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Posted · Original PosterOP

So i've never bought a car and also know nothing about them and was wondering how much one should spend on their first car. Btw I live in Australia :) 

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18 minutes ago, Sfeta3 said:

So i've never bought a car and also know nothing about them and was wondering how much one should spend on their first car. Btw I live in Australia :) 

Well that entirely depends on your specific needs and what you can afford, factoring in registration and insurance costs as well.

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3 hours ago, Sfeta3 said:

So i've never bought a car and also know nothing about them and was wondering how much one should spend on their first car. Btw I live in Australia :) 

For reference:

 

My first car was "free" (Dad gave it to me at no cost), but it was dead, and needed an engine replacement. The deal was, I got the car for free if I paid to have it fixed. Total cost: $1800 CAD. The car was a 1999 Buick Regal (This was back in like 2010), and it had over 250,000 KM on it. The engine crapped out again, and was replaced a second time for another cost of $1500 CAD or so. I ended up selling the car for scrap around 2013 or so.

 

My second car is my current car: 2014 VW Jetta (purchased brand new) - cost was in the neighbourhood of $27,000 CAD - it currently has about 95,000 KM on it (had 45 KM when I pulled it off the lot).

 

Now, how much you spend on your first car largely depends on:

1. Your income (specifically disposable income)

2. Your budget (how much can you put towards a car)

3. Your needs (what is the car for? Work? School? Fun? etc)

 

For your first car, I would avoid buying new. I would also avoid buying fancy. Don't go out and get a sports car, etc. I'd suggest a practical, mid-size or compact 4-door sedan. Get it from a company with a good reputation, like Toyota, Honda, VW, even Subaru, etc. Get one that is between 6-8 years old, if you can afford. Try to find one with lower KM - under 200,000 KM for sure. Under 150,000 KM preferred. If you can find a good deal under 100,000 KM, that's ideal.

 

I assume you don't get snow in the winter? If you do, make sure to buy actual real Winter Tires (a good investment is a second set of Rims for them as well) - if you don't get snow, then don't worry about winter tires.

 

When choosing what models to consider:

1. check fuel efficiency (L/100KM (lower is better) or MPG (higher is better) - find a car with better efficiency - over 24 MPG or under 10L/100KM combined HW + City driving)

2. Price for regular service (Oil + Filter change - full inspection - don't just get an oil change without an inspection - I also recommend following the manufacturers maintenance guide)

3. Cost of common parts (brake pads, rotors, spark plugs, headlights, etc)

4. Storage capacity/interior room (How much space do you need? How many passengers? How much luggage or other items?)

5. Type of vehicle (Hatchback vs trunk? SUV/Truck vs Car?) - Try to keep this practical. If you don't need a truck or SUV, don't get one. A Hatch or Sedan will be much cheaper to fuel and maintain

6. Other considerations you might have (eg: necessity of AWD/4x4, etc)

7. "Luxury" features (Automatic transmission, AC, heated seats/steering wheel, Bluetooth, hands free calling, power windows, etc)


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Almost exactly like Dalekphalm said. Except I would be okay with an over ten-year-old car since they're actually in a good budget range to give a teenager. New cars are expensive to buy and expensive to ensure, so I would not recommend one for a new driver.


My first car (I got a month ago :) ) is a Honda Civic Si coupe from 2006. I $5000 out of pocket for the car, and it has less than 150,000 miles (low miles for a car more than ten years old.) Good gas mileage and relatively cheap to maintain. I've already been driving for around three years, so I wanted something a little sporty to call my own, but nothing all that fast. It's been a great car for a month.


One thing I can definitely recommend is getting a car and maintaining it yourself for a first car. Learn how to change your oil, learn how to replace bulbs, learn how to change your own tires in case you get a flat on the road. Even simple stuff like learning how to clean the interior and exterior of your car by yourself. When I bought my car I detailed the inside, and I really appreciate cleaning and taking care of my car more.

 

I can also recommend learning how to drive a manual transmission car while learning how to drive. It really helps you understand how a car works and how the engine and transmission drive a car. But, unless you're buying it for fun, I recommend owning an automatic transmission car, since they're easier to drive. In America most cars are automatics, but lots of Europe is still on manuals.

