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HeavyBlurrySoul

Compact description for intel processors

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Posted (edited) · Original PosterOP

I was thinking about the Intel naming scheme and told myself that there should be a better way to get a more informative name for every Intel CPU.
I opened the notes app on my phone (memo) to write down some ideas and concepts.

After 15 to 30 minutes of brainstorming, I came up with the following idea:

 

[generation]-[Number of cores][Hyperthreading][unlocked][platform][basefrequency][maxturbofrequency]

e.g. i7-7700k = 7/4HUD4.2-4.5

 

The Generation and Number of cores are separated to keep it sustainable after 82 generations. (I know that it's ridiculous.)

After looking at this for 5 minutes I decided to make an application that does it for you.

 

prompt.get(['generation', 'corecount', 'hyperthreading', 'unlocked', 'platform', 'basefrequency', 'maxturbofrequency'], function (err, result) {
    var generation = result.generation;
    var corecount = result.corecount;
    if (result.hyperthreading.toLowerCase() == 'y') {
        var hyperthreading = 'H';
    } else if (result.hyperthreading.toLowerCase() == 'n') {
        var hyperthreading = '';
    } else {
        var hyperthreading = '*';
    };

    if (result.unlocked.toLowerCase() == 'y') {
        var unlocked = 'U';
    } else if (result.unlocked.toLowerCase() == 'n') {
        var unlocked = '';
    } else {
        var unlocked = '*';
    };

    if (result.platform.toLowerCase() == 'desktop') {
        var platform = 'D';
    } else if (result.platform.toLowerCase() == 'mobile') {
        var platform = 'M';
    } else if (result.platform.toLowerCase() == 'embedded') {
        var platform ='E'
    } else {
        var platform = '*';
    };

    var basefrequency = result.basefrequency;
    var maxturbofrequency = result.maxturbofrequency;
    console.log(`${generation}/${corecount}${hyperthreading}${unlocked}${platform}${basefrequency}-${maxturbofrequency}`);
    console.log(`If you see any * then double check your inputs.`);

    while (1 == 1) {

    }

});

The executables are attached to the post.

 

Though it's not perfect, it's a better way to name a Cpu if you want to know more about it by just looking at the name.

I'm planning on adding more features to differentiate the different classes etc. 

 

Cheers,

Dylan

 

 

app-macos.rar

app-win.rar

Edited by HeavyBlurrySoul
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18 minutes ago, HeavyBlurrySoul said:

i7-7700k = 7-4HUD4.2

       i3-4130   = 4-HD3.4

I doubt my 70 year old granpap can understand that

It's a lot harder then telling hime to buy the one with the bigger numbers


My life

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The naming scheme atm needs to be able to tell layman buyers - such as most people - the rough performance of their potential purchase. i3, i5 and i7 have become synonymous with "cheap/office", "performance", and "high end", with i9 being so new as to not really have ingrained in the mindset of most people yet, but it's a logical step "above" the level of an i7.

 

Something like CPU-Z which gives incredible detail on basically every aspect of cpu specification would likely be a better fit for people who need to know a lot more about their purchase. A system like the one your program outputs would give marginally more information than the current codenames for people who need it (though not a lot in the grand scheme of things), but would confuse the hell out of most people who just need to now a basic "Product A vs Product B" comparison. 

 

On a tangential sidenote, a naming scheme where you need to look up the definition for each part of the scheme to be able to compare them is probably worse than just being able to read the specs individually, especially if you have to go and look it up anyway.

 

Still, stick with it. Some other features that may need to be factored include memory support (capacity/speed), version/specs of iGPU, and total QPI/PCIE links supported.

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Rocking a 7-4HUD4.2 doesn't roll as good of the tongue as having a 7700k though :P marketability is important as well. Besides, the core counts are relatively simple already where i3, i5 and i7 were(are) dual (quad) core, quad (hexa) core no HT, quad (hexa) core with HT. The mobile section is also split into T and U, for example, for "low" and "ultra low" power. So you'd need to add that as well.

For more information you'd check the product page or Ark.


Crystal: CPU: i7 7700K | Motherboard: Asus ROG Strix Z270F | RAM: GSkill 16 GB@3200MHz | GPU: Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti FE | Case: Corsair Crystal 570X (black) | Storage: 250 GB Crucial BX100 SSD + 2 TB Seagate HDD + 1TB WD Green + 3TB WD Red | PSU: EVGA Supernova G2 1000W | Monitor: Asus VG248QE 24"

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99 Percent of people really only care about i3, i5 or i7. (if that)

 

Anyone who's really into tech, like people here on the forum have no problem understanding which CPU is which I think. 

Intel's naming scheme isn't amazing, but more elegant than gibberish like 7-4HUD4.2. Props for writing an app though!

