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JovanD

[Video idea] Nuclear reactor cooling for PC!

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Okay the title is a little clik-baity, but it's true in principle.

Idea is to create liquid cooling loop, but instead of water put liquid metal and instead of regular pump put electromagnetic pump (should be simple-ish to make diy one) and maybe instead of regular radiator put a passive one since the pump is not gonna have any moving parts might as well make it a 0 db cooling uber gaming pc :D
 

What do ya guys think?

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3 minutes ago, JovanD said:

Okay the title is a little clik-baity, but it's true in principle.

Idea is to create liquid cooling loop, but instead of water put liquid metal and instead of regular pump put electromagnetic pump (should be simple-ish to make diy one) and maybe instead of regular radiator put a passive one since the pump is not gonna have any moving parts might as well make it a 0 db cooling uber gaming pc :D
 

What do ya guys think?

How do you keep the metal in a liquid state?


 

 

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6 minutes ago, JovanD said:

Okay the title is a little clik-baity, but it's true in principle.

Idea is to create liquid cooling loop, but instead of water put liquid metal and instead of regular pump put electromagnetic pump (should be simple-ish to make diy one) and maybe instead of regular radiator put a passive one since the pump is not gonna have any moving parts might as well make it a 0 db cooling uber gaming pc :D
 

What do ya guys think?

Thread title is a bit misleading, but this is where you need to post video suggestions: 

 

 


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going by the most commonly used metals for cooling reactors, you basically only have two options, since the other 4 have melting points at 97c (sodium), 327c (lead), 123c (lead-bismuth euectic) and 231c (tin) so it wouldn't "cool" anything down, it would heat it up significantly.

 

Which leaves us with mercury (-39c) and Sodium-potassium alloy (-11c)

 

Mercury is highly toxic and has a high vapor pressure at room temperature, which means heating it up with PC components will quickly burst a loop, unless you vent it out, but again, it's toxic as shit and would need much more power to circulate it since it's so heavy.

 

And Sodium-potassium alloy has the fun little quirk of just outright catching fire when exposed to air.

 

neither of these would be a good idea.

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9 minutes ago, JovanD said:

Using Gallium should be enough, if not Galinstan (or similar alloy) can be used instead

Gallium is corrosive..

It will react with aluminium, copper, etc..

 

Edit: Here are other threads with the same concept

Spoiler

 

 

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35 minutes ago, Arika S said:

[...]

And Sodium-potassium alloy has the fun little quirk of just outright catching fire when exposed to air.

 

neither of these would be a good idea.

idk about you but personally I think watching liquid cooled PC where the fluid is on fire while it's running would be very bad ass and entertaining

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10 hours ago, Alexsolo said:

How do you keep the metal in a liquid state?

Mercury is liquid at room temp, but it would destroy conventional cooling loops and pumps. Gallium and sodium would need to be heated, negating their ability to cool a computer. Eutectic sodium potassium alloy would destroy a big portion of a house if the coolant loop failed. 

 

Theres a reason metal is used to transfer heat in nuclear reactors, and not for every application that requires liquid cooling. 

 

The real next big things for exotic cooling are phase change immersion and microfluidic cooling built into ICs.

 

 

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Just use ethelene gylcol

A dielectric fluid, or perfluorinated carbons, such as 3M’s dielectric fluid Fluorinert.

PAO is a synthetic hydrocarbon used frequently in militiary and aerospace applications for its dielectric properties and wide range of operating temperatures. For example, the fire control radars on today’s jet fighters are liquid cooled using PAO.

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It wouldn't work.

 

Gallium, while having a very high heat conductivity, has a very low heat capacity. (0.37 J/g K) Water (and water based coolents) are good because they can absorb a shit ton of heat, and have a huge heat capacity (4.18 J/g K) Water has the highest heat capacity of any common material. That's what makes it so special, and so good for cooling. Every mL of water absorbs 4.18 Joules to heat up 1 degree C. While it would take 11 mL of gallium to absorb the same amount of heat. Simply put, gallium wouldn't be able to take the heat away fast enough. 

 

If you tried to cool with gallium it wouldn't be able to absorb enough heat quick enough to cool the chip. What would likely happen is that ALL of the gallium would heat up to the the temperature of the chip. Then it wouldn't be able to absorb any more heat (because there would be no heat differential between the chip and the liquid). Then your chip would overheat. 

 

There is a reason why almost every cooling system in the world uses a water based coolant. The ethylene glycol (antifreeze) is just there to make sure the water doesn't freeze and also raise the boiling point a bit. You are actually DECREASING the ability of the water to cool when you add antifreeze. Other additives are added to add properties like lubrication or corrosion protection/bacterial growth inhibition, but they all GENERALLY make the cooling properties of the coolant worse. 

 

Source: Am chemist, I know this shit. 

 

EDIT: Liquid ammonia has a SLIGHTLY higher heat capacity but trust me.... you really don't want to work with that crap unless you feel like throwing up.

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The best compound is some dihydrogen monoxide usually mixed with some colors of choice. Be careful with it though, 100% of people who come in contact with it, will die eventually :D


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3 hours ago, corrado33 said:

 

Source: Am chemist, I know this shit.

yea this is why the common one are common, they are they least poisonous most effective in application for use totally agree with corrado33  that chemistry is chemistry and adding shit lowers the fluid effectiveness, but luckily water is so damn effective its ok

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Just do it like Japan and use sea water. 


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