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Storm-Chaser

Most rare / most valuable CPU in existence?

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Two part question. In searching for my next CPU acquisition I came across the Intel Pentium 4 Extreme Edition 3.73Ghz / JM80547PH1092MM (BX80547PH3730F) and I see people asking insane amounts of money for these things. Upwards of $600 dollars (and that's just the 3.46Ghz variant)

I'm asking myself and you guys, if this is one of the most rare processors in existence?
AND
What do you think is the most "valuable" CPU? This is a more subjective question.

 

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HP Z820 workstation - dual CPUs - 24C / 48T @ 3.5GHz (turbo) and octal channel 64GB ecc ram, 300GB raid 0 x 4 SSD, water cooled (from the factory), MSI Radeon RX 5700 XT Gaming X 8GB GPU

 

 

 

 

 

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I think people are asking a lot for those CPUs since they're basically a collector's item at this point, and worth even more if it's still in the original packaging.

9 minutes ago, Storm-Chaser said:

I'm asking myself and you guys, if this is one of the most rare processors in existence?
AND
What do you think is the most "valuable" CPU? This is a more subjective question.

1. The Intel 8080 or AMD 8090 are both probably more rare at this point in time.

 

2. Define "valuable" in this case.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
2 minutes ago, Crunchy Dragon said:

I think people are asking a lot for those CPUs since they're basically a collector's item at this point, and worth even more if it's still in the original packaging.

1. The Intel 8080 or AMD 8090 are both probably more rare at this point in time.

 

2. Define "valuable" in this case.

Define what CPU has been your favorite or left the strongest impression on you or your rig. This is more of an individual type question. When I say valuable I don't mean most expensive.

 

For example, the most valuable CPU that I can think of for me is my AMD Zosma core 970. This is unique because it unlocks to a hexacore and overclocks stable to 4.0Ghz.  I had it overclocked for close to seven years and it never missed a beat. That's why it will always hold a special place in my heart. 

 

 


HP Z820 workstation - dual CPUs - 24C / 48T @ 3.5GHz (turbo) and octal channel 64GB ecc ram, 300GB raid 0 x 4 SSD, water cooled (from the factory), MSI Radeon RX 5700 XT Gaming X 8GB GPU

 

 

 

 

 

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20 minutes ago, Storm-Chaser said:

Two part question. In searching for my next CPU acquisition I came across the Intel Pentium 4 Extreme Edition 3.73Ghz / JM80547PH1092MM (BX80547PH3730F) and I see people asking insane amounts of money for these things. Upwards of $600 dollars (and that's just the 3.46Ghz variant)

I'm asking myself and you guys, if this is one of the most rare processors in existence?
AND
What do you think is the most "valuable" CPU? This is a more subjective question.

 

s-l1600.jpg

Well that certainly depends on if you're talking about CPUs that actually made it to market, or just engineering samples - The latter would of course be much more rare than even the most rare CPUs in the former category. Something like an iAPX 432 sample would probably be quite valuable if ever discovered. Though I can't remember if it made it to market and just failed completely or was pulled before release.


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most rare, I'm sure others can give better answers than mine.

 

most valuable, will be my 2600k. It introduced me to overclocking after all, though sadly Sandy Bridge's limited memory frequency multipliers stops me from going 2230MHz+ on the memory.


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