 

(and to be honest, the chipset naming scheme is far more confusing to me)


Does you mum know you're here?

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I wouldn't use the term baseclock. "default/factory clock" would be much, much better.

 

Baseclock is something else entirely.


Intel Core i7 5820K 4.7GHz 1.28V | Watercool MO-RA3 420 LC | ASUS RVE | Trident Z 3200MHz 4x4GB | GTX 980 K|NGP|N 2-Way SLi

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7 minutes ago, DildorTheDecent said:

I wouldn't use the term baseclock. "default/factory clock" would be much, much better.

 

Baseclock is something else entirely.

Intel call it "Processor Base Frequency" so it isn't far off.


Main rig: Asus Maximus VIII Hero, i7-6700k stock, Noctua D14, G.Skill Ripjaws V 3200 2x8GB, Gigabyte Windforce 980Ti, Corsair HX750i, In Win 303 NVIDIA, Samsung SM951 512GB, WD Blue 1TB, HP LP2475W 1200p wide gamut

Gaming system: Asrock Z370 Pro4, i7-8086k stock, Noctua D15, G.Skill TridentZ 3000C14 2x8GB, Asus 1080 Ti Strix OC, Fractal Edison 550W PSU, Corsair 600C, Optane 900p 280GB, Crucial MX200 1TB, Sandisk 960GB, Acer Predator XB241YU 1440p 144Hz G-sync

Ryzen rig: Asrock B450 ITX, R5 2600, Noctua D9L, Corsair Vengeance LPX 3000 2x4GB, Vega 56, Corsair CX450M, NZXT Manta, Crucial MX300 525GB, Acer RT280K

VR rig: Asus Z170I Pro Gaming, i7-6600k stock, Silverstone TD03-E, Kingston Hyper-X 2666 2x8GB, Zotac 1070 FE, Corsair CX450M, Silverstone SG13, Samsung PM951 256GB, HTC Vive

Gaming laptop: Asus FX503VD, i5-7300HQ, 2x8GB DDR4, GTX 1050, Sandisk 256GB SSD

Total CPU heating: i7-7800X, 2x i7-6700k, i7-6700HQ, i5-6600k, i5-5675C, i5-4570S, i3-8350k, i3-6100, i3-4360, 2x i3-4150T, E5-2683v3, 2x E5-2650, R7 1700, 1600

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Posted · Original PosterOP

The point of this is to tell more about the cpu and not as a replacement to the intel names, and yes i7-7700k sounds way better than 7-4HUD4.2.
It's more of a summary then a convential name, but what does i7-7700k tell you, that you can overclock it.

 

@DildorTheDecent

 

Capture.PNG

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2 minutes ago, HeavyBlurrySoul said:

The point of this is to tell more about the cpu and not as a replacement to the intel names, and yes i7-7700k sounds way better than 7-4HUD4.2.
It's more of a summary then a convential name, but what does i7-7700k tell you, that you can overclock it.

i7 = high end consumer CPU

7 = 7th gen

700 = marketing where big number is good

k = unlocked

 

So your idea is basically to have a compact descriptor? Why not turbo clock too? I think it should be included, if not the full turbo table.


Main rig: Asus Maximus VIII Hero, i7-6700k stock, Noctua D14, G.Skill Ripjaws V 3200 2x8GB, Gigabyte Windforce 980Ti, Corsair HX750i, In Win 303 NVIDIA, Samsung SM951 512GB, WD Blue 1TB, HP LP2475W 1200p wide gamut

Gaming system: Asrock Z370 Pro4, i7-8086k stock, Noctua D15, G.Skill TridentZ 3000C14 2x8GB, Asus 1080 Ti Strix OC, Fractal Edison 550W PSU, Corsair 600C, Optane 900p 280GB, Crucial MX200 1TB, Sandisk 960GB, Acer Predator XB241YU 1440p 144Hz G-sync

Ryzen rig: Asrock B450 ITX, R5 2600, Noctua D9L, Corsair Vengeance LPX 3000 2x4GB, Vega 56, Corsair CX450M, NZXT Manta, Crucial MX300 525GB, Acer RT280K

VR rig: Asus Z170I Pro Gaming, i7-6600k stock, Silverstone TD03-E, Kingston Hyper-X 2666 2x8GB, Zotac 1070 FE, Corsair CX450M, Silverstone SG13, Samsung PM951 256GB, HTC Vive

Gaming laptop: Asus FX503VD, i5-7300HQ, 2x8GB DDR4, GTX 1050, Sandisk 256GB SSD

Total CPU heating: i7-7800X, 2x i7-6700k, i7-6700HQ, i5-6600k, i5-5675C, i5-4570S, i3-8350k, i3-6100, i3-4360, 2x i3-4150T, E5-2683v3, 2x E5-2650, R7 1700, 1600

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8 minutes ago, porina said:

 

 

3 minutes ago, HeavyBlurrySoul said:

 

Base frequency and baseclock are not the same.

