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a7mddiaa

what do i need to learn to become a full stack web developer

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Posted · Original PosterOP

i am starting to learn web development so it would be helpful to know what stuff should i learn and to know if i can use an ipad pro for that

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HTML & CSS are a good start for front end. 

I think a website class may help you a bit. I don't know much about backend but HTML and CSS are good start points for front end. I doubt anyone will argue against it. 
They're not really "Languages" per say as many may argue. They're fancy syntax that help make text look good in the smallest possible file they could manage. 

 

May be somewhat incorrect but:

If you want to do more backend, SQL, and then literally any language should be good. C, Python, Java, 


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Start with the smaller things, which will already consume a lot of time.

HTML / CSS / JavaScript (Which is a pain in the ass IMO).

 

Do a little back-end again many great choices, PHP / Python / .NET / Ruby / NodeJS

 

Interactive pages are "the thing" the problem is more that you can choose out of 3 million libs for the same freaking thing.

I highly avoid interactive pages but I totally see the use for them, I just find Javascript so damn annoying.

 

 

After that most people don't but I do suggest the following, You have written crappy code now for a long time.

Read a book or some course about proper code structure, or step into a Framework and learn new features you can use for your own.

 

 

Sources that ain't a pain to watch and scare you

 

 

 

This is a video more about it ain't easy in the end of the day. won't say you much now but still a great talk

 


Quote or mention me if not feel ignored 

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HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to start. You can get pretty far on those three alone due to Node.JS providing enough back-end stuff to get you going. And then there's the fun of all the frameworks and sublanguages and whatever like SASS/LESS for CSS and AngularJS for client-side JavaScript.

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As others have said start small. Web languages are a great way to introduce yourself to coding, they are free form and interpreted, meaning they can be messy and you dont need to compile your code every time you want to see if the thing you changed worked. I personally started out trying to copy the design of a website (business ones are usually great to begin with, because there mainly text and images but often have some tricky formatting that takes a while to get perfect). After that do the same website again but make it dynamic so it scales with window size and works on all displays. After youve done that a few times you may be getting a bit tired of it, so start thinking about javascript (i know this is a bit old now but jQuery imo is still a great way to start) and try to make you website do some cool animations or stuff like that. Then finally start to look into PHP, SQL etc how can you make your website functional and do things. You'll find by then end you will have a website that works, but the code will be a god awful mess. This is when you need to consolidate what you've done. As others have said learn coding standards and be strict with yourself to add comments etc, It sounds silly but getting a job as a developer can often be the difference between clean code and messy stuff. Once you've watch some stuff on coding standards and how to keep code clean, re-write the same site again, make it perfect, make the SQL as efficient as you can. Then repeat. It will take time, and sometimes you wont feel like getting home and doing code, my advice dont... Do it when you feel motivated to do so, and make sure you always end your coding sessions on a succes (dont leave a piece of code broken because your stuck on it, you wont want to return to it EVER). The only other thing i would say is as you advance i would definately recommend playing with strict format complied languages, they will really force you to learn clean code and can often be transferred into web stuff.

 

Good luck !!


C

Intel

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I started out with HTML/CSS, it’s pretty much the only option for web front end, and is an intro to some basic concepts. After you’ve got that down try to make it dynamic with a back end, I’d recommend PHP/MySQL. 

 

I’d advise staying away from [insertNameHere].js and JavaScript in general, you can end up having them pile up to the point where you’re drowning in frameworks all doing the same thing.

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Posted · Original PosterOP

thank you all guys

my course started today

i already know html and css 

and am learning python and java script

but i have a question

i saw performance comparison between c++ and python i know this is high level and this is low level but will this affect websites performance ?

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55 minutes ago, a7mddiaa said:

i saw performance comparison between c++

Generally, one would not use C++ to write a webserver (although it can be), so in this scenario the answer is "C++ performance does not affect the performance of a website because it's not used". 

In more general terms, python is slower than C++ because of the way that python works "under the hood".

 

55 minutes ago, a7mddiaa said:

and what are uses of terminal when there is a gui

Terminal for what purpose? Like, a command line or a console app?


I will never succumb to the New Cult and I reject the leadership of @Aelar_Nailo and his wicked parrot armies led by @FakeCIA and @DildorTheDecent. I will keep my eyes pure and remain dedicated to the path of the One True; IlLinusNati

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21 hours ago, Cruorzy said:

JavaScript (Which is a pain in the ass IMO).

Care to elaborate? Learning JavaScript basically lets you build from the front end to the end using a MEAN (mango express angular node) stack. 

 

Do it daily as a job and I have never found JavaScript a pain in the ass


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1 hour ago, vorticalbox said:

Care to elaborate? Learning JavaScript basically lets you build from the front end to the end using a MEAN (mango express angular node) stack. 

 

Do it daily as a job and I have never found JavaScript a pain in the ass

Kind of a shitty line written by me, as mainly focusing on PHP and needed some interactive pages i felt the need to step into a nice and clean way of writing just a bit of JS.

My first experience was that there are plenty of way to do it which ain't bad at all but a bit unfriendly for a newcomer.

 

Reading up to some articles of JS libs and such kind of made it worse, all those libs with the same functionality becomes confusing till you get a decent grip of the language.

