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JusPogi

Static feeling when touching the case

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It could be because you have a wiring fault in your AC mains. Most likely that the "neutral" and "ground" have been switched so that the case is actually connected to the neutral rather than the ground.

The neutral and ground are supposed to be at the same potential, but there can be a small difference between them.

 

Another possibility is that the "ground" wire in your AC mains is not properly physically connected to "ground" at the mains panel (fuse/breaker box)

 

Another possibility would be that the "hot" has somehow been connected to the case, in which case you are risking your life any time you touch it.

 

The best thing to do ASAP would be to get an AC voltmeter (multimeter set to AC volts) and measure the potential between your case and ground*. But, if there's a wiring fault, you may have trouble finding a reliable ground connection.

 

*ground or "earth" is a direct physical connection to the earth. One source of a "ground" if you can't rely on the electrical outlets, is the water pipes in the kitchen or bathroom.


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2 minutes ago, Quaker said:

One source of a "ground" if you can't rely on the electrical outlets, is the water pipes in the kitchen or bathroom.

Basically what you are saying is he should run a wire throughout his house to such a pipe. seems funny, but you are right :)

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Describe what you are feeling - it is a single zap/arc, or does it last for the entire duration you are in contact with the chassis?

 

If the former then that is just static discharge (the chassis is a good ground source.)  No worries.

 

If it is the latter then you have more serious problems - First, there is voltage on the chassis sufficient for you to feel it through your skin (most likely wall current.) and Second, that chassis is supposed to be in electrical contact with ground (so whatever voltage is present should want to flow to ground - path of least resistance - rather than flowing through you.

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23 hours ago, Erest said:

Basically what you are saying is he should run a wire throughout his house to such a pipe. seems funny, but you are right :)

Well, no, a better idea would be to check the resistance (or voltage) between the water pipes and the "ground" terminal on a nearby outlet, rather than running a long wire. :)

That would determine if the outlet's ground is connected properly.

Then he'd have to determine if the outlet the computer is plugged into is also connected properly.

Of course, this all a job for someone who knows about house wiring - an electrician, etc.

 


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Posted · Original PosterOP
On 8/30/2016 at 8:17 AM, ThomasD said:

Describe what you are feeling - it is a single zap/arc, or does it last for the entire duration you are in contact with the chassis?

 

If the former then that is just static discharge (the chassis is a good ground source.)  No worries.

 

If it is the latter then you have more serious problems - First, there is voltage on the chassis sufficient for you to feel it through your skin (most likely wall current.) and Second, that chassis is supposed to be in electrical contact with ground (so whatever voltage is present should want to flow to ground - path of least resistance - rather than flowing through you.

It lasts for the entire duration when im touching the chassis and also the usb ports

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3 hours ago, JusPogi said:

It lasts for the entire duration when im touching the chassis and also the usb ports

You have a short somewhere in your system.  Is your computer a factory build or something you put together yourself?  And where are you located (electric standards vary by country/region)?

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Posted · Original PosterOP
On 8/31/2016 at 8:48 PM, ThomasD said:

You have a short somewhere in your system.  Is your computer a factory build or something you put together yourself?  And where are you located (electric standards vary by country/region)?

Built by technicians at the store i bought the rig. Philippines. 

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15 minutes ago, JusPogi said:

Built by technicians at the store i bought the rig. Philippines. 

have you tried contacting them about the issue?


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3 hours ago, JusPogi said:

Built by technicians at the store i bought the rig. Philippines. 

According to what I can find on the internet your wall outlets are all two prong (no third grounding prong)  and either blade type or rounded pin type. 

 

http://treehouse.ofb.net/go/en/voltage/Philippines

 

Is this correct?  If so then you may have a polarity issue. 

 

Can you try unplugging the power cord and then plugging it in with the prongs flipped (ie. whatever prong is currently in the left receptacle, turn it so that prong is in the right.)  Then check to see if the problem has gone away.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
14 hours ago, 0ld_Chicken said:

have you tried contacting them about the issue?

Yes they said it is normal, but i think it isn't normal because i read somewhere online that it can affect my motherboard

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1 hour ago, JusPogi said:

Yes they said it is normal, but i think it isn't normal because i read somewhere online that it can affect my motherboard

I'm going to tell you that you're not supposed to feel that when touching your chassis. The chassis is supposed to be a safe thing to touch, including not feeling any sort of electricity flowing through your body(static electricity is another issue, but that's not a safety issue usually).


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Is your wall outlet two prong?

 

If so, did you try reversing the electrical connection like I suggested?

