Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
LOST TALE

Im confused about dsiplay types, please help

Recommended Posts

Posted · Original PosterOP

It would be nice if someone could take some time to explain this to me.

 

So I know, plasma, LCD, LED, OLED.

 

But now comes TN, IPS and CRt... wtf.


CPU: Ryzen 2600 GPU: RX 580 RAM: ddr4 3000Mhz 2x8GB  MOBO: MSI B450-A PRO Display: 4K 60hz 34-60 freesync 10bit IPS.

Link to post
Share on other sites

IPS - In Plane Switching

 

used for eyefinity displays due to the large viewing angle, deep colours. have a 5MS delay. Unlike LCD's  that have around a 1MS delay... smaller viewing angle and the colours are worse (apparently)

 

CRT - Cathode Ray Tube

 

Not used today, remember those large TV's/ Monitors... the basically used a fast "gun" to fire particles at a layer of phosphorus at the back of the screen to create your image.


 

 

 
-------------------
|   DESKTOP    |
-------------------


Intel I7-6850K (4.4Ghz) MSI X99A Gaming Pro Carbon | Corsair Vengeance 32GB DDR4-3200mhz | x2 MSI Gaming 1080Ti  | EVGA Supernova G2 1050w 80+Gold | Samsung 950 Pro M.2 (512GB) + Samsung 850 Evo (1TB) | IN-WIN S-Frame (No. 263/500)

 
-------------------
|     SERVER     |
-------------------


X2 Intel Xeon E5-2670 (16 core 32 thread) | Intel S2600CPJ Motherboard | Samsung 128GB ECC DDDR3 1600Mhz (16 x 8GB )

LSI 9207-8I RAID Controller (IT mode) | X2 Intel 750W 80+ Platinum redundant PSU's | Lots of SSD's & HDD's!  | Intel P4000M series case.

 
------------------------
| NETWORKING LAB |
-------------------------


X2 CISCO 3845-MB ISR Routers | X3 CISCO 3560 24 port POE L3 switches | X2 CISCO 2811 ISR's | X2 CISCO 1841 ISR's 

Link to post
Share on other sites

IPS - good colors, around 5-8ms response time, up to 60Hz.

 

TN - dull colors, around 1ms response time, up to 144Hz.

 

CRT - cathode ray tube, not used anymore.


“I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.” - Martin Luther King Jr.


The Desktops

Main Rig: CPU: Intel Core i7-7700K | RAM: 16GB DDR4-2400 | Motherboard: Asus Strix Z270E | Storage: 1TB Samsung 970 EVO Plus, 2x1TB HDD | GPU: GTX 1080 Strix O8G

Cooling: Dual 240mm AIOs | Case: Fractal Design Meshify C (modified) | PSU: EVGA GS 550W

VR Rig: CPU: Intel Core i5-3570 | RAM: 8GB DDR3-1600 | Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3 | Storage: 256GB SSD + 750GB HDD | GPU: GTX 1060 6GB SSC Cooling: 92mm Tower Cooler Push/Pull | Case: Silverstone GD09B | PSU: Cooler Master Silent Pro M 700W | HMD: Oculus Rift CV1 with 2 sensors

Server: CPU: 2x Intel Xeon E5645 | RAM: 16GB DDR3-1333 ECC | Motherboard: Supermicro X8DAi | GPU: Sparkle GTX 550 Ti

Cooling: 92mm Tower Cooler, Zalman CNPS9900MAX-R | Storage: 1TB HDD | Case: Phanteks Enthoo Evolv ATX TG | PSU: Corsair CX550M

X230 Frankenstein | CPU: Intel Core i5-3210M | RAM: 8GB DDR3-1600 | Storage: 256GB SSD | GPU: Intel HD 4000 | Cooling: Cooler Master Hyper T2 (modified) | Case: Amazon 1A7 Cardboard Box


The Portables

Lenovo X230: CPU: Intel Core i5-3210M | RAM: 4GB DDR3-1600 | Storage: 128GB SSD | GPU: Intel HD 4000 | Lenovo 44+ 84Wh Battery

MacBook Air (Early 2015, A1466) 13": CPU: Intel Core i5-5250M | RAM: 4GB DDR3-1600 | Storage: 256GB SSD | GPU: Intel HD 6000

iPhone XS Max 64GB Space Grey | Apple Watch Series 2 42mm | AirPods (2nd Generation)

Link to post
Share on other sites

TN = response time+bad viewing angles

IPS = pretty colours+huge viewing angles 

CRT = im saving for a new monitor 


CPU: i5 3570K @4.5GHz    GPU: R9 290   MOBO: ASUS p8z77-v  RAM: 8Gb corsair vengence   CASE: ARC MIDI  PSU: XFX pro 550W  HDD: 2tb segate baracuda

Link to post
Share on other sites

CRT - cathode ray tube, not used anymore.

The question is, why would you NOT use it? 0ms response times, and are a hella lot more effective when dropped on someone's head.