 

That is personally my experience so far, I maybe want to get more into Vue.js. Could you advice me resources or a path to get a good grip on the basics


Quote or mention me if not feel ignored 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
13 hours ago, straight_stewie said:

Generally, one would not use C++ to write a webserver (although it can be), so in this scenario the answer is "C++ performance does not affect the performance of a website because it's not used". 

In more general terms, python is slower than C++ because of the way that python works "under the hood".

 

Terminal for what purpose? Like, a command line or a console app?

ye the terminal like y would u use start for example when u can open the file with gui

and what other languages can be used instead of python?

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Posted · Original PosterOP
On 1/24/2018 at 11:12 AM, Cruorzy said:

Start with the smaller things, which will already consume a lot of time.

HTML / CSS / JavaScript (Which is a pain in the ass IMO).

 

Do a little back-end again many great choices, PHP / Python / .NET / Ruby / NodeJS

 

Interactive pages are "the thing" the problem is more that you can choose out of 3 million libs for the same freaking thing.

I highly avoid interactive pages but I totally see the use for them, I just find Javascript so damn annoying.

 

 

After that most people don't but I do suggest the following, You have written crappy code now for a long time.

Read a book or some course about proper code structure, or step into a Framework and learn new features you can use for your own.

 

 

Sources that ain't a pain to watch and scare you

 

 

 

This is a video more about it ain't easy in the end of the day. won't say you much now but still a great talk

 

i ve watched the video it really helped thanks

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42 minutes ago, a7mddiaa said:

ye the terminal like y would u use start for example when u can open the file with gui

and what other languages can be used instead of python?

In windows? The only real reason to use command prompt that I can see is if you're running a batch file to do a bunch of repetitive tasks for you.

In Linux/Mac? Because the terminal is so much more powerful than the gui. 


I will never succumb to the New Cult and I reject the leadership of @Aelar_Nailo and his wicked parrot armies led by @FakeCIA and @DildorTheDecent. I will keep my eyes pure and remain dedicated to the path of the One True; IlLinusNati

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10 minutes ago, straight_stewie said:

In windows? The only real reason to use command prompt that I can see is if you're running a batch file to do a bunch of repetitive tasks for you.

I disagree. If you limit the abilities of Windows's command shell to running batch files, that is not Windows's fault at all.


Write in C.

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5 minutes ago, Dat Guy said:

I disagree. If you limit the abilities of Windows's command shell to running batch files, that is not Windows's fault at all.

It clearly has other capabilities than that. 

However, there seems to be a way to not have to use the command prompt for almost all things in Windows.


I will never succumb to the New Cult and I reject the leadership of @Aelar_Nailo and his wicked parrot armies led by @FakeCIA and @DildorTheDecent. I will keep my eyes pure and remain dedicated to the path of the One True; IlLinusNati

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No, you won't be learning much on an iPad Pro.

 

My best advice would be to not only learn how to write code. Cover these areas too:

  • Code standards - Learn what good code is and stick to it
  • Frameworks - Don't try reinventing the wheel. Cover front-end and back-end
  • Databases - You need somewhere to store data. Look at query optimisation & replication
  • Linux - You're going to be connecting to a Linux server using SSH at some point
  • Security - Do not forget this! Know how to write secure code, stay up to date on the OWASP Top 10 and use Encryption where necessary
  • Software Development Methodologies
  • Software Development Life Cycyle
  • Testing - Unit & Functional
  • Continuous Automation / Delivery / Deployment
  • Version Control - Git
  • Other Standards - e.g PHP-FIG PSRs

When I'm interviewing software engineers the last thing on my mind is your ability to write code, that will be done with a test. If you can't show me you know to a decent level at least a good proportion of the points above (especially security) then it's hard to offer a position.

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On 26.1.2018 at 8:55 PM, Brenz said:

No, you won't be learning much on an iPad Pro.

 

My best advice would be to not only learn how to write code. Cover these areas too:

  • Code standards - Learn what good code is and stick to it
  • Frameworks - Don't try reinventing the wheel. Cover front-end and back-end
  • Databases - You need somewhere to store data. Look at query optimisation & replication
  • Linux - You're going to be connecting to a Linux server using SSH at some point
  • Security - Do not forget this! Know how to write secure code, stay up to date on the OWASP Top 10 and use Encryption where necessary
  • Software Development Methodologies
  • Software Development Life Cycyle
  • Testing - Unit & Functional
  • Continuous Automation / Delivery / Deployment
  • Version Control - Git
  • Other Standards - e.g PHP-FIG PSRs

When I'm interviewing software engineers the last thing on my mind is your ability to write code, that will be done with a test. If you can't show me you know to a decent level at least a good proportion of the points above (especially security) then it's hard to offer a position.

^This. There's far more to programming than just being the scriptmonkey and writing code. Yes, you might be done with a combination of HTML/CSS & JavaScript for front-end work, SQL and at least one of [Java/Python/Go/JavaScript/C#] for BackEnd work and at least one of the forementioned for the middleware (Web- / Applicationserver), but that's only the language itself you have to express the logic in. That logic is almost universally the same for every language - but you need to know it and how it is implemented in and affected by the language itself. When it comes to that I'd even argue that you do not really know HTML / CSS until you also know a language to manipulate it at runtime - like JavaScript - and thatfor can apply common patterns, practices and principles to your HTML / CSS, which in most cases isn't powerful enough to do that on it's own.

Think of the languages more of a medium you express solutions in rather than your go-to solution itself.

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