Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
marcintosch

i9-7980XE: Overclocked to run all 18 cores beyond 6 GHz

Recommended Posts

1 minute ago, Dylanc1500 said:

I knew about them but they never actually have any in stock. Plus they haven't shown what kind of life cycle they have (that I'm aware of).

I'd rather have a manual loop

 


.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Dylanc1500 said:

Still have an issue with wasting ln2 though, but I remember seeing it.

Cascade phase change would be my choice for this kind of thing. Then you're wasting electricity with the cost possibly equal to losing 100% of the ln2 though.


.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In all sorts of industries, tech gets pushed to its absolute limits.. and this is actually useful information when developing the next generation of products. 

We see that an 18 core CPU and run at 6GHz, but you may say it’s “unreasonable”, this shows the current architecture CAN do it, and is limited by tempature. If this CPU was made on a more power efficient process, you could actually see these clocks on an 18 core in more “normal” conditions (in the future of course)

Also CPU manufacturers give these people unreleased CPUs to test for a reason. Pushing it to its limits brings out the weaknesses and also strengths of an architecture that aren’t as apparent under normal conditions

 

its like asking why BMW tests cars on professional race tracks when almost no one who buys one is going to. Or why Bugatti wanted to put 1000hp in a car when there was only one specific track where it could ALMOST hit its top speed


  

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, zberry7 said:

In all sorts of industries, tech gets pushed to its absolute limits.. and this is actually useful information when developing the next generation of products. 

We see that an 18 core CPU and run at 6GHz, but you may say it’s “unreasonable”, this shows the current architecture CAN do it, and is limited by tempature. If this CPU was made on a more power efficient process, you could actually see these clocks on an 18 core in more “normal” conditions (in the future of course)

Also CPU manufacturers give these people unreleased CPUs to test for a reason. Pushing it to its limits brings out the weaknesses and also strengths of an architecture that aren’t as apparent under normal conditions

 

its like asking why BMW tests cars on professional race tracks when almost no one who buys one is going to. Or why Bugatti wanted to put 1000hp in a car when there was only one specific track where it could ALMOST hit its top speed

LN2 is not a "resonable" operating condition, is the problem.  Material properties all change at temperatures that low and will never  be replicated under real world testing conditions.  You can't simply say "oh well it means you can get 6Ghz if heat is not the issue".  On my 7700K I was slamming 1.75V through it, not thermal throttling, and I couldn't get it to post at 5.6Ghz when it'll do way beyond that on LN2.  I was doing it with direct die 1 degree C water.


Workstation: 9900KF @ 5.0Ghz || ASRock Z390 Taichi Ultimate || Gigabyte 1080Ti || G.Skill DDR4-3800 @ 3600 4x8GB || Corsair AX1500i || 11 gallon whole-house loop.

LANRig/GuestGamingBox: 8600K@ 4.9Ghz || Gigabyte Z270 Gaming 9  || EVGA Titan X (Maxwell) || Corsair SF600 || CPU+GPU watercooled 280 rad push only.

Server Router (Untangle): 8350K @ 4.7Ghz || ASRock Z370 ITX || 2x8GB || PicoPSU 250W, running on AX1200i from Server Storage || CPU watercooled, 11 gallon whole-house loop.

Server VM/Plex/HTTPS: E5-2699v4 (22 core!) || Asus X99m WS || GT 630 || Corsair RM650x || CPU watercooled, 11 gallon whole-house loop.

Server Storage: Pent. G3220 || Z87 Gryphon mATX || || LSI 9280i + Adaptec + Intel Expander || 4x10TB Seagate Enterprise Raid 6, 3x8TB Seagate Archive Backup, Corsair AX1200i (drives) Corsair RM450 (machine) || CPU watercooled, 11 gallon whole-house loop.

Laptop: HP Elitebook 840 G3 (Intel 8350U).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×