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Ken7331

Custom sleeving wire gauge question

5 minutes ago, Ken7331 said:

So there's no fuctional purpose to them using different gauges for the double wires? Is that just for fitting the wires into the connectors? 

Double wires are mainly for sense wires to monitoring voltage so they don't need to be the same gauge. For double wires to get a clean look you can always do this and have it done midsplice to hide the tangle of wires. 

 

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Posted · Original PosterOP

I am in the process of creating custom sleeved cables for my evga 850 g2 and I have been searching everywhere for the answer to this question with no success.

 

Some of the double wires for the 24 pin power connector are 18 awg and some are 22. I thought I remember at some point reading something about the psu using the difference in resistance of the two differently gauged wires to monitor/regulate voltage. Will using different or even all the same gauge wire affect this? I have a ton of 16 gauge wire and just ordered some 18 and 22 just in case I need to replicate it exactly however I'd rather use the thicker gauge wire if it will be better (even just theoretically I know the difference probably wouldn't be noticeable in real world performance). 

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4 minutes ago, Ken7331 said:

I am in the process of creating custom sleeved cables for my evga 850 g2 and I have been searching everywhere for the answer to this question with no success.

 

Some of the double wires for the 24 pin power connector are 18 awg and some are 22. I thought I remember at some point reading something about the psu using the difference in resistance of the two differently gauged wires to monitor/regulate voltage. Will using different or even all the same gauge wire affect this? I have a ton of 16 gauge wire and just ordered some 18 and 22 just in case I need to replicate it exactly however I'd rather use the thicker gauge wire if it will be better (even just theoretically I know the difference probably wouldn't be noticeable in real world performance). 

The standard is 18AWG wire, going larger to 16AWG isn't a problem but don't go smaller. Only thing with larger wires is making sure the sleeve is nice and tapered so it fits well into the connectors. 

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Posted · Original PosterOP

So there's no fuctional purpose to them using different gauges for the double wires? Is that just for fitting the wires into the connectors? 

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2 minutes ago, Ken7331 said:

So there's no fuctional purpose to them using different gauges for the double wires? Is that just for fitting the wires into the connectors? 

Quote so people can see you 

16 minutes ago, W-L said:

The standard is 18AWG wire, going larger to 16AWG isn't a problem but don't go smaller. Only thing with larger wires is making sure the sleeve is nice and tapered so it fits well into the connectors. 

Just in case you didn't see.


Want to custom loop?  Ask me more if you are curious

 

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Posted · Best Answer
5 minutes ago, Ken7331 said:

So there's no fuctional purpose to them using different gauges for the double wires? Is that just for fitting the wires into the connectors? 

Double wires are mainly for sense wires to monitoring voltage so they don't need to be the same gauge. For double wires to get a clean look you can always do this and have it done midsplice to hide the tangle of wires. 

 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
Just now, W-L said:

Double wires are mainly for sense wires to monitoring voltage so they don't need to be the same gauge. For double wires to get a clean look you can always do this and have it done midsplice to hide the tangle of wires. 

 

That's where my confusion was. From what I had read in a different thread it seemed to imply the psu utilizes the difference in resistance of the two wires for sensing. This lead me to believe it was maybe necessary to keep them different and that using the same gauge for both may somehow cause it not to sense properly. Thanks for the help. 

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1 minute ago, Ken7331 said:

That's where my confusion was. From what I had read in a different thread it seemed to imply the psu utilizes the difference in resistance of the two wires for sensing. This lead me to believe it was maybe necessary to keep them different and that using the same gauge for both may somehow cause it not to sense properly. Thanks for the help. 

I don't believe that would be it since the change in resistance would be so small between them. I haven't see any problems with doing the double wire method 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 hour ago, W-L said:

I don't believe that would be it since the change in resistance would be so small between them. I haven't see any problems with doing the double wire method 

I wasn't worried about the double wire method, my concern was whether it was necessary to use different gauge wires for the double wire. I didn't know if the psu required different gauges for there to be a difference in resistance to sense. It seems like if they were the same it would possibly cause issues with it sensing due to there being no resistance difference between the two wires.

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9 minutes ago, Ken7331 said:

I wasn't worried about the double wire method, my concern was whether it was necessary to use different gauge wires for the double wire. I didn't know if the psu required different gauges for there to be a difference in resistance to sense. It seems like if they were the same it would possibly cause issues with it sensing due to there being no resistance difference between the two wires.

Doing the double wire would change the length and the wire size so I don't believe that would be the method used to do the sensing. I do know that if you miss a sense wire though the PSU will not turn on from testing I did when I sleeved PSU's.

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