - can encode 2x4K60 outputs
    Quadro GP100 (3 NVENC Chips) - can encode 4x4K60 outputs

    Or when talking about session limits, Quadros have none, very useful for lower resolution outputs like 1080p60 (live encoding without dropping frames):
    Geforce GTX 1050 (1 NVENC Chip) - can encode 2x1080p60 outputs
    Geforce GTX 1080 (2 NVENC Chips) - can encode 2x1080p60 outputs
    Quadro GP100 (3 NVENC Chips) - can encode around 16x1080p60 outputs
    Quadro P2000 (1 NVENC Chip) - can encode around 5x1080p60 outputs

    While both the GTX 1050 & 1080 have the headroom or encoding bandwidth to encode 5-7 1080p60 stream simultaneously they can only encode 2 due to artificially imposed session limits. I included the P2000 in this use case as it still gives you the ability to encode more than 2 streams if needed at under $300, while the GP100 costs $4000+.
     
    There is a common misconception that when encoding with like generation cards there is no difference but this is not true, as demonstrated above the GTX 1080 actually has twice the encoding bandwidth as the GTX 1050. Meaning if you were streaming to Youtube at 4K60 and wanted to concurrently local record at 4K60 the GTX 1080 could handle it while the GTX 1050 could not, streaming while local recording is a very common use case.

    Streaming while local recording also gives Quadros (even at lower resolutions) an interesting use case while using OBS in conjunction with NDI. For example if you wanted to stream to Twitch and wanted to record both your camera and gameplay as separate local files for nondestructive editing you could if you used a Quadro. This is because as mentioned earlier Quadros have no session limits, in this use case you're outputting 3 video streams (camera + gameplay combined, the camera, the gameplay) which exceeds the 2 stream limit on Geforce cards. This could be very useful for someone who wants to upload part of their streams to Youtube without losing quality when zooming in on the camera which many use for comedic effect. Seeing as the Quadro P2000 is less than $300 and has the capability to do so it's really not that impractical.

    Nvidia's Video Encode and Decode GPU Support Matrix - https://developer.nvidia.com/video-encode-decode-gpu-support-matrix
    Using NDI to record sources separately without overlays by Epos Vox - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pu5JFAIWH8Y
     
    Pascal based NVENC chips will get you about the same quality as CPU encoding at preset Very Fast. 

    So yes you could get better quality with CPU encoding but it will only be noticeable if you're willing to shell out $300+ for a CPU that can handle medium to low presets. Meanwhile you could pick up a GTX 1050 for around $100 for very decent and watchable quality.
  7. Like
    Ninbura got a reaction from PCForStreaming in GTX 1660Ti / 1660 VS GTX 1080 Encoding Bandwidth   
    The GTX 1080 has 2 pascal NVENC chips so it has more bandwidth, the 1650 has a newer Turing NVENC chip so it has better quality.

    I encode 3x4k60 streams with my GTX 1080 in real-time, there is no resolution bottleneck with the GTX 1080 (unless you're doing over 8k60 in one stream), him not being able to stream 1080p with the GTX 1080 doesn't make any sense. That being said like I mentioned earlier, the 1650 has a Turing NVENC chip which has better quality, just worse bandwidth.

    For 99.99% of people the 1650 Super will make more sense since it's cheaper and produces a higher quality encode, and there really aren't many looking to encode over 4k60 which would overload its available bandwidth.
  8. Like
    Ninbura got a reaction from inund8 in I’ve been water cooling wrong for YEARS - $H!T Manufacturers Say   
    Having a hard time understanding the true purpose of this video.

    Corsair reached out saying that directly stacking radiators results in "negligible to no improvement" and then LTT proceeded to test a completely normal radiator setup in which there is plenty of space / free flowing air in-between radiators. At the end of video, Linus mentions they ended up actually testing the scenario in question off camera by removing one of the stacked radiators in the Minecraft server to find that temperatures increased by 5c, which I'd think would considered a "negligible" difference when taking in account that said radiator was 60 millimeters thick with a 320 millimeter foot print.