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My first car was a '51 Plymouth Cambridge. I bought in '69 for $85 (plus $1 interest; I was a starving college student and had to get a loan from the school to buy it).


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13 hours ago, Sfeta3 said:

So i've never bought a car and also know nothing about them and was wondering how much one should spend on their first car. Btw I live in Australia :) 

You can find some vehicles that are $500 and will last.

I've had countless $500 vehicles that lasted.

 

But people are lazy and dont want to do that.


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Posted · Original PosterOP
12 hours ago, dalekphalm said:

For reference:

 

My first car was "free" (Dad gave it to me at no cost), but it was dead, and needed an engine replacement. The deal was, I got the car for free if I paid to have it fixed. Total cost: $1800 CAD. The car was a 1999 Buick Regal (This was back in like 2010), and it had over 250,000 KM on it. The engine crapped out again, and was replaced a second time for another cost of $1500 CAD or so. I ended up selling the car for scrap around 2013 or so.

 

My second car is my current car: 2014 VW Jetta (purchased brand new) - cost was in the neighbourhood of $27,000 CAD - it currently has about 95,000 KM on it (had 45 KM when I pulled it off the lot).

 

Now, how much you spend on your first car largely depends on:

1. Your income (specifically disposable income)

2. Your budget (how much can you put towards a car)

3. Your needs (what is the car for? Work? School? Fun? etc)

 

For your first car, I would avoid buying new. I would also avoid buying fancy. Don't go out and get a sports car, etc. I'd suggest a practical, mid-size or compact 4-door sedan. Get it from a company with a good reputation, like Toyota, Honda, VW, even Subaru, etc. Get one that is between 6-8 years old, if you can afford. Try to find one with lower KM - under 200,000 KM for sure. Under 150,000 KM preferred. If you can find a good deal under 100,000 KM, that's ideal.

 

I assume you don't get snow in the winter? If you do, make sure to buy actual real Winter Tires (a good investment is a second set of Rims for them as well) - if you don't get snow, then don't worry about winter tires.

 

When choosing what models to consider:

1. check fuel efficiency (L/100KM (lower is better) or MPG (higher is better) - find a car with better efficiency - over 24 MPG or under 10L/100KM combined HW + City driving)

2. Price for regular service (Oil + Filter change - full inspection - don't just get an oil change without an inspection - I also recommend following the manufacturers maintenance guide)

3. Cost of common parts (brake pads, rotors, spark plugs, headlights, etc)

4. Storage capacity/interior room (How much space do you need? How many passengers? How much luggage or other items?)

5. Type of vehicle (Hatchback vs trunk? SUV/Truck vs Car?) - Try to keep this practical. If you don't need a truck or SUV, don't get one. A Hatch or Sedan will be much cheaper to fuel and maintain

6. Other considerations you might have (eg: necessity of AWD/4x4, etc)

7. "Luxury" features (Automatic transmission, AC, heated seats/steering wheel, Bluetooth, hands free calling, power windows, etc)

Thanks this is a massive help

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Posted · Original PosterOP
9 hours ago, Kobathor said:

Almost exactly like Dalekphalm said. Except I would be okay with an over ten-year-old car since they're actually in a good budget range to give a teenager. New cars are expensive to buy and expensive to ensure, so I would not recommend one for a new driver.


My first car (I got a month ago :) ) is a Honda Civic Si coupe from 2006. I $5000 out of pocket for the car, and it has less than 150,000 miles (low miles for a car more than ten years old.) Good gas mileage and relatively cheap to maintain. I've already been driving for around three years, so I wanted something a little sporty to call my own, but nothing all that fast. It's been a great car for a month.

 

I was talking about this to my friends and I said 'How much should you spend on your first car like $5,000' and they looked at me like I was mad but it sounds like you got a great car

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I can't really add much to what others have said, but here goes, 

It might be personal prejudice or something but I don't think new drivers should have a vehicle that is younger then them, so if you were born in 2002 get something from the nineties, really only you can know what you need, will you just be driving you and maybe some friends around? Car, will you ever need to haul a load of lumber? Light pickup.


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I wouldn't spend much over 1500 US in my area, but I would spend over 1200, typically under that is pretty bad. That price would be a bit higher out of my local area, we have a cheap used market. I would also expect that would be higher in Australia, so idk if that would be much help. 

