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Yoyohoneywasp

Overclocking *RISKY*?

Overclocking your monitor is pretty similar to overclocking a CPU or GPU fundamentally.  There are logic transistors in the scaler chip that need to keep up with the signal being fed to it.  There are also transistors that will drive the pixels to the value they need to hold.  The scaler and panel have an inherent limit to how fast they can go to keep up.  You will start seeing artifacts or the monitor won't be able to hold a picture if you try to push it too far, but this is not because your monitor is being damaged, it's because it can't keep up.  The only way to get transistors to keep up with a faster clock is to increase the voltage (this is what you do when you overclock a CPU or GPU core).  Only excess voltage will harm your monitor, any artifacting due to OC should be cured with a power cycle to reset all the logic at worst.  There is no way to increase the voltage to your monitor's circuitry, so there is no way to overpower and therefore damage your monitor.

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You don't run any risk to your monitor overclocking it.  The scaler chip and panel will either keep up or it won't.  You're not changing any operating voltages or anything that would be damaging to the panel.

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I'm a owner of a Dell S2417DG and I have been running this monitor for 6 months at 165Hz OC, and 1ms response time, and I haven't seen any damage or difference whatsoever. But I'm just talking of personal experience. since I dont know what monitor you wanna try OC. It might be risky, but I suggest you to try it for really short period of time, and if you see any particular change roll back instantly.

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Linus anwers it in this video from long ago, not sure how valid it is now since people have done it more since Titans launch 

 

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2 hours ago, Yoyohoneywasp said:

Is overclocking a monitor really risky and can it ruin the monitor after a couple months?

i leave mine [PG279Q] at 165hz all day whether i'm gaming or just browsing the internet. no harm, been 10 months already since xD


CPU: Intel Core i7-7700K | Motherboard: ASUS ROG STRIX Z270H | Graphics Card: ASUS ROG STRIX GTX 1080 Ti OCEdition | RAM: 16GB G.Skill Ripjaws V 3000MHz |Storage: 1 x Samsung 830 EVO Series 250GB | 1 x Western Digital Blue 7200rpm 1TB | PSU: Corsair RM750x 750W 80+ Gold Power Supply | Case: Cooler Master MasterCase 5 Pro |

Cooling: Corsair H100i v2 // 4x Corsair ML140 RED Fans // 2x Corsair ML120 RED Fans 
---

Monitor: ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q 1440p 165Hz IPS G-Sync | Keyboard: Corsair K70 LUX Red LED, Cherry MX Brown Switches | Mouse: Logitech G600 MMO Gaming Mouse | Speakers: Logitech Z623 THX Certified Speakers

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Posted · Best Answer

Overclocking your monitor is pretty similar to overclocking a CPU or GPU fundamentally.  There are logic transistors in the scaler chip that need to keep up with the signal being fed to it.  There are also transistors that will drive the pixels to the value they need to hold.  The scaler and panel have an inherent limit to how fast they can go to keep up.  You will start seeing artifacts or the monitor won't be able to hold a picture if you try to push it too far, but this is not because your monitor is being damaged, it's because it can't keep up.  The only way to get transistors to keep up with a faster clock is to increase the voltage (this is what you do when you overclock a CPU or GPU core).  Only excess voltage will harm your monitor, any artifacting due to OC should be cured with a power cycle to reset all the logic at worst.  There is no way to increase the voltage to your monitor's circuitry, so there is no way to overpower and therefore damage your monitor.

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