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Paula_The_Butter_Fairy

H100i V2 cable problems

12 minutes ago, Paula_The_Butter_Fairy said:

So i got the cpu pump into cpu fan header thing but the other two that appear to be fan headers are just that- fan headers.

yes those are for small form factor or cheap old motherboards, which do not have enough fan headers. you connect your pump to cpu header and connect your radiator fans to those headers. those are basically fan splitter. I wish they were modular.

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The cable for the pump should go into the CPU fan header, and the RGB cable should go to an RGB controller/header. Your manual should tell you which is which. 


 If you wanna discuss the X58 platform and get tips and advice: General X58 Xeon/i7 discussion. If you want to discuss old Star Wars games like Battlefront II and KOTOR, check out my thread: Anyone still playing old Star Wars games? 

 

Long live his RGBness, @Damascus! And Fractal Design/SeaSonic dude, @Ordinarily_Greater is awesome as well! Also the man who introduced me to the glorious XCMR, @WhisperingKnickers.

 

Laptop:

Spoiler

Clevo P750TM1-G
i7 8700K

16GB 2400MHz DDR4

GTX 1070

250GB 960 Evo, 2TB Seagate Firecuda, 1TB Seagate Barracuda Pro

Current Project PC

Spoiler

CPU: 2x Xeon X5675

CPU Cooler: Dual Cooler Master V6 GTs
Motherboard: EVGA SR-2
Memory: IDK yet

Storage: will figure something out

GPU: hopefully a Radeon VII
Case: Don't have one that supports HPTX yet
PSU: EVGA 1600W T2, CableMod Pro Carbon cables

Other project PC:

Spoiler

CPU: X56xx Xeon of some sort 

CPU Cooler: NH-D15S for now
Motherboard: EVGA Classified 4-Way SLI X58 motherboard
Memory: 

Storage: 
GPU: MSI Gaming X 1080 Ti 11G 
Case: 
PSU: EVGA 1000W G3

 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
Just now, Zando Bob said:

The cable for the pump should go into the CPU fan header, and the RGB cable should go to an RGB controller/header. Your manual should tell you which is which. 

THANKS SO MUCH i got refurbished so i didn't have a manual but thank you for being it for me!!!!!!!

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Just now, Paula_The_Butter_Fairy said:

THANKS SO MUCH i got refurbished so i didn't have a manual but thank you for being it for me!!!!!!!

You're welcome. Let me know if it doesn't work, since I've never used one. But as far as I know, it only has the RGB and pump cable actually on the AIO, and then the fans for the rad just plug into a normal fan header. I'll probs be getting an AIO or custom loop soonish, so I'll see how much I really know. 


 If you wanna discuss the X58 platform and get tips and advice: General X58 Xeon/i7 discussion. If you want to discuss old Star Wars games like Battlefront II and KOTOR, check out my thread: Anyone still playing old Star Wars games? 

 

Long live his RGBness, @Damascus! And Fractal Design/SeaSonic dude, @Ordinarily_Greater is awesome as well! Also the man who introduced me to the glorious XCMR, @WhisperingKnickers.

 

Laptop:

Spoiler

Clevo P750TM1-G
i7 8700K

16GB 2400MHz DDR4

GTX 1070

250GB 960 Evo, 2TB Seagate Firecuda, 1TB Seagate Barracuda Pro

Current Project PC

Spoiler

CPU: 2x Xeon X5675

CPU Cooler: Dual Cooler Master V6 GTs
Motherboard: EVGA SR-2
Memory: IDK yet

Storage: will figure something out

GPU: hopefully a Radeon VII
Case: Don't have one that supports HPTX yet
PSU: EVGA 1600W T2, CableMod Pro Carbon cables

Other project PC:

Spoiler

CPU: X56xx Xeon of some sort 

CPU Cooler: NH-D15S for now
Motherboard: EVGA Classified 4-Way SLI X58 motherboard
Memory: 

Storage: 
GPU: MSI Gaming X 1080 Ti 11G 
Case: 
PSU: EVGA 1000W G3

 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 minute ago, Zando Bob said:

You're welcome. Let me know if it doesn't work, since I've never used one. But as far as I know, it only has the RGB and pump cable actually on the AIO, and then the fans for the rad just plug into a normal fan header. I'll probs be getting an AIO or custom loop soonish, so I'll see how much I really know. 

