Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
couches

Delidding Workshop

Recommended Posts

Posted · Original PosterOP

I know you guys have talked on video about the delidding workshop but I would rather not try to guess which video or video(s) that is.  I got a 8700K still in the box and would really like to delid it.  Is that going to work for the company who is doing this?  Do we need to buy their processors specifically?  What thermal goo are they going to use?  Is there an option of requesting for (more expensive) goo that has longevity similar to Intel's?

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/27/2018 at 11:55 AM, AlexTheGreatish said:

I figured we would use TG Kyronaught, since it is longer lasting and doesn't have the potential for disaster like liquid metal.  We will have some Conductonaught and conformal coating on hand though if you are feeling adventurous.

Try asking in this thread?


My System - Featuring Custom Laser Etching: (I Need to re-host the pictures :()
http://linustechtips.com/main/topic/11149-my-custom-rig-ft-custom-laser-etching/

Link to post
Share on other sites

You'll be delidding your own processor, we'll be walking you through the steps but I won't actually touch it - anything that goes wrong is on you.  That said we'll have all the right equipment there so it should be relatively low risk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A bit of a PSA: If you're planning to delid a 7 series Ryzen processor- don't; they stuff is soldered on and pretty good as is; Derbauer himself only achieved a 2 degree difference in the process after going through several processors. (Was going to bring my own before I knew this, just a bit of a healthy warning) :) 

 

Edit- @AlexTheGreatish- just a suggestion, but the crew may want to be on the lookout for people trying to delid AMD Ryzen based processors since they'll probably kill them, regardless of how careful everyone is or atleast let them know why it's not a good idea.

 

Sources-PCper articleTechPowerUp article


PC in Profile

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Keystone Nyan Cat said:

A bit of a PSA: If you're planning to delid a 7 series Ryzen processor- don't; they stuff is soldered on and pretty good as is; Derbauer himself only achieved a 2 degree difference in the process after going through several processors. (Was going to bring my own before I knew this, just a bit of a healthy warning) :) 

 

Edit- @AlexTheGreatish- just a suggestion, but the crew may want to be on the lookout for people trying to delid AMD Ryzen based processors since they'll probably kill them, regardless of how careful everyone is or atleast let them know why it's not a good idea.

 

Sources-PCper articleTechPowerUp article

If someone tries to delid a Ryzen chip they'll be kindly refused and then brutally laughed at once they have left.  Everyone will have one on one attention to avoid potential errors, and a Ryzen chip won't even fit in our tools so there is really no way to screw that one up.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Alex,

 

I was your first customer at the delidding booth yesterday at LTX. I had to silicon glue my CPU back together. I tried the CPU today and it hits on 2 cores 100 degrees within seconds of the stress test.

could it be, that there is not enough contact between the die, Kryonaut and the heatspreader? I reapplied Kryonout between block and heatspreader again, although it looked fine.

 

Any tip appreciated. I am playing with the idea to carefully get the heatspreader back off and reapply a bit more Kryonaut.

 

Cpu is set to 4.7 GHz and 1.31V.

Link to post
Share on other sites

@PacsterDude sounds like you didn't clean up the previous adhesive properly if there is paste on the die.

 

try removing the lid again with a Stanley knife to break the silicon seal, clean both silicon and TIM off again from both sides, reapply.....if you shouldn't need to glue them back together just use the socket retention mechanism to provide the proper mounting pressure

Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, BubblyCharizard said:

@PacsterDude sounds like you didn't clean up the previous adhesive properly if there is paste on the die.

 

try removing the lid again with a Stanley knife to break the silicon seal, clean both silicon and TIM off again from both sides, reapply.....if you shouldn't need to glue them back together just use the socket retention mechanism to provide the proper mounting pressure

That would have been my next plan for fixing it. Thanks for your advice!b

Link to post
Share on other sites

LilCamwin, I would do some Q&D troubleshooting before doing this or calling this a bad delidding. Check all the power connectors 24 pin, 4/8 pin, reseat the cpu, etc. But if that doesn't work and if you haven't already, try striping and pull the motherboard from the case. Inspect the socket pins closely and reinstall the cpu and cooler. Install single stick of ram and use the onboard graphics if you have them. (Use a min hardware needed to POST)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, what motherboard and cpu do you have. On some boards, just clearing the cmos doesn't work like the  Maximus needs a the q reset to be pushed.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2018-07-15 at 6:23 PM, BubblyCharizard said:

let us know how it works out

Ok, no change. I removed the lid and removed the silicone. I removed the TIM and reapplied. I put a bit more o it based on a video I found on YouTube. It will squeeze out anyway and Kryonaut is not conductable. I let the retention mechanism hold the lid.

 I have about 60-80 degrees on at least 3 cores of my 7700k with about 20% load. Starting a stress test let's it peak to 100 degrees on all cores and the frequency gets throttled to 3.6 GHz. I see the same even without overclocking.

 

What a I doing wrong? Does it need to be only a tiny amount of TIM, like Alex told me? I am afraid that it doesn't touch the lid. Is my Kryonaut isolating the cores from the lid?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Update.

 

many back and forth. I cleaned it up and reapplied Kryonaut thinner. No change.

I cleaned up and almost put no Kryonaut on it. No change.

 

I thought hard and found the one thing that is always the same: Kryonaut.

 

I had noticed that I got a scratching, grinding noise when I pushed down the lid. It seems as if there are crystals in the TIM. I can see scratch marks on my die.

 

I removed Kryonaut and used some MX-4,which I had lying around. And voila, I do not hit 100degrees anymore. The system stays under artificial load around 92-96 degrees Celsius. It seems to still drop the frequency on the cores but I can figure that out.

 

I wonder if there is anything like "bad Kryonaut".those crystals seem to have broken the thermal conductvity. I know that something needs to be in the TIM to let it conduct heat, but is it that?

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

On 7/16/2018 at 1:07 AM, LilCamwin said:

So just got home back to the states... looks like I messed up. I’m getting post code 00. Think I’m screwed?

Most likely there is some crap on the pads of the CPU or on the socket pins.  Take the CPU out and make sure that there isn't any silicon that could have gotten on the bottom.

57 minutes ago, PacsterDude said:

Snip

This is really weird.  The most likely thing is that the silicon created a small air gap and that is what caused the high temps.  As far as I know there aren't any crystals in Kryonaut, maybe there was some contamination in your tube, v strange either way.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Buy VPN

×