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dragonxt

How do ek 90degree fittings work

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28 minutes ago, dragonxt said:

https://www.ekwb.com/shop/ek-af-angled-90-g1-4-nickel

 

Does that attach to a tube directly? if so then do I need a Male-Male adapter to connect the other side of the fitting to a pump?

Coming out of a component, the male threads will thread into that (res, rad, pump, block) or other fittings., the female threads will accept a barb, compression fitting, or some other form of male threaded connector allowing you to connect your tubing together, which depends on the type of tubing that youre using; hardline, soft, and inner/outer diameter.


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Posted · Original PosterOP
4 hours ago, Semper said:

Coming out of a component, the male threads will thread into that (res, rad, pump, block) or other fittings., the female threads will accept a barb, compression fitting, or some other form of male threaded connector allowing you to connect your tubing together, which depends on the type of tubing that youre using; hardline, soft, and inner/outer diameter.

I'm doing hard. If you click on the link I don't see how I can use that fitting to connect a rad and tube...

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57 minutes ago, dragonxt said:

I'm doing hard. If you click on the link I don't see how I can use that fitting to connect a rad and tube...

The O-ring side of this fitting can screw into your radiator. On the other side of this 90 fitting you can connect a normal compression fitting. The hard tube will go on that fitting like on any other fitting. 

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3 hours ago, dragonxt said:

I'm doing hard. If you click on the link I don't see how I can use that fitting to connect a rad and tube...

In this case, you're going to be using exclusive rigid tubing "compression" fittings.
Generally, the well made ones use a double O-Ring system, one in contact between the base of the fitting and the end of your tube,  and another around the cap.

http://www.frozencpu.com/products/22418/ex-tub-2513/Bitspower_G_14_Enhanced_Multi-Link_Adapter_-_12mm_OD_Rigid_Tube_-_Carbon_Black_BP-CBEML.html

 

Again, however, the fittings you will buy will depend on the diameter of your tubing.


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Posted · Original PosterOP
13 hours ago, Semper said:

In this case, you're going to be using exclusive rigid tubing "compression" fittings.
Generally, the well made ones use a double O-Ring system, one in contact between the base of the fitting and the end of your tube,  and another around the cap.

http://www.frozencpu.com/products/22418/ex-tub-2513/Bitspower_G_14_Enhanced_Multi-Link_Adapter_-_12mm_OD_Rigid_Tube_-_Carbon_Black_BP-CBEML.html

 

Again, however, the fittings you will buy will depend on the diameter of your tubing.

 

14 hours ago, daimonie said:

The O-ring side of this fitting can screw into your radiator. On the other side of this 90 fitting you can connect a normal compression fitting. The hard tube will go on that fitting like on any other fitting. 

So are you saying I can't attach a tube to the O ring side of that fitting, and use a male to male extender on the other female side of that fitting linked above?

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20 minutes ago, dragonxt said:

 

So are you saying I can't attach a tube to the O ring side of that fitting, and use a male to male extender on the other female side of that fitting linked above?

Not if you'd like to keep your coolant in your tubing and off other components.

Fittings themselves don't create a seal. The o rings  being compressed around the tube do.

I'd strongly suggest you watch some of jayztwocents guides on watercooling, he's got a dozen or more by now. I feel that you're diving into something that's going to be overwhelming for you. Rigid tubing is the more difficult of the two (conventional) plumbing methods, and you don't yet have a grasp on how fittings work.


https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkWQ0gDrqOCarmUKmppD7GQ


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Posted · Original PosterOP
6 hours ago, Semper said:

Not if you'd like to keep your coolant in your tubing and off other components.

Fittings themselves don't create a seal. The o rings  being compressed around the tube do.

I'd strongly suggest you watch some of jayztwocents guides on watercooling, he's got a dozen or more by now. I feel that you're diving into something that's going to be overwhelming for you. Rigid tubing is the more difficult of the two (conventional) plumbing methods, and you don't yet have a grasp on how fittings work.


https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkWQ0gDrqOCarmUKmppD7GQ

Thank you, though I wouldn't come to the forums without searching every other resource first.

 

This seems to have an o-ring, hence my confusion. https://www.ekwb.com/shop/ek-af-extender-6mm-m-m-black-nickel

 

Would that not work?

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1 hour ago, dragonxt said:

Thank you, though I wouldn't come to the forums without searching every other resource first.

 

This seems to have an o-ring, hence my confusion. https://www.ekwb.com/shop/ek-af-extender-6mm-m-m-black-nickel

 

Would that not work?

It wouldn't. The only thing that o-ring on that extender is doing is preventing a leak from occurring between whatever it's connecting. An extender such as this is going to be used to connect two objects of your loop together, be it two fittings, two components, or a fitting to a component for some reason.