    There is an obvious bottleneck there when stacking those radiators directly which resulted in very little improvement, would be cool to see a video actually testing the scenario in question.
  9. Agree
    Ninbura got a reaction from Egad in I’ve been water cooling wrong for YEARS - $H!T Manufacturers Say   
    Having a hard time understanding the true purpose of this video.

    Corsair reached out saying that directly stacking radiators results in "negligible to no improvement" and then LTT proceeded to test a completely normal radiator setup in which there is plenty of space / free flowing air in-between radiators. At the end of video, Linus mentions they ended up actually testing the scenario in question off camera by removing one of the stacked radiators in the Minecraft server to find that temperatures increased by 5c, which I'd think would considered a "negligible" difference when taking in account that said radiator was 60 millimeters thick with a 320 millimeter foot print.

    There is an obvious bottleneck there when stacking those radiators directly which resulted in very little improvement, would be cool to see a video actually testing the scenario in question.
  10. Like
    Ninbura got a reaction from berkut in I’ve been water cooling wrong for YEARS - $H!T Manufacturers Say   
    Having a hard time understanding the true purpose of this video.

    Corsair reached out saying that directly stacking radiators results in "negligible to no improvement" and then LTT proceeded to test a completely normal radiator setup in which there is plenty of space / free flowing air in-between radiators. At the end of video, Linus mentions they ended up actually testing the scenario in question off camera by removing one of the stacked radiators in the Minecraft server to find that temperatures increased by 5c, which I'd think would considered a "negligible" difference when taking in account that said radiator was 60 millimeters thick with a 320 millimeter foot print.

    There is an obvious bottleneck there when stacking those radiators directly which resulted in very little improvement, would be cool to see a video actually testing the scenario in question.
  11. Agree
    Ninbura reacted to Dravinian in I’ve been water cooling wrong for YEARS - $H!T Manufacturers Say   
    I would like to see a better video of this.
     
    This one seemed, 1, extremely short, 2, not very scientific, and 3, limited to a scenario which was entirely different to the one that corsair highlited as being an issue.

    I would like to see a recreation of the actual case builds that corsair highlighted as being a problem and then a proper gamult of testing to see whether there is actually any difference, with perhaps some variations thrown in.
     
    My summation is: good idea for a video, given current situation, probably wasn't in a position to fulfil the potential.
  12. Like
    Ninbura reacted to Enderman in Multiple output digital amp/dac   
    So I just found out that there is a beta driver for Focusrite Scarlett interfaces that allows you use to all the inputs and outputs from windows
     
    Just what you and I were looking for.
     
    Just fyi though, the outputs on most scarlett interfaces are balanced TRS, not just simple rca.
  13. Like
    Ninbura got a reaction from ShearMe in Dual PC Setup Sound Issues   
    I believe this should be deleted and sent to me as a private message.
  14. Like
    Ninbura reacted to Azp3ct in Dual PC Setup Sound Issues   
    @TheNimbleOne
     
    Ok so its, 5:30 in the Morning right now in Germany. I could not go to sleep before Officially pay my respect and say thank you from the Bottom of my Heart to this Guy!
    Not Only he took his private time, to help me Setup my Streaming Pc - He setup everything Guided me to every encounter there was, explained everything, how it works and why IN the most detailed way possible. He showed me what to buy, with pros an cons
     
    Because of him, my dual pc workes how it should be and my sound improved a lot ! Sir i was honored to recieve your help and consider you now as a friend ! I wish you the best in Life !
     
    Talk to you soon, greetings from Germany - Benjamin
     
     
  15. Like
    Ninbura got a reaction from Azp3ct in Dual PC Setup Sound Issues   
    No problem

    Once everything is plugged in, to send the mic channel to the FX Send output you’ll need to turn up the FX knob on the mic channel:


    You don’t want to turn this knob up too high as it could introduce noise and possible distortion / clipping. It would be advisable to turn it to level 6, where the fat arrow is, and then you can apply gain as needed from the stereo splitter. My guess is you’ll want the stereo splitter at around 50-60% also, but you won’t know until you have it running into your computers. Generally a good rule of thumb is to never turn an analogue gain knob up passed 85% as the upper end of an amp introduces noise, at least in my experience. Same thing goes for you Scarlett, try and keep the gain below 85% on the XLR input. Some higher end interfaces have clean gain up to 90% but I have yet to test an interface that has clean gain passed that.

