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Dawson Wehage

The Types and Tiers of Hard Disk Drives for Consumers

Message me for anything I should edit or add to tiers or make new tiers. Please try and keep these drives at a consumer level or anything used for a NAS.

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Tier 1

-WD Gold Enterprise (Used in NAS devices)

 

-WD VelociRaptor (Built for gaming, not commonly used due to it's small capacity)

 

-Seagate IronWolf NAS (Can be used for storing games and files if you don't own a NAS but require a large amount of storage, could receive long warranty due to the fact that these hold a large amount of data)

 

-Toshiba X300 (Good drive, bad warranty)

 

-WD Black (Receive your best performance in games for a decent price, recommend for a high budget build)

 

-Seagate Barracuda Pro (On the same scale as the IronWolf but with longer warranty, a little more pricier) 

 

-WD Red (A reliable drive, but only runs at 5400RPM unless you upgrade to the Red Pro or IronWolf)

 

-WD Red Pro (Good overall performance, optimized for a NAS, Top-end capacity could be higher)

Tier 2

-Seagate Firecuda Desktop/Mobile (Includes SSD NAND Flash for faster speeds, not recommended if you tend to do a lot of writing with the drive)

 

-WD Blue Desktop (A good reliable drive that has been used for many years, recommended when sticking to a budget)

 

-Seagate Barracuda (A good reliable drive that has been used for many years, recommended when sticking to a budget)

 

-Hitachi Deskstar 7K3000 (Good drive, could improve on power consumption and warranty)

 

-WD Mainstream (Basically a re-branded WD Blue but with RPMs that vary)

 

-Seagate Constellation ES.2 (Long warranty with a high capacity, weak performance of the 3TB Constellation ES.2 SAS drive)

 

-Toshiba P300 (Good drive, not much else to say)

Tier 3

-WD RE3 (Mainly a enterprise drive, but it's good in consumer devices. Has had issues with read/write speeds)

 

-Hitachi Deskstar 7K2000 (Decent performace for a good value, not as fast as some competition)

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

What to look for in buying a Hard Drive:

- Review the item before buying it instantly

 

- Pricing is a big factor in this, make sure you don't overpay, ask a forum community for information

 

- Try to buy a drive over 1TB storage if you plan to use this for large files and games. (Games range anywhere from 2GB to 100GB Average, so you would want to make sure you will have a large drive for your games)

 

- Don't buy used! You never know if the drive has been dropped, damaged, worn out. Drives are cheap at your nearest computer store most of the time

 

- Keep your receipts if your drive is defective (People like to throw out there receipts before they get home and test it, ends up being fried)

 

- Don't leave consumer drives or your computer on 24/7 if you aren't using it for any specific purposes, your drive hours will decrease and it will be a waste)

 

- Consider if you want to buy a large capacity Solid State Drive or Hard Disk Drive. Some people have it in there budget.

 

- Be aware of the type of interface, whether it's 3.5" or 2.5". You will mainly see 5.25" for DVD/CD Drives or Add-ons for the front of your PC.

 

- Don't buy a External Hard Disk Drive, these aren't meant to game of them, and you will more then likely experience stuttering because you are running this through a USB, and are more so for accessing files on the go.


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View my Hard Drive Tier and Review list here

 

Specs:
Core i5 8400

Corsair Vengeance 2x8GB 2400MHz

Gigabyte AORUS Gaming Ultra Z370

NVIDIA GTX 1060 6GB

Samsung 850 EVO 256GB Solid State Drive

Seagate FireCuda 2TB Hybrid

EVGA SuperNOVA G3 550W PSU

Phanteks P300 Tempered Glass Case

CoolerMaster Lite L RGB

Corsair Glaive RGB

ACER Predator XB1 4K Monitor from LMG

NZXT Hue+ 3 Pack 120AER RGB Fans

 

Server:

Intel Xeon E5645 @ 2.4GHz (2 CPUs)

Nvidia Geforce 210

16GB DDR3 ECC Memory

1 2TB WD RED NAS Drive

2x 128GB SSD's

6x 1TB WD Enterprise Drives

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Posted · Original PosterOP · Best Answer

Message me for anything I should edit or add to tiers or make new tiers. Please try and keep these drives at a consumer level or anything used for a NAS.