 

Baseclock is bus speed (100MHz, stock). Base frequency is the operating speed of the processor. In the case of the 8700K: 100 * 37 = 3700MHz. That's the BCLK * core ratio = base frequency.

 

image.png.d18df5a62b7db866af2b17dae417acfb.png Too many noobs are going to end up entering the wrong thing because "the BIOS says different"


Intel Core i7 5820K 4.7GHz 1.28V | Watercool MO-RA3 420 LC | ASUS RVE | Trident Z 3200MHz 4x4GB | GTX 980 K|NGP|N 2-Way SLi

Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge Black 32GB | Exynos 8890 Octa | SanDisk Ultra 200GB SDXC

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Valley | Superposition

 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
4 minutes ago, DildorTheDecent said:

 

Base frequency and baseclock are not the same.

 

Baseclock is bus speed (100MHz, stock). Base frequency is the operating speed of the processor. In the case of the 8700K: 100 * 37 = 3700MHz. That's the BCLK * core ratio = base frequency.

 

image.png.d18df5a62b7db866af2b17dae417acfb.png Too many noobs are going to end up entering the wrong thing because "the BIOS says different"

I realized that and I already changed it, thanks for the remark.

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3 minutes ago, DildorTheDecent said:

Base frequency and baseclock are not the same.

You are correct, the best kind of correct - is what you might hear if you lived in Futurama's world.

 

In common usage, if I were to say the base clock of a random CPU was say 3.6 GHz, you'd know what I mean. More importantly, it isn't BCLK. Outside of some overclockers, does anyone even care about BCLK?


Main rig: Asus Maximus VIII Hero, i7-6700k stock, Noctua D14, G.Skill Ripjaws V 3200 2x8GB, Gigabyte Windforce 980Ti, Corsair HX750i, In Win 303 NVIDIA, Samsung SM951 512GB, WD Blue 1TB, HP LP2475W 1200p wide gamut

Gaming system: Asrock Z370 Pro4, i7-8086k stock, Noctua D15, G.Skill TridentZ 3000C14 2x8GB, Asus 1080 Ti Strix OC, Fractal Edison 550W PSU, Corsair 600C, Optane 900p 280GB, Crucial MX200 1TB, Sandisk 960GB, Acer Predator XB241YU 1440p 144Hz G-sync

Ryzen rig: Asrock B450 ITX, R5 2600, Noctua D9L, Corsair Vengeance LPX 3000 2x4GB, Vega 56, Corsair CX450M, NZXT Manta, Crucial MX300 525GB, Acer RT280K

VR rig: Asus Z170I Pro Gaming, i7-6600k stock, Silverstone TD03-E, Kingston Hyper-X 2666 2x8GB, Zotac 1070 FE, Corsair CX450M, Silverstone SG13, Samsung PM951 256GB, HTC Vive

Gaming laptop: Asus FX503VD, i5-7300HQ, 2x8GB DDR4, GTX 1050, Sandisk 256GB SSD

Total CPU heating: i7-7800X, 2x i7-6700k, i7-6700HQ, i5-6600k, i5-5675C, i5-4570S, i3-8350k, i3-6100, i3-4360, 2x i3-4150T, E5-2683v3, 2x E5-2650, R7 1700, 1600

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1 hour ago, porina said:

You are correct, the best kind of correct - is what you might hear if you lived in Futurama's world.

 

In common usage, if I were to say the base clock of a random CPU was say 3.6 GHz, you'd know what I mean. More importantly, it isn't BCLK. Outside of some overclockers, does anyone even care about BCLK?

What if BCLK doesn't mean "base clock" but "bus clock"? Since historically the CPU frequency was based on the FSB speed times a multiplier.

 

Or is there documentation that actually says it's called "base clock"?

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I really have to disagree here. Adding technical jargon to the SKU without context isn't going to help anyone except enthusiasts, and enthusiasts are already smart enough to look up specs.

 

EDIT: Your scheme also gives exactly zero information for compatible platforms, like for example the socket. 5960X is Haswell-E, technically part of 4th gen but is grouped with 5th gen due to release dates. That and it's an entirely different socket from the mainstream part of both generations.


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Main Rig: Intel i7-7700K 5GHz | Gigabyte Z170N | EVGA 1080 ACX 3.0 SC | 16GB Trident Z 3200MHz | 256GB 840 EVO | 960GB Corsair Force LE | EVGA P2 650W | Custom Loop

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