    You’ll also want to make sure that in Windows on both PCs the input levels are turned all the way up in the sound control panel:

     
    Yes you’ll want that, basically a TRS cable can either carry a a stereo signal or a balanced mono signal. Balanced just means noise retardant, a balanced connection uses the right channel as ground instead of sending a normal audio signal. So what you’re doing with that cable and adapter is you’re sending a balanced mono signal (your mic) from the mixer to that adapter, which then converts that signal to a stereo signal by mapping the left channel to both the left and right connectors on the TRS end of the adapter. That being said, for a balanced cable to work “properly” the two components it’s connected to need to likewise feature a balanced connection. I don’t believe the MG10XU has balanced connectors, and I’m not sure the adapter does either. However, I’ve never experienced an issue when using a TRS or balanced 1/4 cable in an unbalanced environment. They typically cost the same amount of money in comparison to a TS to TS 1/4 cable, so I usually just advise that people buy TRS 1/4 cables. That being said, I don’t have experience with every mixer / device and every configuration, so if you run into some noise problems it could be worth your time to try a TS to TS 1/4 interconnect cable in place of the TRS one.

    It may not seem like it on the surface, but it’s important you get the exact cables I recommended, or at least ones advertised to have the same connectors with the same amount of rings. Else you could run into some issues where the channels aren’t mapped properly and you’re only getting a mic signal, or any other signal, in one ear. Or even a signal that undesirably discards stereo imaging while repeating the left or right signal in both ears.

    Update us when you've got it all setup!
  16. Like
    Ninbura got a reaction from Azp3ct in Dual PC Setup Sound Issues   
    I just realized the TRS to XLR cable I have in the diagram has a female XLR connector instead of a male ? 

    I never linked that cable either, but this is what you'd want to run from the splitter to your Scarlett:
    https://www.amazon.com/Cable-Matters-6-35mm-Inch-Male/dp/B00KO8VY80/ref=sr_1_11?keywords=1%2F4%2Btrs%2Bto%2Bxlr&qid=1583778068&sr=8-11&th=1

    Updated diagram:
     
  17. Like
    Ninbura got a reaction from Azp3ct in Dual PC Setup Sound Issues   
    This is what a diagram excluding consoles and using your dbx & Scarlett would look like:

  18. Like
    Ninbura got a reaction from Azp3ct in Dual PC Setup Sound Issues   
    This is possible, but I'd like you to note that you're simply using the Scarlett for simple input, you're using the GPU for audio out to the HDMI extractor and you won't be plugging your headphones into the Scarlett anymore. That's why I originally suggested you could just sell it, because your PC already has basic input, and you're using HMDI for output. Really just kind of a waste for a Scarlett TBH.
     
    Yes those cables are going to the powered stereo splitter, this will be used to duplicate your mic signal and send it to each respective PC. Yes you can use your Focusrite as explained above. I tried to build this diagram in a way that others could use it, as this question get's brought up a lot. If you have no consoles you can simply bypass the HDMI Switch, but you'll still need the audio extractor. You don't need speakers, once again, just a general use example.
  19. Like
    Ninbura got a reaction from ShearMe in Multiple output digital amp/dac   
    Just about every interface by RME gives you multiple distinctly controllable output devices outside of a DAW. Whether you want to route different digital outputs to multiple physical outputs, or the same digital output to multiple physical outputs.