Your tubing needs some type of barb or compression point that can create a seal around it. If you're using barbs, you'll also secure the tubing down with a clamp (zip ties work as well). if you're using a compression fitting, the collar that you screw down will create the compression point.You tubing is not threaded into anything in any of the conventional liquid cooling methods I know of.

The threads themselves in any part of your loop aren't going to create a seal of any kind, it's the o-ring between two objects that creates the seal.

A use case example of one of the extenders you're talking about would look like this (note, I don't know why you would ever need to do something like this example, I'm just hoping this gives you a better understanding):

three components ((from left-to-right)
a 90° fitting adapter (one male, one female threading)
a rotary extender same concept at the extender, but built slightly different (two male threadings)
A 45° fitting adapter. (one male one female threading)

Spoiler

f1tFMpg.jpg?1


when broken down into their own parts, look like this:

Spoiler

m0YWC9X.jpg


the extender in the middle creates a seal between the two flat surfaces on the faces of the neighboring components with the red o-ring. The threads serve to hold pressure on the o-ring, they do not create a seal.

To attach a tube to a fitting (in this case, soft tubing using a barb, as I do not have any hardline tubing fittings or tube to provide an example) you're going to use a fitting that has a barb built into it, (or a threaded adapter (such as the 45° fitting adapter above) with a barb attached to it, which would look like this) or a fitting that already has a barb built into it
 

Spoiler

8yzJcXR.jpg

The tube fits around this barb, which is ever so slightly larger than the inner diameter of the tube, and creates a pressure point at the lip

Spoiler

kFOicuV.jpg


The tube is then secured down with a clamp (or zip tie) which prevents water pressure from eventually allowing it to walk off or be blown off.
 

Spoiler

K1GvYlj.jpg

 

compression fittings work much the same way, they have a barb inside of them, but the clamp is replaced with a collar that threads down around the tube creating that pressure point and resisting the tube walking off. this tube-fitted-barb would then very likely be threaded into a component (let's say a radiator) where the threads once again pull the fitting against the radiator, and the o-ring between them creates the seal.
The structure of a soft tube compression fitting looks like this:

Spoiler

Sio2y6w.jpg

 


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CPU:  Intel  i7-4790k | RAM: 4x4GB G.Skill Ripjaws Z | Cooling: XSPC/EK/Bitspower loop | MOBO: MSI Z97-G45 | PSU: Seasonic Prime 750 Titanium  

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Posted · Original PosterOP
17 hours ago, Semper said:

It wouldn't. The only thing that o-ring on that extender is doing is preventing a leak from occurring between whatever it's connecting. An extender such as this is going to be used to connect two objects of your loop together, be it two fittings, two components, or a fitting to a component for some reason.

Your tubing needs some type of barb or compression point that can create a seal around it. If you're using barbs, you'll also secure the tubing down with a clamp (zip ties work as well). if you're using a compression fitting, the collar that you screw down will create the compression point.You tubing is not threaded into anything in any of the conventional liquid cooling methods I know of.

The threads themselves in any part of your loop aren't going to create a seal of any kind, it's the o-ring between two objects that creates the seal.

A use case example of one of the extenders you're talking about would look like this (note, I don't know why you would ever need to do something like this example, I'm just hoping this gives you a better understanding):

three components ((from left-to-right)
a 90° fitting adapter (one male, one female threading)
a rotary extender same concept at the extender, but built slightly different (two male threadings)
A 45° fitting adapter. (one male one female threading)

  Reveal hidden contents

f1tFMpg.jpg?1


when broken down into their own parts, look like this:

  Reveal hidden contents

m0YWC9X.jpg


the extender in the middle creates a seal between the two flat surfaces on the faces of the neighboring components with the red o-ring. The threads serve to hold pressure on the o-ring, they do not create a seal.

To attach a tube to a fitting (in this case, soft tubing using a barb, as I do not have any hardline tubing fittings or tube to provide an example) you're going to use a fitting that has a barb built into it, (or a threaded adapter (such as the 45° fitting adapter above) with a barb attached to it, which would look like this) or a fitting that already has a barb built into it
 

  Reveal hidden contents

8yzJcXR.jpg

The tube fits around this barb, which is ever so slightly larger than the inner diameter of the tube, and creates a pressure point at the lip

  Reveal hidden contents

kFOicuV.jpg


The tube is then secured down with a clamp (or zip tie) which prevents water pressure from eventually allowing it to walk off or be blown off.
 

  Reveal hidden contents

K1GvYlj.jpg

 

compression fittings work much the same way, they have a barb inside of them, but the clamp is replaced with a collar that threads down around the tube creating that pressure point and resisting the tube walking off. this tube-fitted-barb would then very likely be threaded into a component (let's say a radiator) where the threads once again pull the fitting against the radiator, and the o-ring between them creates the seal.
The structure of a soft tube compression fitting looks like this:

  Reveal hidden contents

Sio2y6w.jpg

 

Thank you! That was very thorough. 

 

Guess I now have to order some fittings. 

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