 

“Electrical power flows in the form of current, which must pass through the equipment and then return to the power source. Therefore, it is convenient to think of one wire to the load being the “source” wire and one being the “return” wire. This simple model is appropriate for DC systems but does not work for an AC system because the flow of the power is continually reversing direction with a frequency of 50 or 60 times per second. From the point of view of the equipment or the power source, the source and return wires are constantly being interchanged. In fact, no equipment can tell which wire is which! It is easily demonstrated that the two power wires to any piece of AC equipment can be interchanged without any effect on function. In fact, in Europe [and the Philippines], the plug on a piece of equipment can be plugged in either way! This fact of symmetry seems to be at odds with the distinct labeling of the AC power wires as “hot” and “neutral”. The reason that one of the power wires is named “neutral” is because it is connected directly to the building ground connection at the circuit breaker panel. Therefore it is connected directly to the grounding (third) wire. In essence, then, two of the three wires at the wall receptacle are actually grounded wires, one being used for power flow, and the other connected only to exposed metal parts on the equipment. The power wire that is grounded is called the “neutral” wire because it is not dangerous with respect to exposed metal parts or plumbing. The “hot” wire gets its name because it is dangerous. The grounding of the neutral wire is not related to the operation of electrical equipment but is required for reasons of safety.”

 

http://myphilippinelife.com/philippine-electrical-wiring/

 

Many computer PSUs share a common ground with the chassis.  If your two prong plug is connected so that what should be "neutral" is instead "hot" that will put wall voltage on the chassis.  This was a common situation here in the US back before we started using three prong outlets (hot, neutral, and ground) and devices that had a metal chassis (like amplifiers) included a polarity switch.   With most other modern consumer devices this is not even an issue because the metal chassis (if any) is completely covered with plastic or other non-conductive material.

 

The primary danger is not to your motherboard.  The danger is to you or anyone else who touches the chassis.  If they also happen to be in contact with a better ground source than the floor they could end up with full wall voltage running through their body.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 hour ago, ThomasD said:

Is your wall outlet two prong?

 

If so, did you try reversing the electrical connection like I suggested?

 

“Electrical power flows in the form of current, which must pass through the equipment and then return to the power source. Therefore, it is convenient to think of one wire to the load being the “source” wire and one being the “return” wire. This simple model is appropriate for DC systems but does not work for an AC system because the flow of the power is continually reversing direction with a frequency of 50 or 60 times per second. From the point of view of the equipment or the power source, the source and return wires are constantly being interchanged. In fact, no equipment can tell which wire is which! It is easily demonstrated that the two power wires to any piece of AC equipment can be interchanged without any effect on function. In fact, in Europe [and the Philippines], the plug on a piece of equipment can be plugged in either way! This fact of symmetry seems to be at odds with the distinct labeling of the AC power wires as “hot” and “neutral”. The reason that one of the power wires is named “neutral” is because it is connected directly to the building ground connection at the circuit breaker panel. Therefore it is connected directly to the grounding (third) wire. In essence, then, two of the three wires at the wall receptacle are actually grounded wires, one being used for power flow, and the other connected only to exposed metal parts on the equipment. The power wire that is grounded is called the “neutral” wire because it is not dangerous with respect to exposed metal parts or plumbing. The “hot” wire gets its name because it is dangerous. The grounding of the neutral wire is not related to the operation of electrical equipment but is required for reasons of safety.”

 

http://myphilippinelife.com/philippine-electrical-wiring/

 

Many computer PSUs share a common ground with the chassis.  If your two prong plug is connected so that what should be "neutral" is instead "hot" that will put wall voltage on the chassis.  This was a common situation here in the US back before we started using three prong outlets (hot, neutral, and ground) and devices that had a metal chassis (like amplifiers) included a polarity switch.   With most other modern consumer devices this is not even an issue because the metal chassis (if any) is completely covered with plastic or other non-conductive material.

 

The primary danger is not to your motherboard.  The danger is to you or anyone else who touches the chassis.  If they also happen to be in contact with a better ground source than the floor they could end up with full wall voltage running through their body.

I've opened the outlet which i was using and surprised that there is no grounding cord on the outlet. is there any way i can put a ground on the outlet? 

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@JusPogi if you have other people touch it i the same conditions do they feel it too?


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Just now, JusPogi said:

Yes all of us feels it. 

