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M4SH1R0

Can I put a higher MHz RAM?

15 minutes ago, M4SH1R0 said:

Just updated the post, please take a look. Thank you very much.

Notice the (O.C.) besides RAM speeds in the motherboard support page. O.C.=overclocked, meaning you have to enter the BIOS and set the speeds there (usually enbaling the XMP profile), otherwise everything reverts to the JEDEC standard for DDR4 (2133MHz.)

 

For comparison, all core i DDR3 CPUs were rated for 1600MHz RAM, al AMD FX and APUS for 1866, and some of the latest APUS for 2133. But DDR3 at higher than 1600/1866 speeds was always there and working, in most cases you just needed to set the right speed in BIOS.

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Can I put a higher MHz than the ones that are supported by the CPU? What "side effects" does it bring? And how to fix if the computer shows the MHz lower than it should be? But it is supported by the motherboard, idk...

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1: you should be able to use faster ram but it will lower to the highest supported speed

2: cant see your pictures

3: ddr = double data rate so if your using say 1600mhz ddr it will report its true speed of 800mhz and so on

4: if 3 isn't the reason go into your bios and make sure its set up right with xmp etc

5: I'm outa answers now ;)

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Posted · Original PosterOP
Just now, kalious78 said:

1: you should be able to use faster ram but it will lower to the highest supported speed

2: cant see your pictures

3: ddr = double data rate so if your using say 1600mhz ddr it will report its true speed of 800mhz and so on

4: if 3 isn't the reason go into your bios and make sure its set up right with xmp etc

5: I'm outa answers now ;)

Just updated the post, please take a look. Thank you very much.

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Yep, 2133MHz is the JEDEC standard for DDR4. Since that motherboard supports 3000MHz RAM, you should be fine.

 

As for benefits, whenever there's a CPU-intensive situation, you'll see a small boost in your minimum and perhaps average framerates, reducing stuttering.


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Posted · Best Answer
15 minutes ago, M4SH1R0 said:

Just updated the post, please take a look. Thank you very much.

Notice the (O.C.) besides RAM speeds in the motherboard support page. O.C.=overclocked, meaning you have to enter the BIOS and set the speeds there (usually enbaling the XMP profile), otherwise everything reverts to the JEDEC standard for DDR4 (2133MHz.)

 

For comparison, all core i DDR3 CPUs were rated for 1600MHz RAM, al AMD FX and APUS for 1866, and some of the latest APUS for 2133. But DDR3 at higher than 1600/1866 speeds was always there and working, in most cases you just needed to set the right speed in BIOS.

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