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{Update} Over 150k projects ditch GitHub and move to GitLab following MSFT leaks & news

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Yay. Time to contemplate moving back to GitLab.


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2 hours ago, AskTJ said:

50k isn't a big amount of projects. There are a total amount of 85 million projects on GitHub so there's no problem there.

Yeah but a lot of those are dead or unmaintained projects, or forks of projects to develop a single patch to upstream back to the project.

 

Just looking at the total number of projects listed on the site isn't really representative.

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Yep, gitlab is super slow because it's being overwhelmed right now


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What is scaling and how does it work? Asus PB287Q unboxing! Console alternatives :D Watch Netflix with Kodi on Arch Linux Sharing folders over the internet using SSH Beginner's Guide To LTT (by iamdarkyoshi)

Sauron'stm Product Scores:

Spoiler

Just a list of my personal scores for some products, in no particular order, with brief comments. I just got the idea to do them so they aren't many for now :)

Don't take these as complete reviews or final truths - they are just my personal impressions on products I may or may not have used, summed up in a couple of sentences and a rough score. All scores take into account the unit's price and time of release, heavily so, therefore don't expect absolute performance to be reflected here.

 

-Lenovo Thinkpad X220 - [8/10]

Spoiler

A durable and reliable machine that is relatively lightweight, has all the hardware it needs to never feel sluggish and has a great IPS matte screen. Downsides are mostly due to its age, most notably the screen resolution of 1366x768 and usb 2.0 ports.

 

-Apple Macbook (2015) - [Garbage -/10]

Spoiler

From my perspective, this product has no redeeming factors given its price and the competition. It is underpowered, overpriced, impractical due to its single port and is made redundant even by Apple's own iPad pro line.

 

-OnePlus X - [7/10]

Spoiler

A good phone for the price. It does everything I (and most people) need without being sluggish and has no particularly bad flaws. The lack of recent software updates and relatively barebones feature kit (most notably the lack of 5GHz wifi, biometric sensors and backlight for the capacitive buttons) prevent it from being exceptional.

 

-Microsoft Surface Book 2 - [Garbage - -/10]

Spoiler

Overpriced and rushed, offers nothing notable compared to the competition, doesn't come with an adequate charger despite the premium price. Worse than the Macbook for not even offering the small plus sides of having macOS. Buy a Razer Blade if you want high performance in a (relatively) light package.

 

-Intel Core i7 2600/k - [9/10]

Spoiler

Quite possibly Intel's best product launch ever. It had all the bleeding edge features of the time, it came with a very significant performance improvement over its predecessor and it had a soldered heatspreader, allowing for efficient cooling and great overclocking. Even the "locked" version could be overclocked through the multiplier within (quite reasonable) limits.

 

-Apple iPad Pro - [5/10]

Spoiler

A pretty good product, sunk by its price (plus the extra cost of the physical keyboard and the pencil). Buy it if you don't mind the Apple tax and are looking for a very light office machine with an excellent digitizer. Particularly good for rich students. Bad for cheap tinkerers like myself.

 

 

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59 minutes ago, Sniperfox47 said:

Yeah but a lot of those are dead or unmaintained projects, or forks of projects to develop a single patch to upstream back to the project.

 

Just looking at the total number of projects listed on the site isn't really representative.

I do have to wonder how many of those 50K are just school projects and amateur shit like that.  In my experience business people who are easily spooked and don't wait to see whats happening before jumping ship usually end up bankrupt. 


QuicK and DirtY. Read the CoC it's like a guide on how not to be moron.  Also I don't have an issue with the VS series.

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4 hours ago, NMS said:

I love how people just assume that Microsoft will in some way destroy GitHub. You better be thankful it's not Facebook acquiring GH:D

That's not the assumption.

 

The assumption is that Microsoft will try to do what it always tries to do: make money. At the expense of customers, consumers and smaller companies if needed be, all things they've done before as a matter of law according to court decisions.

 

So they can probably do things like different pricing, integrating things (first as opt in of course, then eventually opt out) to make them compliant with Windows projects, pestering you to include some form of advertising modules, etc. I have no idea what they'll do but Nadella didn't spend almost 8 billion to not monetize this, likely aggressively so.

 

That is to say I have to consider what Mr Moose said:

56 minutes ago, mr moose said:

I do have to wonder how many of those 50K are just school projects and amateur shit like that.  In my experience business people who are easily spooked and don't wait to see whats happening before jumping ship usually end up bankrupt. 