What you need to do is keep an eye on what prices look like for perfectly running old common cars and go from there. Do go much lower, there's typically a price floor for a driveable car with little or no problems, and you find a lot of cars withing a couple hundred dollars of that. Also, I would expect older asian cars to cost more and sell faster, in my area there even hard to get sometimes despite living in an area with a larger market. 

Also, check out the tires and factor that in your cost. We have a harsh winter though, and replacing bad tires before winter is a must here. 


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I had saved up 2500 for my first car and ended up picking up a 2000 mercury cougar. Man that thing was lame but I loved it, had it for about 10 years before I scrapped it and bought my current car.

 

I'd say the biggest factor is budget. How much are you earning a month and how much of a down payment could you currently put down?

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41 minutes ago, NinJake said:

I had saved up 2500 for my first car and ended up picking up a 2000 mercury cougar. Man that thing was lame but I loved it, had it for about 10 years before I scrapped it and bought my current car.

 

I'd say the biggest factor is budget. How much are you earning a month and how much of a down payment could you currently put down?

Plus if the car is under, say, $4000-8000, saving up and buying cash is better for younger people.


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On 5/15/2018 at 11:09 AM, dalekphalm said:

 

I assume you don't get snow in the winter? If you do, make sure to buy actual real Winter Tires (a good investment is a second set of Rims for them as well) - if you don't get snow, then don't worry about winter tires.

 

@Sfeta3

I will add that something I've learned is that where it snows regularly, the cities are excellent at cleaning it up and salting the roads.

What that means is that, unless a storm comes and the snow is just building up uncontrollably on the ground, snow tires are not neccessary.

 

So for me, who uses a car while on campus to go get groceries, or to go out once in a while, I will not be taking snow tires; and if it's snowing heavily that day, then I do not go out.

 

 

Obviously your situation may be different, you may not be able to just choose to not go out, just some input


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3 minutes ago, GSTARR said:

@Sfeta3

I will add that something I've learned is that where it snows regularly, the cities are excellent at cleaning it up and salting the roads.

What that means is that, unless a storm comes and the snow is just building up uncontrollably on the ground, snow tires are not neccessary.

 

So for me, who uses a car while on campus to go get groceries, or to go out once in a while, I will not be taking snow tires; and if it's snowing heavily that day, then I do not go out.

 

 

Obviously your situation may be different, you may not be able to just choose to not go out, just some input

In Texas, that might be true - but largely I cannot agree with that advice.

 

Snow tires aren't just about snow traction. The actual materials used in Winter vs Summer tires are different. Summer Tires become stiff and lose traction in cold weather - even if it's a perfectly dry road with zero snow, ice, or water.

 

At around 7C (~45F), the tire hardens, and you will not be stopping as fast as you're used to:

https://www.thestar.com/autos/2014/11/19/at_7c_its_time_to_put_on_those_winter_tires.html

 

So assuming Texas doesn't get regularly below 45F? Sure, don't bother with snow tires. But if it does, I'd highly suggest investing in a set, for your own safety.


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What's going to kill you isn't the cost of the car (though it could if you go absolutely nuts). What is going to kill you is most likely the cost of insurance if you haven't had many years of experience behind the wheel.


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Back in High School (so around 4 years ago) my Dad managed to find a 2001 Kia Rio for $1200, and even though I grew to hate that car and it's lack of air conditioning, it probably couldn't have been better for a first car. It never had any major mechanical issues and it never left me stranded. It was simple enough to where my Dad and I could do 90% of the repair jobs ourselves. I don't know if they have them in Australia but try looking for cars like, a 2005 Kia Spectre or even a 2000's Ford Escort ZX2, I don't think you guys have road salt over there so cars should last a lot longer than over here in New England.


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57 minutes ago, dalekphalm said:

In Texas, that might be true - but largely I cannot agree with that advice.

 

-snip-

 

1 hour ago, GSTARR said:

What that means is that, unless a storm comes and the snow is just building up uncontrollably on the ground, snow tires are not neccessary.

 

All seasons are "OK" tires to use for someone like me in Wisconsin. You do not need Summer tires AND Winter tires, however... I plan on getting some summer rims and with those I'll toss on some summer performance tires.

 

But going back to a first car deal... depends on where you live. If you dont have much money, all seasons are fine. Just get a car and stay safe!

