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KeyzHostHD

Need Help With C++/Binary (Not Really Help)

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Need Help With C++/Binary (Not Really Help)

i just need a place on the internet where i can learn c++ and learn to understand and read binary code, 

please no books just free websites , and i know this can take months or years to acomplish i have set my self a goal to go down this path and learn it 

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44 minutes ago, fpo said:

Cplusplus.com

sololearn.com

http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/ more specifically. That site has a lot of information to get lost in.

 

You say you want to learn binary code, but I'm not sure you know what you really mean by that.

I think you are looking to perhaps understand the bytecode/machine code a Binary file may have as in trying to reverse engineer a binary executable. That specifically wouldn't be a place to start. But please correct me if I'm way off in that.

 

 

As for learning a raw meaning of binary as a number system, I think https://www.mathsisfun.com/binary-number-system.html honestly breaks it down in an easily digestible way. It even has a little thing where you can see what binary, decimal, and hexadecimal (and all others) break down and really look like.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 minute ago, Lichig0 said:

http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/ more specifically. That site has a lot of information to get lost in.

 

You say you want to learn binary code, but I'm not sure you know what you really mean by that.

I think you are looking to perhaps understand the bytecode/machine code a Binary file may have as in trying to reverse engineer a binary executable. That specifically wouldn't be a place to start. But please correct me if I'm way off in that.

 

 

As for learning a raw meaning of binary as a number system, I think https://www.mathsisfun.com/binary-number-system.html honestly breaks it down in an easily digestible way. It even has a little thing where you can see what binary, decimal, and hexadecimal (and all others) break down and really look like.

i meant like to know what 100101010 whould do and to read it into hex and normal 10 system 

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1 hour ago, KeyzHostHD said:

i meant like to know what 100101010 whould do and to read it into hex and normal 10 system 

How to read binary? 

Those are set by standards. Wikipedia should have a chart showing the ANSI standard for binary. 

 

There are several standards 


PC game list: 

Build Plan: 

 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
6 minutes ago, fpo said:

How to read binary? 

Those are set by standards. Wikipedia should have a chart showing the ANSI standard for binary. 

 

There are several standards 

wow so its alot of work to learn all these and be able to use them ?>

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Just now, KeyzHostHD said:

wow so its alot of work to learn all these and be able to use them ?>

No one learns binary. 

You don’t use them. 


PC game list: 

Build Plan: 

 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 minute ago, fpo said:

No one learns binary. 

You don’t use them. 

so how do the people create basic input output system , dont they need to tell the bios to do this do that how does it make those decisions by itself , is it just technology ?

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Just now, KeyzHostHD said:

so how do the people create basic input output system , dont they need to tell the bios to do this do that how does it make those decisions by itself , is it just technology ?

I think using assembly. 

Maybe C. Idk. 


PC game list: 

Build Plan: 

 

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5 hours ago, fpo said:

No one learns binary. 

You don’t use them. 

Not true. But I get your hyperbole there.

 

Compilers and interpreters do the work of converting your code into binary.

Basically that binary means something to the CPU, it's an instruction for that CPU. Different CPUs have different instruction sets, for example x86 and x64 (and I believe ARM) are architectures/instruction sets.

 

But don't take my word for it, I could be wrong or not 100% actuate. Learning how to research these things are maybe half the battle.

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10 minutes ago, Lichig0 said:

Not true. But I get your hyperbole there.

Yeah. You COULD learn that 00000001 is 1 or A (depending on the variable used) but it’s not that useful. 

 

Edit now that I think about it... if you take some physical circuit classes you might end up learning about digital logic, OP. One class taught how to design some 2 or 4 bit computers using transistors, switches & LED. 


PC game list: 

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15 hours ago, fpo said:

Yeah. You COULD learn that 00000001 is 1 or A (depending on the variable used) but it’s not that useful. 

 

Edit now that I think about it... if you take some physical circuit classes you might end up learning about digital logic, OP. One class taught how to design some 2 or 4 bit computers using transistors, switches & LED. 

Or you could learn binary, which fairly easily translates to hexadecimal, which is useful if setting colors with hex values.

Or knowing which bits need to be flipped for permissions in Unix/Linux (chmod).

Or doing bitwise operations even...

 

In general is good to know how to at least be able to figure out what value a number is regardless which radix it is if you are going to be spending your whole time in the computer field. But I guess the point is you don't need to memorize it all, just enough to understand it.

 

As for just getting started in C; binary can take a little bit of a back seat, but I also never heard of a programming curriculum shipping binary.

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22 hours ago, KeyzHostHD said:

so how do the people create basic input output system , dont they need to tell the bios to do this do that how does it make those decisions by itself , is it just technology ?

To create basic input output system based on what you asked you wanted to start with is probably the most complex possible way to do it.

Its like you asked "hey i want to go into space and i'd like to use that soapbox car".

 

Just start with either these  :

- C++ compiled (or C) with launch parameters (for console call)

- Java compiled or applet with launch parameters (for console call)

- C# console application (parameters are not necessary)

 

These allow you to usually call them with command line like : "myapp.exe /admin /clearpreference /fullscreen"

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On 9/25/2018 at 1:23 PM, KeyzHostHD said:

and learn to understand and read binary code

Binary is just a base-2 representation of a plain number.

 

You're used to decimal, which is a base-10 representation. Each digit in a number has 10 possible values, ranging from 0 to 9. When a digit reaches it's maximum - 9 - and you add one more it overflows back to 0 and 1 gets added to the digit left to it. So 19 becomes 20, etc...

 

Binary is a base-2 representation. Each digit in a number has 2 possible values, 0 and 1. When a digit reaches it's maximum - 1 - and you add one more it overflows back to 0 and 1 gets added to the digit left to it. So 101 (decimal 5) becomes 110 (decimal 6), etc...

Computers use binary because 0 and 1, off and on, is all a digital system understands.

 

Hexadecimal is a base-16 representation. Each digit has 16 possible values. From 0 to 9 and then 'A' for 10, 'B' for 11, and so on to 'F' for 15. When a digit reaches it's maximum - F - and you add one more it overflows back to 0 and 1 gets added to the digit left to it, so 1F (31 decimal) becomes 20 (32 decimal), etc...

Hexadecimal is useful because each digit maps directly to groups of 4 binary bits in a number, which can help manipulating numbers easier:

xhex_to_binary_001.gif.pagespeed.ic.pOvW

 

So they're all just ways to represent numbers, which is really all a computer understands. Even text is stored as numbers, each number representing a agreed upon letter. So the meaning depends completely on the context. You can have a Wave audio file, where each number represents a discrete audio sample value in time, outputting those numbers trough a DAC to a speaker plays back the stored audio. You can have a ASCII text file, where each number represents a letter according to the ASCII table . And you can have executable code where each number represents a CPU instruction to execute. 

 

However, just like it makes little sense to work with the numbers directly when you're working with and editing audio or text - one uses specialized audio editing software or a text editor instead - one nearly never works with the CPU instruction numbers (called machine code) directly. One uses tools instead, like an assembler - which converts human readable instructions called mnemonics into machine code for you - or higher programming languages like C++, which gets converted to assember and then machine code for you.

 

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