There's probably maaany smaller customers like amateurs and such that just move out of reputation alone. Bigger companies probably can't move right away simply because bigger companies have a lot more pieces and IT departments need sign off before they're allowed to move and going to a meeting just to say 'Microsoft it's fucking evil maaaaan' it's not going to produce any results.

 

That being said even though you might not to immediately do anything (And serious users probably haven't) It's a good idea to at least keep an eye on things if the dog you had watching over your sheep has just been replaced by a wolf: Healthy skepticism of Microsoft is not a bad idea. Just not this "I am taking my shit elsewhere immediately!" gut reaction.


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1 minute ago, Misanthrope said:

That's not the assumption.

 

The assumption is that Microsoft will try to do what it always tries to do: make money. At the expense of customers, consumers and smaller companies if needed be, all things they've done before as a matter of law according to court decisions.

 

So they can probably do things like different pricing, integrating things (first as opt in of course, then eventually opt out) to make them compliant with Windows projects, pestering you to include some form of advertising modules, etc. I have no idea what they'll do but Nadella didn't spend almost 8 billion to not monetize this, likely aggressively so.

 

That is to say I have to consider what Mr Moose said:

There's probably maaany smaller customers like amateurs and such that just move out of reputation alone. Bigger companies probably can't move right away simply because bigger companies have a lot more pieces and IT departments need sign off before they're allowed to move and going to a meeting just to say 'Microsoft it's fucking evil maaaaan' it's not going to produce any results.

 

That being said even though you might not to immediately do anything (And serious users probably haven't) It's a good idea to at least keep an eye on things if the dog you had watching over your sheep has just been replaced by a wolf: Healthy skepticism of Microsoft is not a bad idea. Just not this "I am taking my shit elsewhere immediately!" gut reaction.

Alright, then why not assume that Microsoft will make GitHub even better? It's only fair to presume both sides before seeing the results.

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Just now, NMS said:

Alright, then why not assume that Microsoft will make GitHub even better? It's only fair to presume both sides before seeing the results.

They very well could yes: I have to concede that handling out modules for certain windows stuff through it or integrating it to windows more closely are things many devs will find desirable and not objectionable.

 

But I think we can at least agree there will be changes coming, whenever they end up being positive or negative or anywhere in between.


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1 minute ago, Misanthrope said:

That's not the assumption.

 

The assumption is that Microsoft will try to do what it always tries to do: make money. At the expense of customers, consumers and smaller companies if needed be, all things they've done before as a matter of law according to court decisions.

 

So they can probably do things like different pricing, integrating things (first as opt in of course, then eventually opt out) to make them compliant with Windows projects, pestering you to include some form of advertising modules, etc. I have no idea what they'll do but Nadella didn't spend almost 8 billion to not monetize this, likely aggressively so.

 

That is to say I have to consider what Mr Moose said:

There's probably maaany smaller customers like amateurs and such that just move out of reputation alone. Bigger companies probably can't move right away simply because bigger companies have a lot more pieces and IT departments need sign off before they're allowed to move and going to a meeting just to say 'Microsoft it's fucking evil maaaaan' it's not going to produce any results.

 

That being said even though you might not to immediately do anything (And serious users probably haven't) It's a good idea to at least keep an eye on things if the dog you had watching over your sheep has just been replaced by a wolf: Healthy skepticism of Microsoft is not a bad idea. Just not this "I am taking my shit elsewhere immediately!" gut reaction.

You're right, healthy skepticism is exactly that, healthy.    It's this "fuck MS" and "I'm moving" before the dust has even settled rhetoric that is not healthy, that's just a knee jerk reaction based on internet rhetoric/idealogs.  it's never worked for governments, it's ever worked for business and it will certainly never work for individuals. 


QuicK and DirtY. Read the CoC it's like a guide on how not to be moron.  Also I don't have an issue with the VS series.

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1 minute ago, Misanthrope said:

They very well could yes: I have to concede that handling out modules for certain windows stuff through it or integrating it to windows more closely are things many devs will find desirable and not objectionable.

 

But I think we can at least agree there will be changes coming, whenever they end up being positive or negative or anywhere in between.

Perhaps, but they could also just not touch any core components or interfere that much.

Though in my opinion, they might integrate it with Azure, which isn't bad anyway.

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1 hour ago, mr moose said:

I do have to wonder how many of those 50K are just school projects and amateur shit like that.