Yeah then theres probably a electrical fault somewhere. Weird


My PC: 

CPU: Intel i5-6600K @ 4.7Ghz Motherboard: EVGA Z170 FTW RAM: 2x8GB Corsair LPX GPU 1: EVGA GTX 1060 FTW GPU 2: MSI R9 270X HAWK Case: NZXT H440 Blue Storage: 120GB PNY, 1TB Hitachi Monitor: Asus VC279 Keyboard: Corsair K95 RGB (MX Brown) Mouse: Logitech G602

Guest PC: 

Spoiler

CPU: AMD FX-8320 Motherboard: Some shit Gigabyte board RAM: 2x4GB G.Skill Ares 2133Mhz GPU: EVGA GTX 570 DoubleShot Case: Idk. Some cheap case Storage: 250GB HDD Monitor: Some NEC thing Keyboard: Logitech G105 Mouse: Some Microsoft mouse

 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 minute ago, TubsAlwaysWins said:

Yeah then theres probably a electrical fault somewhere. Weird

Yes and i don't know how to fix it. 

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Just now, JusPogi said:

Yes and i don't know how to fix it. 

I would contact the system builders about it. (If I read correctly you said someone else built it).

I would also try plugging in a different computer into the same outlet but im not sure if that would accomplish anything. (Maybe tell you if its the computer or the outlet???)


My PC: 

CPU: Intel i5-6600K @ 4.7Ghz Motherboard: EVGA Z170 FTW RAM: 2x8GB Corsair LPX GPU 1: EVGA GTX 1060 FTW GPU 2: MSI R9 270X HAWK Case: NZXT H440 Blue Storage: 120GB PNY, 1TB Hitachi Monitor: Asus VC279 Keyboard: Corsair K95 RGB (MX Brown) Mouse: Logitech G602

Guest PC: 

Spoiler

CPU: AMD FX-8320 Motherboard: Some shit Gigabyte board RAM: 2x4GB G.Skill Ares 2133Mhz GPU: EVGA GTX 570 DoubleShot Case: Idk. Some cheap case Storage: 250GB HDD Monitor: Some NEC thing Keyboard: Logitech G105 Mouse: Some Microsoft mouse

 

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7 hours ago, JusPogi said:

I've opened the outlet which i was using and surprised that there is no grounding cord on the outlet. is there any way i can put a ground on the outlet? 

Yes, an electrician could install a ground, but depending on the situation it could be rather expensive.

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Lemme interject some advice on this as I work in the industry.

 

Yes, if you have the option to add a grounding plug into house, you could do it. However, with that said, if you are doing the work yourself, you need to be EXTREMELY careful with what you are doing, and should research the job at hand in great detail as this could cause serious damage, injury and/or death.

 

Over here in the states we use whats called Romex wire, Most common is 12-2 (12 guage, 2 wire with a "third" bare copper for ground) that will handle 110V at around 20A. Black is your Hot wire (DO NOT TOUCH WHEN ENERGIZED), white is your Neutral (ALSO DO NOT TOUCH, You can be electrocuted even though its supposed to be safe) Green or bare is your ground wire.

 

If your house doesn't have any grounds (some here in the states still dont), you can typically add a ground bus bar to your panel (with the main breaker OFF) and then run a thick enough stranded copper wire to a metal stake in the ground. Any circuit grounds can then be made up to that bar.

 

However, I must stress this, as I've done it on the job. Be EXTREMELY careful working in a panel box, ESPECIALLY if its energized, Exposed hot buses and bare copper DO NOT mix and could potentially short, causing an arc flash. If that copper should go phase to phase, it can potentially kill you.

 

If you don't feel comfortable doing this yourself, Hire a qualified electrician.

 

Also, whatever you do, STOP TOUCHING THE CASE. Better yet, unplug it until you can fix the problem.

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I personally have had it happen on all my computers, whenever Im barefoot and I touch the case, the earphones or my blue snowball I get a shock


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Posted · Original PosterOP
On 9/5/2016 at 3:42 AM, Julian5 said:

I personally have had it happen on all my computers, whenever Im barefoot and I touch the case, the earphones or my blue snowball I get a shock

Same problem as mine. how did you fix it?

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5 hours ago, JusPogi said:

Same problem as mine. how did you fix it?

I have not fixed it, I think my electrical system / splitter is not grounded and thats why everything I touch in my room gives me a shock lol


Elemental 

Spoiler

Intel i5 6500 @3.8ghz - 8GB HyperX - 600w Apex PSU - GTX 1060 G1 GIGABYTE 6GB - s340 Black - 240gb Toshiba Q300 - Cooler master TX3i - MSI z170-A PRO.

Old Build (sold for 290€)

Spoiler

Intel i3 540 @ 3.9ghz (On stock cooler, Hits 80c max) - 8gb ram - 500w power supply - P7H55-M LE  120gb SSD - Talius Drakko case

Project Frug 50$ Water loop

 

Laptops

Spoiler

13" Macbook Air - Alienware m14x r2 -  2009 15" Macbook Pro (I was give all of these and would never buy them myself)

 

 

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