"Say it, do it, preach it, shout it, but never, absolutely never, believe your own bullshit"   


Credited with the whole female avatar trend


Your thoughts here http://linustechtips.com/main/topic/67178-your-top-three/

Link to post
Share on other sites

LCD LED and OLED ARE PRETTY much a different version of the same thing

Btw it looks like @Glenwing is typing up an essay for you :P


<p>Wires Suck :angry:
!fY0|_|(4|\|R34[)7#!5PMM37#3(0[)3:1337 70833|\|73R3[)!|\|49!\/34\|/4Y 4|\|[)93741!f3

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

*ahem*

 

 

Doesn't hurt to know, though. 


LTTF Active Threads: Box Box Box - Project CARS & Assetto Corsa Players Club  | The Garage - Car Enthusiast Club

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 1700X + Corsair H110i GT GPU: EVGA GTX1080 SC MB: ASRock x470 Taichi RAM: Corsair Vengeance RGB DDR4-2666 16GB 

CASE: Fractal Design Define R5 STORAGE: Samsung 850 Evo 250GB + Intel 545s 512GB

Link to post
Share on other sites

CRT:

 

   Cathode Ray Tube.  I won't go into it much, but basically it has a glass panel with phosphors on it, and shoots beams at the panel that cause the phospors to light up and generate colored light.  This is what the really old TVs and monitors that were like a half meter thick were using.  They are obsolete now and are not widely produced anymore.

 

LCD:

 

   Liquid Crystal Display.  An LCD display has two parts, a transparent color filter (the LCD panel), and a light source behind it that shines through to illuminate it (the backlight).  It's a stained glass sort of idea.  The color filter is an array of tiny liquid crystals and it uses electrical currents to rotate them around, to bend and manipulate the light that passes through.  There are many variations and versions of this technology.  The backlight is always on and shines through the whole display, and cannot be blocked completely, so even when a part of the display is displaying black (where the crystals are rotated into a position that blocks the backlight from coming through), there is some light that bleeds through, giving it a white haze and relatively lower contrast than other types of TV.  It is still quite good though.  You may hear the term "TFT-LCD" which is just being more technical and specific, but you can basically ignore it, because all LCD TVs, monitors, phones, everything, they are all TFT-LCDs, people don't call it that anymore because it is implied.  Non-TFT-LCDs are like... digital watches and microwave clocks and stuff like that.

 

The Backlight can be either:

CCFL (Cold Cathode Fluorescent Light).  Original LCD TVs used this, there were no other types at the time so we just called them LCD TVs.  Since it uses fluorescent lights, it takes some time to warm up before it can display at maximum brightness.

LED (referred to as LED or LED-LCD).  More power efficient and thinner.  Instant full brightness capability at power-on.  Generally newer LCD TVs are this type.  So to be clear, "LED" TVs are a variation of LCD TVs.  LED and LCD TVs both use the same display technology (LCD), just a different lighting method.  Almost all LED LCD monitors and all TVs use WLED (white LED) as the backlight, although you may encounter monitors using RGB LEDs or GB LEDs w/ red phosphor as the backlight, which gets rid of the white haze and is used for extreme color accuracy.  These monitors are very expensive and are made for professionals that work with graphics and images where color accuracy is critical.

 

The LCD Panel which the light passes through, controls how it appears to the user, and it also has various types due to improvements and revisions over the years.

TN (Twisted Nematic) is a cheap generic type, inexpensive, but the colors wash out when viewed at an angle and the color reproduction is mediocre at best.  TN can be found on budget computer monitors.  It won't be found on TVs because the poor viewing angles make it almost useless.  If a monitor does not specify what type of panel it has, it is using TN.  If it uses an IPS or VA panel, that is a point of advertisement, and will be listed somewhere noticeable.  Some of the very highest quality TN panels have respectable color reproduction, and are used in premium "gamer" monitors because TN can switch colors faster than IPS or VA, giving it slightly smoother looking motion.  However, IPS is by no means "bad" for gaming as some people will tell you.

IPS (In-Plane Switching) uses an improved arrangement of the liquid crystals, and is a more common premium option, offering higher brightness, more vivid colors, deeper blacks than TN, and can be viewed from any angle without color shifts.  IPS is usually the preferred panel type.  High-end LCD TVs use these, for the wide viewing angles.  There are a lot of sub-variants of IPS as manufacturers make small improvements, so you will see things like eIPS, E-IPS, AH-IPS, P-IPS, S-IPS, PLS, Super PLS... All just IPS with minor adjustments and refinements.  All of them are good and they are all similar, so it's not worth paying much attention to.

VA (Vertical Alignment) is a less common display type, and it falls somewhat inbetween TN and IPS.  It has much better colors than TN, but not as good as IPS, viewing angles almost as good as IPS, and very deep blacks, better than IPS.  You may see "MVA" or "PVA" or "M-PVA" or "AMVA" monitors which are part of the VA family of panels.  Similar story to the different IPS variants.  Some people prefer VA panels over IPS for the deeper black capabilities.  They can be found in TVs more commonly than in monitors.