Most of them, for sure, but this is basically day one - migrating bigger projects would require time even if the decision to do so was instant. Businesses probably won't migrate until GH actually starts going downhill, FOSS projects may do so sooner because of ethical concerns.


sudo chmod -R 000 /*

What is scaling and how does it work? Asus PB287Q unboxing! Console alternatives :D Watch Netflix with Kodi on Arch Linux Sharing folders over the internet using SSH Beginner's Guide To LTT (by iamdarkyoshi)

Sauron'stm Product Scores:

Spoiler

Just a list of my personal scores for some products, in no particular order, with brief comments. I just got the idea to do them so they aren't many for now :)

Don't take these as complete reviews or final truths - they are just my personal impressions on products I may or may not have used, summed up in a couple of sentences and a rough score. All scores take into account the unit's price and time of release, heavily so, therefore don't expect absolute performance to be reflected here.

 

-Lenovo Thinkpad X220 - [8/10]

Spoiler

A durable and reliable machine that is relatively lightweight, has all the hardware it needs to never feel sluggish and has a great IPS matte screen. Downsides are mostly due to its age, most notably the screen resolution of 1366x768 and usb 2.0 ports.

 

-Apple Macbook (2015) - [Garbage -/10]

Spoiler

From my perspective, this product has no redeeming factors given its price and the competition. It is underpowered, overpriced, impractical due to its single port and is made redundant even by Apple's own iPad pro line.

 

-OnePlus X - [7/10]

Spoiler

A good phone for the price. It does everything I (and most people) need without being sluggish and has no particularly bad flaws. The lack of recent software updates and relatively barebones feature kit (most notably the lack of 5GHz wifi, biometric sensors and backlight for the capacitive buttons) prevent it from being exceptional.

 

-Microsoft Surface Book 2 - [Garbage - -/10]

Spoiler

Overpriced and rushed, offers nothing notable compared to the competition, doesn't come with an adequate charger despite the premium price. Worse than the Macbook for not even offering the small plus sides of having macOS. Buy a Razer Blade if you want high performance in a (relatively) light package.

 

-Intel Core i7 2600/k - [9/10]

Spoiler

Quite possibly Intel's best product launch ever. It had all the bleeding edge features of the time, it came with a very significant performance improvement over its predecessor and it had a soldered heatspreader, allowing for efficient cooling and great overclocking. Even the "locked" version could be overclocked through the multiplier within (quite reasonable) limits.

 

-Apple iPad Pro - [5/10]

Spoiler

A pretty good product, sunk by its price (plus the extra cost of the physical keyboard and the pencil). Buy it if you don't mind the Apple tax and are looking for a very light office machine with an excellent digitizer. Particularly good for rich students. Bad for cheap tinkerers like myself.

 

 

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11 hours ago, Misanthrope said:

Specially not that Britain kid that threw a tantrum to get out of his class but now is trying to contact all of the school mates individually anyways.

What school kid wouldn't prefer that anyway? I know I'd prefer to do that than have to do it quietly or not at all because the teacher was a strict dick. But I've been out of school a long while so don't know what schools are like now.

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5 hours ago, AluminiumTech said:

Yay. Time to contemplate moving back to GitLab.

With you on that one.


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1 hour ago, Sauron said:

Most of them, for sure, but this is basically day one - migrating bigger projects would require time even if the decision to do so was instant. Businesses probably won't migrate until GH actually starts going downhill, FOSS projects may do so sooner because of ethical concerns.

Yup, GIMP and a few others have already moved over to GitLab.


How to setup MSI Afterburner OSD | How to make your AMD Radeon GPU more efficient with Radeon Chill

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Just now, AluminiumTech said:

Yup, GIMP and a few others have already moved over to GitLab.

Oh really so there are notable/large projects moving over. This is more tempting to join the bandwagon now.


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As ambivalent as I am to the news, I really gotta say the knee-jerk hostilities are getting just about cringeworthy at this point. This isn't the only place, it's all over Reddit and whatnot too, and it's just goes to show feeble-mindedness and how scared people really are over the nothings in their lives.

 

I stopped using GitHub a while ago in favour of GitLab, and the main reason for that is cost. The price of a server will be constant regardless of how many websites I run on it, or how many domains I have, or what services I use and to what extent. It makes business sense to ditch an enterprise subscription with GitHub for that reason alone, in our case, and it has nothing to do with ethics or paranoia.

 

That said, I wasn't born yesterday either, and I know full well what Microsoft, like any skilled company, is capable of doing. It's nothing particular to them, but for our business there are always certain things that we can trust no one with, even if "it would be totally illegal for them to steal it." Have fun proving that in court, especially when the thing they stole would've made you the millions you need to protect it and now you're SOL. Also, ask Xerox and IBM how they're doing since Apple and Microsoft rolled on by. As I've said before, you either eat or get eaten in the business world, and even indie game studios had to learn this lesson the hard way sometimes (Vlambeer). You get the rest of it.


