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tikker

Pump speed based on water temperature

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Posted · Original PosterOP

At the moment pump speed and fan speed is all determined by CPU temperature (I think, using AI Suite 3).

Is it useful to use water temperature as an indicator so I don't kill the pump with heat for example?

What would be the easiest way to achieve this? I have a temperature sensor in the loop connected to my motherboard.


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Yes, you can have that temperature sensor and then take that as reference for the pump speed


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1 minute ago, tikker said:

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Since you have an ASUS board, this is super easy. You just have to change the temp source of the fans to T_sensor1 (or 2), whichever one you have the 2-pin temp probe connected to.

 

Pump speed has minimal impact on performance, so I would set it to the highest rpm that doesnt bother you sound size and leave it at is constant regardless of the temperature (my D5 is 35% constant, for example).

 

The idea is to have the fluid temps to maintain well below 60 degrees (max rating for a D5 pump, for example) and so I would draw a custom fan curve that peaks slowly between for example 35 and 55 degrees for hte water temperature.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
8 minutes ago, For Science! said:

Since you have an ASUS board, this is super easy. You just have to change the temp source of the fans to T_sensor1 (or 2), whichever one you have the 2-pin temp probe connected to.

 

Pump speed has minimal impact on performance, so I would set it to the highest rpm that doesnt bother you sound size and leave it at is constant regardless of the temperature (my D5 is 35% constant, for example).

 

The idea is to have the fluid temps to maintain well below 60 degrees (max rating for a D5 pump, for example) and so I would draw a custom fan curve that peaks slowly between for example 35 and 55 degrees for hte water temperature.

Yeah it's 40% constant now.

Should I change this in the BIOS or is there a setting in AI Suite? I've changed the threshold for the 2 pin sensor to 40C, but I'm not sure when/what that will trigger.

 

[Edit] never mind. It doesn't have an option to change the source for the pump header...


Crystal: CPU: i7 7700K | Motherboard: Asus ROG Strix Z270F | RAM: GSkill 16 GB@3200MHz | GPU: Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti FE | Case: Corsair Crystal 570X (black) | Storage: 250 GB Crucial BX100 SSD + 2 TB Seagate HDD + 1TB WD Green + 3TB WD Red | PSU: EVGA Supernova G2 1000W | Monitor: Asus VG248QE 24"

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Just now, tikker said:

Yeah it's 40% constant now.

Should I change this in the BIOS or is there a setting in AI Suite? I've changed the threshold for the 2 pin sensor to 40C, but I'm not sure when/what that will trigger.

Not sure what you mean by 2-pin sensor threshold (it should just be reading the temps).

 

Whether you do it in the BIOS or AIsuite is up to you. I actually do both. The BIOS settings are good to have if you aren't using windows for example (I do heavy scientific calculations in Linux). But the AI suite lets you bypass things like the 75 degree - 100% fan speed limit.

 

So I have the parameters plugged in on both interfaces.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
2 minutes ago, For Science! said:

Not sure what you mean by 2-pin sensor threshold (it should just be reading the temps).

 

Whether you do it in the BIOS or AIsuite is up to you. I actually do both. The BIOS settings are good to have if you aren't using windows for example (I do heavy scientific calculations in Linux). But the AI suite lets you bypass things like the 75 degree - 100% fan speed limit.

 

So I have the parameters plugged in on both interfaces.

Ah ok. In the settings in the bottom bar of Fan Expert there are options for the thresholds for each temperature probe. Anyway, for some reason Asus decided to let you choose a temperature source for everything except the pump header, so I'm out of luck that way I guess.

I'll check the BIOS, and otherwise just leave it.


Crystal: CPU: i7 7700K | Motherboard: Asus ROG Strix Z270F | RAM: GSkill 16 GB@3200MHz | GPU: Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti FE | Case: Corsair Crystal 570X (black) | Storage: 250 GB Crucial BX100 SSD + 2 TB Seagate HDD + 1TB WD Green + 3TB WD Red | PSU: EVGA Supernova G2 1000W | Monitor: Asus VG248QE 24"

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You can set this up very easily using SpeedFan by simply setting up a 'fan-curve' for the pump based on the temperature of your sensor.