    For example, the RME Fireface UC. All 16 optical & 16 analog outputs show as distinct output devices in windows:


    On top of that RMEs digital mixer "Totalmix" (which actually controls the interface on a hardware level), lets you route any digital output to any physical output. Whether that be analog or ADAT / optical, and whether you want a stereo or mono output. Every individual physical output channel can be toggled between stereo / mono, and act as their own sub-mix:


    OP while you could use something like the RME 802 to get 10+ mono analog outputs on "one" interface, they cost a whopping $2000. And the 802 has multiple mic inputs / pre amps which do nothing to suit your case. I believe the "dream" device you're looking for is the RME Digiface USB, with an Aphex Model 141 ADAT expansion, not that it would be astronomically cheaper ($900). Basically the Digiface sends digital outputs over the ADAT / optical connector(s) to the Aphex Model 141, which converts the digital signal into 8 mono or 4 stereo outputs. The digiface already has 2 mono or 1 stereo analog output(s) via the headphone jack, so with one Digiface and one Aphex Model 141 you'd have 10 mono outputs. And since the the Digiface has 4 ADAT / Optical outputs, that gives you up to 32 mono, or 16 stereo outputs via ADAT / optical if you ever wanted to expand. The Digiface would show in your operating system as 16 separate output devices, similar to how I explained with the Fireface above. And the Digiface can be used with Totalmix (RME's mixer) just like the Fireface, meaning you can basically accomplish any routing that you want.

    That being said, I don't believe any of RME's newer interfaces support Linux, as you've alluded you might be using it. Maybe you could just run Ubuntu on-top of windows using WSL or WSL2.

    Short video explaining basics of totalmix:
     
  20. Like
    Ninbura got a reaction from Azp3ct in Dual PC Setup Sound Issues   
    This is the configuration I would recommend for the MG10XU in a multi-PC streaming / recording setup:


    Apologies for the messy diagram, but it just takes waaay to long to make something like this look clean. Basically with this setup you're sending the Mic input to the FX Send output, converting it to a stereo signal, splitting the signal with a powered splitter, and then sending it to the line level inputs on your capture PC and Gaming PC which lets you utilize one mic for both PCs. Additionally you are sending the HDMI signal from your computer (and other consoles if desired) into an HDMI audio extractor, which then sends your game audio to your mixer and your capture card so you get high quality, low delay, stereo audio to both your capture and your headphones. Ground loop isolators help eliminate buzzing in various analog connections, but it's always best to try and keep your audio cables away from power cables so you don't get noise bleeding in in the first place.

    In your case, if you wanted to keep the dbx 286s you'd just insert that in-between your mic and the mixer, though it's really not necessary. The MG10XU can supply enough gain even to the SM7B, has a hardware compressor if you really want it, and you can just use OBS and Discord to apply noise gates. I understand the dbx has a few more options than that, but I'd say they're a bit gimmicky for this situation. 

    Relevant links:
    Ground Loop Isolator
    1/4 TRS to 3.5mm TRS
    3.5mm TRS to Dual 1/4 TS
    1/4 Male TRS to 3.5mm Female TRS
    1/4 Female TS to 1/4 Male TRS
    1/4 TRS to 1/4 TRS
    Dual 1/4 TS to Dual RCA
    XLR Cable
    1/4 Stereo Splitter
    HDMI 2.0 Switch
    HDMI 2.0 Audio Extractor
  21. Like
    Ninbura got a reaction from Azp3ct in Dual PC Setup Sound Issues   
    I think one major problem with OP's current setup is that he's looping his game audio through his capture PC to the MG10XU and then into his Focusrite via a mono connection. This would explain his distaste for game audio, as he's only getting 1 channel (mono mapped to faux stereo) and delay from looping it around. 

    The problem with just attempting to connect the gaming PC to another input on the mixer is that one can't route audio to both a mixer & a capture card. At least not without a program like VoiceMeeter, which would add noticeable delay to something like a game which you're constantly interacting with, and it would desync the audio with the video via the HDMI connection. That's why I believe an HDMI audio extractor would be the best solution, negligible delay, and high quality stereo output to both the mixer / headphones & the capture card.

    Though it'll take more than the HDMI audio extractor to meet all of OP's goals:
    1) Route mic independently to both PCs
    2) Separate Game audio and Discord audio
    3) Improve game audio quality (to headphones)
    4) Properly route alert audio

    With the diagram I posted OP should be able to achieve all 4 goals:
    1) OP's mic is being independently routed to both PCs, meaning he can isolate his mic for OBS & Discord on his capture PC, and for game chat on his gaming PC.
    2) OP's capture PC is connected to the USB connection on the MG10XU, which means he has now separated his game and Discord audio. Game audio being on channels 5/6 via the HDMI extractor, and Discord audio being on channels 9/10 via the USB connection.
    3) OP's game audio is being split via the HDMI audio extractor to his capture card and soundboard, which allows OBS and his headphones to pick it up in high quality & stereo with negligible delay.
    4) OP's alert audio can also be carried via the USB tether between his capture PC and the MG10XU, meaning he & the stream should be able to hear alerts. As he should already routing to his Discord audio (the MG10XU USB output) to the stream.