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3 hours ago, dalekphalm said:

In Texas, that might be true - but largely I cannot agree with that advice.

 

Snow tires aren't just about snow traction. The actual materials used in Winter vs Summer tires are different. Summer Tires become stiff and lose traction in cold weather - even if it's a perfectly dry road with zero snow, ice, or water.

 

At around 7C (~45F), the tire hardens, and you will not be stopping as fast as you're used to:

https://www.thestar.com/autos/2014/11/19/at_7c_its_time_to_put_on_those_winter_tires.html

 

So assuming Texas doesn't get regularly below 45F? Sure, don't bother with snow tires. But if it does, I'd highly suggest investing in a set, for your own safety.

I go to school in pennsylvania, Erie


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16 hours ago, Sfeta3 said:

I was talking about this to my friends and I said 'How much should you spend on your first car like $5,000' and they looked at me like I was mad but it sounds like you got a great car

Most people either spend way more or way less. Some of my friends have new cars (expensive) and one of my friends has a '99 Civic LX. Everybody is different.

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27 minutes ago, GSTARR said:

I go to school in pennsylvania, Erie

Okay - that's even worse than Texas. I just looked up average temperature data by month, and December averages a high of 45F (which is the point at which All-Season tires have reduced stopping power). It looks like January and February are both within that range too. Meaning that 3 months of the year, your car is more dangerous to drive in (eg: having to make an emergency stop with little warning).

 

So while getting Winter Tires can seem expensive, it's your own safety (and those you share the road with) at stake.

 

Plus, your winter tires will last for ages if you only use them 3 months a year, and your all-season tires will also last longer, since they'll get a 3-month break each year.

 

Obviously I can't forcibly change your mind - but I do recommend that you look into it and at least consider the safety aspect.


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4 hours ago, dalekphalm said:

So assuming Texas doesn't get regularly below 45F? Sure, don't bother with snow tires. But if it does, I'd highly suggest investing in a set, for your own safety.

The average lowest temperature in my town is 36, but that's overnight when you probably aren't driving. During the day in the winter it's usually around 50 or higher :( 

 

I'm probably gonna get summer tires and use em all year round, this last winter we only had one week where it was below 30.

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18 hours ago, Sfeta3 said:

How much should you spend on your first car

well your first car should be no damage coverage, so $500-$1500 at most.

A good mechanic lookover and a ugly rusted out p.o.s. will be great value, plus you save money on insurance.

I would be freaked out with a $5000 vehicle with no loss or damage coverage.


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1 hour ago, dalekphalm said:

Okay - that's even worse than Texas. I just looked up average temperature data by month, and December averages a high of 45F (which is the point at which All-Season tires have reduced stopping power). It looks like January and February are both within that range too. Meaning that 3 months of the year, your car is more dangerous to drive in (eg: having to make an emergency stop with little warning).

 

So while getting Winter Tires can seem expensive, it's your own safety (and those you share the road with) at stake.

 

Plus, your winter tires will last for ages if you only use them 3 months a year, and your all-season tires will also last longer, since they'll get a 3-month break each year.

 

Obviously I can't forcibly change your mind - but I do recommend that you look into it and at least consider the safety aspect.

Edit: I just misread your comment entirely

 

Instead of arguing a different point, you looked at 2 years worth of experience and called it lucky

Incredible


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2 hours ago, GSTARR said:

Edit: I just misread your comment entirely

 

Instead of arguing a different point, you looked at 2 years worth of experience and called it lucky

Incredible

Let's be clear, everyone is lucky that they don't get into accidents. Yes, skill most definitely mitigates the risk, and being cautious, but things can happen that you can't plan for - a deer jumps out, an old man trips off the sidewalk, another driver doesn't look and crashes into you, etc.

 

All I'm saying is that by driving in 45F or lower conditions with all-season tires, you are at a measurable disadvantage. You are in more danger, even if you can mitigate that danger by, say, driving very defensively, staying very far back from other traffic, driving below the speed limit, etc.

 

You can justify it by saying you've never had an accident, but that's not the point. As long as you acknowledge that all-season tires are more dangerous in cold conditions (regardless of the presence of snow), then I guess there's nothing more to discuss about it. It just annoys me when people drive using all-seasons thinking they're just as effective as the summertime simply because there's no snow on the ground.


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