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1 hour ago, trag1c said:

Oh really so there are notable/large projects moving over. This is more tempting to join the bandwagon now.

GitLab offers automated repository migration, it's a matter of a few clicks - give it your github username and it does the rest. Can't hurt to at least copy things over.


sudo chmod -R 000 /*

What is scaling and how does it work? Asus PB287Q unboxing! Console alternatives :D Watch Netflix with Kodi on Arch Linux Sharing folders over the internet using SSH Beginner's Guide To LTT (by iamdarkyoshi)

Sauron'stm Product Scores:

Spoiler

Just a list of my personal scores for some products, in no particular order, with brief comments. I just got the idea to do them so they aren't many for now :)

Don't take these as complete reviews or final truths - they are just my personal impressions on products I may or may not have used, summed up in a couple of sentences and a rough score. All scores take into account the unit's price and time of release, heavily so, therefore don't expect absolute performance to be reflected here.

 

-Lenovo Thinkpad X220 - [8/10]

Spoiler

A durable and reliable machine that is relatively lightweight, has all the hardware it needs to never feel sluggish and has a great IPS matte screen. Downsides are mostly due to its age, most notably the screen resolution of 1366x768 and usb 2.0 ports.

 

-Apple Macbook (2015) - [Garbage -/10]

Spoiler

From my perspective, this product has no redeeming factors given its price and the competition. It is underpowered, overpriced, impractical due to its single port and is made redundant even by Apple's own iPad pro line.

 

-OnePlus X - [7/10]

Spoiler

A good phone for the price. It does everything I (and most people) need without being sluggish and has no particularly bad flaws. The lack of recent software updates and relatively barebones feature kit (most notably the lack of 5GHz wifi, biometric sensors and backlight for the capacitive buttons) prevent it from being exceptional.

 

-Microsoft Surface Book 2 - [Garbage - -/10]

Spoiler

Overpriced and rushed, offers nothing notable compared to the competition, doesn't come with an adequate charger despite the premium price. Worse than the Macbook for not even offering the small plus sides of having macOS. Buy a Razer Blade if you want high performance in a (relatively) light package.

 

-Intel Core i7 2600/k - [9/10]

Spoiler

Quite possibly Intel's best product launch ever. It had all the bleeding edge features of the time, it came with a very significant performance improvement over its predecessor and it had a soldered heatspreader, allowing for efficient cooling and great overclocking. Even the "locked" version could be overclocked through the multiplier within (quite reasonable) limits.

 

-Apple iPad Pro - [5/10]

Spoiler

A pretty good product, sunk by its price (plus the extra cost of the physical keyboard and the pencil). Buy it if you don't mind the Apple tax and are looking for a very light office machine with an excellent digitizer. Particularly good for rich students. Bad for cheap tinkerers like myself.

 

 

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1 hour ago, trag1c said:

Oh really so there are notable/large projects moving over. This is more tempting to join the bandwagon now.

The whole Gnome project is now on gitlab. And gimp is now under the gnome repo on gitlab. All though not completely related to the topic since Gnome wasn't really on github in the first place. But it most certainly have a positive effect on the hype of  #movingtogitlab. 

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2 hours ago, mr moose said:

It's this "fuck MS" and "I'm moving" before the dust has even settled rhetoric that is not healthy, that's just a knee jerk reaction based on internet rhetoric/idealogs. [...] and it will certainly never work for individuals. 

And it's that mentality that keeps people using services they despise. As a business, by all means keep using a service if it makes you money, but as an individual? If you disagree with a company and what it does you should do what's in your power to avoid using their services.

 

I stopped using GitHub due to the buyout. That's not out of fear that they'll mess with my projects. That's not out of fear that they'll abuse the platform. It's because as a user I really have 0 ties to the platform, I don't agree with Microsoft's principles, and I don't want my money going to support anything they do.

 

As an individual by all means choose the services you use on the basis of your ideology.

 

Much of the open source community disagrees with Microsoft's business practices. Much of the open source community doesn't wish to support them. And much of the open source community is community driven by individuals, not major companies. As such it feels more than a little disingenuous to characterize it as (paraphrased) "Oh they should have stayed on a platform who's money now goes to a company they disagree with. It's just a gut reaction and they're overreacting".

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