 

ONLY RELEVANT IF YOU'RE USING HARDLINE TUBING: The only consideration I would keep in mind, is if you are using hardline PETG, the hotter the temperature of your liquid, the greater the risk you have of your tubing softening, compressing and popping out of a fitting. It's happened to me before where failing to set my SpeedFan back to automatic from manual (fans were barely spinning under full load) meant that the liquid heated up and one of the tubes popped out. If your coolant for some reason reaches a very high temperature, by having a curve like you're suggesting set up, you are increasing the pump's speed at the most vulnerable time for something like this to occur. The added momentum that the liquid will carry as the pump speeds up will increase the risk of a tube coming out. The pump speeding up also won't decrease temperatures if the liquid isn't being cooled. For this reason I would set up a maximum temperature on the liquid (from your sensor) as well, so that if your radiator fans were to stop spinning for some reason, and the liquid were to heat up, you'd be aware of it and/or your system would shut down.


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Posted · Original PosterOP
19 hours ago, AperumDesign said:

You can set this up very easily using SpeedFan by simply setting up a 'fan-curve' for the pump based on the temperature of your sensor.

 

ONLY RELEVANT IF YOU'RE USING HARDLINE TUBING: The only consideration I would keep in mind, is if you are using hardline PETG, the hotter the temperature of your liquid, the greater the risk you have of your tubing softening, compressing and popping out of a fitting. It's happened to me before where failing to set my SpeedFan back to automatic from manual (fans were barely spinning under full load) meant that the liquid heated up and one of the tubes popped out. If your coolant for some reason reaches a very high temperature, by having a curve like you're suggesting set up, you are increasing the pump's speed at the most vulnerable time for something like this to occur. The added momentum that the liquid will carry as the pump speeds up will increase the risk of a tube coming out. The pump speeding up also won't decrease temperatures if the liquid isn't being cooled. For this reason I would set up a maximum temperature on the liquid (from your sensor) as well, so that if your radiator fans were to stop spinning for some reason, and the liquid were to heat up, you'd be aware of it and/or your system would shut down.

Realy? Never heard of that happening. I doubt that'll be a problem though, since my water temperature never gets near the glassing temperature of PETG .


Crystal: CPU: i7 7700K | Motherboard: Asus ROG Strix Z270F | RAM: GSkill 16 GB@3200MHz | GPU: Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti FE | Case: Corsair Crystal 570X (black) | Storage: 250 GB Crucial BX100 SSD + 2 TB Seagate HDD + 1TB WD Green + 3TB WD Red | PSU: EVGA Supernova G2 1000W | Monitor: Asus VG248QE 24"

Laptop: Dell XPS 13 9360 | CPU: i5 7200U | RAM: 8 GB

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2 hours ago, tikker said:

Realy? Never heard of that happening. I doubt that'll be a problem though, since my water temperature never gets near the glassing temperature of PETG .

My CPU/GPU were sitting at roughly 75-85 degrees since the fans were only just spinning. When I realised this was happening, I ramped my pump and fans up and the PETG was clearly slightly softened where the compression fittings had literally made the PETG shrink in radii inside the fittings, causing the first 90 degree bend of tubing to come out of the fitting. This does occur with PETG if the water temperature gets too high, although it will only happen if something unusual occurs like in my case. Just a consideration so that if you do use SpeedFan, keep the fans on Automatic in case you forget to turn them back up.


Case Design | CAD | Custom Watercooling Parts | Loop Design | Cable Sleeving and Management 

Fittings Guide  |  Most recent completed build: Glass & Aluminium  |  Current build(s): Project Starscream

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2 hours ago, tikker said:

Realy? Never heard of that happening. I doubt that'll be a problem though, since my water temperature never gets near the glassing temperature of PETG .

Ive seen this happen only in a few cases such as in SFF cases where they didn't include enough radiator space and/or airflow. At these temps where the PETG starts to warp, you are most likely killing the pump too.

 

If you set a sensible fan curve based on water temperatures, this will never happen. 

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