 

OLED:

 

   OLED (organic LED) is a very new display type, with great potential but some problems that still need to be solved.  OLED display technology is still in development.  As opposed to LCD, which uses a color filter, and a single light source from behind to illuminate it, OLED displays just have a giant grid of individual colored LEDs for every pixel.  Naturally, it is very expensive.  Since each OLED is individually controllable, the OLEDs can be turned off completely when they need to display black.  OLED displays have very deep black levels and excellent contrast (infinite contrast ratio, technically), as well as very vivid colors.  Current implementations tend to have oversaturated colors, but that will be solved with time as the technology matures and color calibration and balance improves.  OLEDs degrade in brightness over time.  The different color OLEDs degrade at different rates, so over several years, the color balance will be skewed.  Again, it is a developing technology, and research continues to be done to make more robust OLEDs that degrade slowly enough to not matter.  Because it no longer has two parts like LCD TVs do, and don't need a backlight, OLED TVs can be made extremely thin, and even flexible, using the right materials.  The power usage of OLED TVs varies wildly depending on what it is showing, if it is a dark scene where most of the OLEDs are off, the power is very very low, when it is showing white where all the OLEDs are active, it consumes 2 to 3 times the power of an LED LCD TV.  You may hear about "AMOLED" displays which means Active Matrix OLED.  This is just being redundant, because all OLED displays in TVs and monitors will be using an active matrix.  Passive matrices don't scale well to higher resolutions so aren't used for displays.  Similar to "TFT-LCD", you don't really need to put the "AM" in front of OLED because all OLED displays will be using an active matrix, so the "AM" is already implied, but vendors do it anyway to sound fancy.

 

Plasma:

 

  Plasma TVs have an arrangement of small gas chambers behind a glass panel, each chamber contains some amount of a Noble gas.  A grid of electronics behind the gas chambers applies voltage to different cells, which illuminates the Noble gas in that cell.  Similar to OLED, each cell is independent of the others and can be simply off when it is supposed to show black, so Plasma TVs also have very excellent black levels.  They also have very vibrant colors and wide viewing angles, and don't have any problems with motion blur like LCD-based displays might, however LCDs can generally achieve higher brightness.  Most plasma displays also have glossy panels (due to the panel construction), so this combined with the lower brightness and deep blacks make plasma TVs ideal for dark rooms.  Plasma TVs can be made fairly thin (though not quite as thin as LCD or OLED displays) but consume more power than LCD or OLED-type TVs, and the gas inside them gets hot after long usage, leading to problems with burn-in where a permanent afterimage is left behind and never fades if a static image stays on the display for a long period of time.  Manufacturers have implemented various technologies and methods of mitigating burn-in as much as possible so it is not as much of an issue as before, although the problem is not totally gone.

 

So in conclusion, basically Plasma is Plasma, OLED is OLED, CRT is CRT, and everything else is some variant of LCD.

Link to post
Share on other sites

-blah-

This guy


Main Rig: -FX8150 -32gb Kingston HyperX BLUE -120gb Kingston HyperX SSD -1TB WD Black -ASUS R9 270 DCUII OC -Corsair 300r -Full specs on Profile


Other Devices: -One Plus One 64gb Sandstone Black -Canon T5 -Moto G -Pebble Smartwatch -Nintendo 2DS -G27 Racing Wheel


#PlugYourStuff - 720penis - 1080penis - #KilledMyWife - #LinusButtPlug - #HashtagsAreALifestyle - CAR BOUGHT: 2010 Corolla

Link to post
Share on other sites

*WALL OF TEXT*

 

very nicely put together and a  good read. Thanks  ^_^


 

 

 
-------------------
|   DESKTOP    |
-------------------


Intel I7-6850K (4.4Ghz) MSI X99A Gaming Pro Carbon | Corsair Vengeance 32GB DDR4-3200mhz | x2 MSI Gaming 1080Ti  | EVGA Supernova G2 1050w 80+Gold | Samsung 950 Pro M.2 (512GB) + Samsung 850 Evo (1TB) | IN-WIN S-Frame (No. 263/500)

 
-------------------
|     SERVER     |
-------------------


X2 Intel Xeon E5-2670 (16 core 32 thread) | Intel S2600CPJ Motherboard | Samsung 128GB ECC DDDR3 1600Mhz (16 x 8GB )

LSI 9207-8I RAID Controller (IT mode) | X2 Intel 750W 80+ Platinum redundant PSU's | Lots of SSD's & HDD's!  | Intel P4000M series case.

 
------------------------
| NETWORKING LAB |
-------------------------


X2 CISCO 3845-MB ISR Routers | X3 CISCO 3560 24 port POE L3 switches | X2 CISCO 2811 ISR's | X2 CISCO 1841 ISR's 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Buy VPN

×