    Will require some additional cabling and equipment, but nothing major like another interface. In-fact, he could sell the Focusrite and the dbx pre to make up the difference in cost, and then some. Dual PC streaming setups can definitely be headache in the audio department, but if you do it "right" it can actually be quite liberating!
  22. Agree
    Ninbura got a reaction from ShearMe in Dual PC Setup Sound Issues   
    I think one major problem with OP's current setup is that he's looping his game audio through his capture PC to the MG10XU and then into his Focusrite via a mono connection. This would explain his distaste for game audio, as he's only getting 1 channel (mono mapped to faux stereo) and delay from looping it around. 

    The problem with just attempting to connect the gaming PC to another input on the mixer is that one can't route audio to both a mixer & a capture card. At least not without a program like VoiceMeeter, which would add noticeable delay to something like a game which you're constantly interacting with, and it would desync the audio with the video via the HDMI connection. That's why I believe an HDMI audio extractor would be the best solution, negligible delay, and high quality stereo output to both the mixer / headphones & the capture card.

    Though it'll take more than the HDMI audio extractor to meet all of OP's goals:
    1) Route mic independently to both PCs
    2) Separate Game audio and Discord audio
    3) Improve game audio quality (to headphones)
    4) Properly route alert audio

    With the diagram I posted OP should be able to achieve all 4 goals:
    1) OP's mic is being independently routed to both PCs, meaning he can isolate his mic for OBS & Discord on his capture PC, and for game chat on his gaming PC.
    2) OP's capture PC is connected to the USB connection on the MG10XU, which means he has now separated his game and Discord audio. Game audio being on channels 5/6 via the HDMI extractor, and Discord audio being on channels 9/10 via the USB connection.
    3) OP's game audio is being split via the HDMI audio extractor to his capture card and soundboard, which allows OBS and his headphones to pick it up in high quality & stereo with negligible delay.
    4) OP's alert audio can also be carried via the USB tether between his capture PC and the MG10XU, meaning he & the stream should be able to hear alerts. As he should already routing to his Discord audio (the MG10XU USB output) to the stream.

    Will require some additional cabling and equipment, but nothing major like another interface. In-fact, he could sell the Focusrite and the dbx pre to make up the difference in cost, and then some. Dual PC streaming setups can definitely be headache in the audio department, but if you do it "right" it can actually be quite liberating!
  23. Agree
    Ninbura reacted to ShearMe in Audio pop/crackle   
    Check out LatencyMon to nail down the problem: 
     
  24. Agree
    Ninbura reacted to ShearMe in Advice on getting an audio input switch to use on speakers?   
    BOOM: https://www.amazon.com/Nobsound-Audio-Switcher-Headphone-Selector/dp/B0787X4J4V?ref_=ast_sto_dp&th=1&psc=1
     
    ALTERNATIVE BOOM: https://www.amazon.com/Nobsound-Audio-Switcher-Selector-Splitter/dp/B07Q1W4484?ref_=ast_sto_dp
  25. Informative
    Ninbura got a reaction from GamersCouch in Astro A50 gen 4 pc AND console connection setup   
    If I understand the interface that transmits to the headphones correctly your best bet would be a simple USB Switch. You’ll still have to switch two things, that being the switch on the back of the station, and the new USB switch. But it’ll be less of a hassle in comparison to Manually switching the cable between 2 devices. 
     
    Something like this:
    https://www.amazon.com/Plugable-Sharing-One-Button-Swapping-Computers/dp/B00JX3Q28Y/ref=mp_s_a_1_6?keywords=usb+3.0+switch&qid=1583438603&sr=8-6
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