Post Cursed Images HERE

View my Hard Drive Tier and Review list here

 

Specs:
Core i5 8400

Corsair Vengeance 2x8GB 2400MHz

Gigabyte AORUS Gaming Ultra Z370

NVIDIA GTX 1060 6GB

Samsung 850 EVO 256GB Solid State Drive

Seagate FireCuda 2TB Hybrid

EVGA SuperNOVA G3 550W PSU

Phanteks P300 Tempered Glass Case

CoolerMaster Lite L RGB

Corsair Glaive RGB

ACER Predator XB1 4K Monitor from LMG

NZXT Hue+ 3 Pack 120AER RGB Fans

 

Server:

Intel Xeon E5645 @ 2.4GHz (2 CPUs)

Nvidia Geforce 210

16GB DDR3 ECC Memory

1 2TB WD RED NAS Drive

2x 128GB SSD's

6x 1TB WD Enterprise Drives

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5 hours ago, Being Delirious said:

Message me for anything I should edit or add to tiers or make new tiers. Please try and keep these drives at a consumer level or anything used for a NAS.

The HGST Deskstar NAS line should 100% be Tier 1. Yes it has higher power consumption. BUT it is more power efficient by being FAR faster than competing consumer nas drives. Also yeah. The dynamic between HGST/WD/Hitachi drives should probably be addressed. Because HGST HE drives are the same as WD Gold etc etc.

6TB comparison

RAID-5 Resync Energy Consumption

4TB comparison

RAID-5 Resync Energy Consumption

 

 


LINK-> Kurald Galain:  The Night Eternal 

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CPU: Xeon E3-1231v3  // Cooling: Noctua L9x65 //  Mobo: AsRock E3C224D2I // Ram: 16GB Kingston ECC DDR3-1333

HDDs: 4x HGST Deskstar NAS 3TB  // PSU: EVGA 650GQ // Case: Fractal Design Node 304 // OS: FreeNAS

 

 

 

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Speed of a drive makes no difference these days. It’s mostly up to the controller and how aggressively it conserves power.


Cor Caeruleus Reborn v6

Spoiler

CPU: Intel - Core i7-8700K

CPU Cooler: be quiet! - PURE ROCK 
Thermal Compound: Arctic Silver - 5 High-Density Polysynthetic Silver 3.5g Thermal Paste 
Motherboard: ASRock Z370 Extreme4
Memory: G.Skill TridentZ RGB 2x8GB 3200/14
Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 500GB 2.5" Solid State Drive 
Storage: Samsung - 960 EVO 500GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive
Storage: Western Digital - Blue 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive
Storage: Western Digital - BLACK SERIES 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive
Video Card: EVGA - 970 SSC ACX (1080 is in RMA)
Case: Fractal Design - Define R5 w/Window (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA P2 750W with CableMod blue/black Pro Series
Optical Drive: LG - WH16NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer 
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit and Linux Mint Serena
Keyboard: Logitech - G910 Orion Spectrum RGB Wired Gaming Keyboard
Mouse: Logitech - G502 Wired Optical Mouse
Headphones: Logitech - G430 7.1 Channel  Headset
Speakers: Logitech - Z506 155W 5.1ch Speakers

 

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I would add the HGST Ultrastar disks to tier 1, and the Toshiba DT01ACA300 to tier 2. Those Toshiba disks are rebadged Hitachi ones and they give incredible value for file storage.

I do think you might need to revise your buying tips.
For example, do you have any proof that more drive hours will reduce the lifespan of the disk? It is usually the power on and power off cycle that has impact on that.
I also don't see how semi-annual/annual reinstalls of the OS would increase the lifespan of the disk. This might even achieve the opposite, since a lot of data is written to the disk when you reinstall your OS.

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