So i got the cpu pump into cpu fan header thing but the other two that appear to be fan headers are just that- fan headers.

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Posted · Best Answer
12 minutes ago, Paula_The_Butter_Fairy said:

So i got the cpu pump into cpu fan header thing but the other two that appear to be fan headers are just that- fan headers.

yes those are for small form factor or cheap old motherboards, which do not have enough fan headers. you connect your pump to cpu header and connect your radiator fans to those headers. those are basically fan splitter. I wish they were modular.

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Sounds like its all sorted, but this is all you need to know for the H100i v2:

 

- USB cable goes into pump and connects to a USB2 header on the MoBo, required for profile control in Corsair Link and LEDs

- 2 PWM fan headers coming off the pump, you should plug your fans in here so they ramp according to water temperature

- 1 3-pin which should go into a DC header set at 100% all the time, typically you use the CPU_FAN1 header for this

 

Since this is a watercooler, you really want your fans to ramp up and down according to the coolant temperature and not the CPU temperature. The two are related, but it makes far more sense for your fans to be dictated by the water temps, since you may find that your fans ramp unnecessarily high if they are governed by the core temps.

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2 minutes ago, Sinole said:

yes those are for small form factor or cheap old motherboards, which do not have enough fan headers. you connect your pump to cpu header and connect your radiator fans to those headers. those are basically fan splitter. 

This is spot on! 

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2 minutes ago, Corsair Joseph said:

This is spot on! 

thanks joseph :) pleas ask corsair to make those modular, they are hard to manage when you dont use them xD

 

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6 minutes ago, Corsair Joseph said:

-snip-

 

3 minutes ago, Sinole said:

-snip-

 

Apologies for questioning (in particular to Joseph, industry affiliate) but do you not think it is actually better to plug the fans into the pump?

 

Say for example you have a CPU fan profile in the bios that ramps up between 40-75 degrees and say you fire up a program that puts a light load on your CPU, causing a momentary increase of core temps (1 minute, say) to 60 degrees. If your fans are plugged into the motherboard then during this period, the fans on the H100i V2 will ramp up to respond to this temperature increase on the cores. However, the water temperatures are unlikely to change by more than a degree during this period, and since it is the water temperature that ultimately dictates how much cooling you get (rather than the fan speed, which is cooling the water) and so you will not benefit from the increased noise from the fan.

 

The cooling performance of the H100i V2 will only start to degrade when the water temperatures creep up, and so that is really when you want the fans to creep up. I believe this is the design of the product and this is why I think it is actually much more effective to have the fans plugged into the pump itself and should not be perceived as simply extra headers to only be used if you don't have any motherboard ones, since there is no way to monitor the coolant temperature through the motherboard.

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@For Science! Your other post above was actually ideal for most set up. Many of us here use that same logic including myself. Have the fans react to the coolant's temp as oppose to the core temp. That way the rad fan's curve will have a smoother transition when ramping up or going down. I don't think any of us here want our fans to have a frantic behavior when your system is in use. 

 

In terms of having the fans on the mobo, that's really totally up to the user. There's a number of applications out there that you can use to control the fans via mobo fan header.  

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9 minutes ago, For Science! said:

 

Apologies for questioning (in particular to Joseph, industry affiliate) but do you not think it is actually better to plug the fans into the pump?

 

Say for example you have a CPU fan profile in the bios that ramps up between 40-75 degrees and say you fire up a program that puts a light load on your CPU, causing a momentary increase of core temps (1 minute, say) to 60 degrees. If your fans are plugged into the motherboard then during this period, the fans on the H100i V2 will ramp up to respond to this temperature increase on the cores. However, the water temperatures are unlikely to change by more than a degree during this period, and since it is the water temperature that ultimately dictates how much cooling you get (rather than the fan speed, which is cooling the water) and so you will not benefit from the increased noise from the fan.

