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      Please Use CODE Tags   31 Jan 2016

      Welcome to the Programming and Software Design Section,

      When asking for help with programming issues, please use the code tags to enclose your code, it makes things much more easily readable for the people trying to help you, thus improving your chances of actually getting help.
        To add code tags, click the <> button on the editor toolbar, then enter your code in the code editor that appears. If you are on a mobile device, or prefer to use BBCode, you can use [code] // Your code here // It will be syntax highlighted, though not necessarily corectly. [/code] (but the code editor is more consistent and less buggy).
OCD-FREAK

programming languages ?

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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 minute ago, riklaunim said:

You have a specialization you want to pursue and that's a good thing to do.

thanks, but i also would like advice and tips from professionals like you :) so give me as much info as you possibly can :) 

 

much appreciated and many thanks 

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5 minutes ago, OCD-FREAK said:

since you are a senior, i am sure you would be able to give me the best tips on how can i learn C and java quick and in a professional way. by the way why you suggested me to stop learning C ? if it's the best language for hardware level programming? by the way i am also doing assembler too :) 

I believe this forum has resources for learning Java back on it's main thread for programming. Udemy has great courses for this as well, depending of the application type you are trying to develop.

 

From what I understand C has not matured to today's standards: https://www.quora.com/Which-one-should-I-learn-first-C-or-C++
Keep in mind that building applications is easy, but building applications that last is very difficult. Build your application roots as mentioned in my previous post.

Also, Visual Studio supports C++ natively...

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On 2018-07-10 at 8:53 AM, Dat Guy said:

Which problem is not covered by C?

Web front-ends ;) The reality is you can solve a problem in probably any language, but that doesn't mean you should. If C was the be-all-end-all of programming languages, then why is it not solely taught in CS programs across the world and solely used by companies?


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12 minutes ago, Dat Guy said:

German universities exclusively teach Java (or Python, depends) these days. 

Why do they teach just one language?I'm sure they cover embedded systems and web/mobile development so one language doesn't seem enough.

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5 hours ago, MyName13 said:

Why do they teach just one language?I'm sure they cover embedded systems and web/mobile development so one language doesn't seem enough.

There is some disparity between commercial/actual codding and university studies. When you work as Python developer you make for example web apps with Django. When you study computer science on a university you are learning about why and how things work. You may have basics of making an Android or a Django web app but in general it's not "commercial" stuff specific to popular software stacks. So if a university "teaches" a language then it means it uses given language as a tool to teach computer science with.

 

Some companies do offer commercial-value courses (like Microsoft) so if someone wants to he/she can get some commercial knowledge at university too - but not mandatory.

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15 minutes ago, riklaunim said:

There is some disparity between commercial/actual codding and university studies. When you work as Python developer you make for example web apps with Django. When you study computer science on a university you are learning about why and how things work. You may have basics of making an Android or a Django web app but in general it's not "commercial" stuff specific to popular software stacks. So if a university "teaches" a language then it means it uses given language as a tool to teach computer science with.

 

Some companies do offer commercial-value courses (like Microsoft) so if someone wants to he/she can get some commercial knowledge at university too - but not mandatory.

These universities differ a lot from universities in my region, universities over here teach at least 3 languages, usually C, C++ and Java.C is probably used for embedded systems subjects (usually first language) and C++ for computer graphics (openGL).

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There is always some diversity and then specialization but still a lot of things can be done with using one main language, especially if it's not full on Computer Science study.

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