 

The cooling performance of the H100i V2 will only start to degrade when the water temperatures creep up, and so that is really when you want the fans to creep up. I believe this is the design of the product and this is why I think it is actually much more effective to have the fans plugged into the pump itself and should not be perceived as simply extra headers to only be used if you don't have any motherboard ones, since there is no way to monitor the coolant temperature through the motherboard.

you might be right, but in my case corsair fans were too load and i had to create a fan curve that i liked. and i like to have 1 controller control all my fans so i never get negative pressure in my case. although i have that ramp up problem some times that cpu readings are wrong. if you don't like that forget fan curve and put your fan at a constant 1000 rpm quite and effective in most cases. 600 is more quite, but 1000 is conservative. 

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1 minute ago, Corsair Joseph said:

@For Science! Your other post above was actually ideal for most set up. Many of us here use that same logic including myself. Have the fans react to the coolant's temp as oppose to the core temp. That way the rad fan's curve will have a smoother transition when ramping up or going down. I don't think any of us here want our fans to have a frantic behavior when your system is in use. 

 

In terms of having the fans on the mobo, that's really totally up to the user. There's a number of applications out there that you can use to control the fans via mobo fan header.  

but how do you make fan curve on corsair link? it only has 2 profiles quite and performance in my experience.

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If one really wants the fans to react to core temps, but still make it sensible with respect to the coolant temperature, you can tweak BIOS setting for the fans to update their speed only so often. There was even a similar discussion with respect to this on Corsair's own forums: http://forum.corsair.com/v3/showthread.php?t=158192

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I had this problem (H100i V2) with Corsairs Link software. I thought one of my cores was getting a temp spike, and the fans would suddenly ramp up. This caused some wobble in the fan blades causing them to "chatter" as they came into contact with the radiator. I monitored my cpu via two other programs outside of Link, and they did not show this spike. The first thing I did was cut a gasket out of thermal gasket material. This was mainly to "seal" the fan housings to prevent air loss, and also to provide a little more clearance for the fan blades. This helped, and improved the amount of air being pushed through the radiator. Other problems with Link caused me to uninstall the software. I am now using the mobo fan software to set up my profiles, and I no longer have the ramp up problem. However, Q-fan (ASUS) didn't read the liquid temp. I solved this problem by connecting the pump to the Liquid Pump header instead of the CPU header (my mobo has 3 headers...CPU Optional, CPU, and Liquid Pump). Q-fan was then able to read liquid temps, and allows me to set up a different, rather aggresive profile that follows liquid temp, not CPU temp.

This is the first closed loop system I have used. I modded a few liquid cooling conglomerations back when they were completely DIY, and had some bad experiences with pump failures, and leaks, so I've been air-cooled for many years. I like pushing the limits with overclocking, so I would prefer liquid as long as I don't let the magic smoke out of any more mobo's/CPU's, rofl.

 


Best Excuses:

        #1(simple) "Well, I never liked that stupid thing anyway!"

        #2(complex) "Obviously there was a flaw in the material, probably due to the inadvertent introduction of contaminants during the manufacturing process."

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11 hours ago, Sinole said:

but how do you make fan curve on corsair link? it only has 2 profiles quite and performance in my experience.

 

Hey Sinole,

 

If you open the Corsair Link, you'll see in the section where it says H100i v2 and below you'll see 4 things: the temperature, fan speed, pump speed, and LED color. If you click on the Fan, you can click on the dropdown box for "mode" and will see there is a custom option. If you don't have a custom option, you may need to update your program, or this may be related to the fans being connected to the PWM headers that came with the radiator I suppose. Unless it's something else that's way out of what I'm thinking.


"I tried to set you free, you keep trying to rescue me, but you can't, tell a heart, when to start, how to beat....."

*Kina Grannis saved my life*

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4 hours ago, Hiitchy said:

 

Hey Sinole,

 

If you open the Corsair Link, you'll see in the section where it says H100i v2 and below you'll see 4 things: the temperature, fan speed, pump speed, and LED color. If you click on the Fan, you can click on the dropdown box for "mode" and will see there is a custom option. If you don't have a custom option, you may need to update your program, or this may be related to the fans being connected to the PWM headers that came with the radiator I suppose. Unless it's something else that's way out of what I'm thinking.

thanks

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