Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Jerahmy

Good place/website to learn Python

Recommended Posts

Posted · Original PosterOP

Hello!

 

I have been "learning" Python using Codeacademy, but I feel like they aren't teaching me what I should know. The further I get into the more it seems like they didn't teach me previous lessons too well. They are having me do exercises that they briefly touch upon. Also I feel like they are not making me learn good habits. When i'm done with an exercise it looks like a complete and utter disorganized disaster. So, I was wondering what new/intermediate/pro programmers would recommend for people to use to learn a programming language.

**EDIT** I am looking for free websites/sources.

 

Thanks,

Jerahmy  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I would say Lynda.com because I am learning HTML and CSS with them right now and love the instructors.


Currently have a Zotac Amp 1080 TI with a Ryzen 5 3600.

Nothing fancy but it does well for 4k gaming.

Link to post
Share on other sites

GrokLearning.com is a good place to start - costs a bit of money, however.

A free alternative is Codecademy - but the last I checked the newest version they teach is 2.7 - different syntax to the more modern (and easier) Python 3.x

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted · Original PosterOP
2 minutes ago, Orangeator said:

Well, I would say Lynda.com because I am learning HTML and CSS with them right now and love the instructors.

I should have stated, and will make an edit. I am looking for free website/sources to learn.

 

Thanks for the reply!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted · Original PosterOP
2 minutes ago, ShaolinBear said:

GrokLearning.com is a good place to start - costs a bit of money, however.

A free alternative is Codecademy - but the last I checked the newest version they teach is 2.7 - different syntax to the more modern (and easier) Python 3.x

I should have stated, and will make an edit. I am looking for free website/sources to learn.

 

Also, I already said I have been using Codeacademy and am not too pleased on how they are teaching it.

 

Thanks for the reply!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Jerahmy said:

I should have stated, and will make an edit. I am looking for free website/sources to learn.

 

Thanks for the reply!

codeacademy provides some basic python i believe. But honestly the amount of value you can get with lynda is incredible. If you want to really understand python well it's definitely worth it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Jerahmy said:

I should have stated, and will make an edit. I am looking for free website/sources to learn.

 

Thanks for the reply!

https://www.reddit.com/r/learnpython

 

I believe they would be able to help quite well. Also I will be sending you a PM regarding this topic.


Currently have a Zotac Amp 1080 TI with a Ryzen 5 3600.

Nothing fancy but it does well for 4k gaming.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted · Original PosterOP
Just now, mcfly said:

codeacademy provides some basic python i believe. But honestly the amount of value you can get with lynda is incredible. If you want to really understand python well it's definitely worth it.

I wouldn't mind paying for a source (I.E. Lynda.com), but I am 15 and in highschool. I also don't have a job so there is no income for me to spend on the subscriptions. THat is why I am looking for a free source/website.

 

Thanks for the reply!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted · Original PosterOP
Just now, Orangeator said:

https://www.reddit.com/r/learnpython

 

I believe they would be able to help quite well. Also I will be sending you a PM regarding this topic.

I will check out said link. I will also be looking forward to a PM.

 

Thanks for the reply!

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are willing to spend money I'd say UDEMY.com, freebies I couldn't say for sure. There's a lot of variability in quality and content among all of them

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted · Original PosterOP
Just now, HalGameGuru said:

If you are willing to spend money I'd say UDEMY.com, freebies I couldn't say for sure. There's a lot of variability in quality and content among all of them

I will keep this in mind if/when I am able to financially support myself. 

 

Thanks for the reply!

Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Gachr said:

Official docs: https://docs.python.org/3/

I don't know why people overcomplicate things with a crapton of bad websites, just go to the official docs.

Another good website: http://www.tutorialspoint.com/python3/index.htm

Also, what are you learning Python for?

Learning from a structured course isn't always a bad thing, can be good for getting the basics without getting a bunch of gaps in your knowledge. The docs only really help once you have a basic understanding of the language, or know a few others beforehand

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, MSVSora said:

Learning from a structured course isn't always a bad thing, can be good for getting the basics without getting a bunch of gaps in your knowledge. The docs only really help once you have a basic understanding of the language, or know a few others beforehand

I agree, however those basics are pretty easy to grasp and OP should already have the knowledge to use the docs freely.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't personally vouch for it, but Learn Python the Hard Way has a good reputation.  (I've used Learn C The Hard Way, by the same guy, designed the same general way, and very much liked it, so I assume that the much more complete Python version is also pretty good).  If you're willing to spend some money on a book, O'Reilly has some generally very good ones for Python and other languages; I have Natural Language Processing with Python and it's quite well-written.  That particular one is also available online for free, so check if any of their other Python ones are.  They'd be a pretty thorough and good source.

 

The official documentation is also a surprisingly good place to start.  There's a page for newcomers to Python, with links to a good number of resources (follow the links under "Learning Python" and there are a lot).  There's also The Python Tutorial on the Python.org site, which is a pretty good introduction to the language.

 

I also have gotten in the habit of pointing people towards Project Euler, which has a very large set of mathematics-oriented problems for you to solve, and can be a great way to get some more practical experience with really any language.  This might not be the best resource, though, if you're not interested in a more numerical computation approach to learning, but give it a look and give a problem or two a try before writing it off.  (Be warned, some of the later problems can be very tricky, especially for someone still in high school who maybe hasn't been exposed to some of the math in the later problems).

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/4/2016 at 8:10 PM, Jerahmy said:

I will keep this in mind if/when I am able to financially support myself. 

 

Thanks for the reply!

For learning python I would suggest Learn Python the Hard Way or Think Python. I've tried learn C the hard way, and it is very well done. It truly teaches you how to program, not just syntax (which is really what Codecademy does). I've also read a significant amount of Think Python and it is an excellent book as well.


CPU: AMD FX-6300 4GHz @ 1.3 volts | CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO | RAM: 8GB DDR3

Motherboard: Gigabyte 970A-DS3P | GPU: EVGA GTX 960 SSC | SSD: 250GB Samsung 850 EVO

HDD: 1TB WD Caviar Green | Case: Fractal Design Core 2500 | OS: Windows 10 Home

Link to post
Share on other sites

or if you wanna watch videos on python and many other different languages lookup thenewboston on youtube not my channel but its very good and also even the official docs on python.org are ok even if some things on there are pretty rough around the edges I'm currently in my first python class for my cs degree and by far the best thing to help you once you get the basics is from python.org good luck!

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/3/2016 at 7:04 PM, Jerahmy said:

I wouldn't mind paying for a source (I.E. Lynda.com), but I am 15 and in highschool. I also don't have a job so there is no income for me to spend on the subscriptions. THat is why I am looking for a free source/website.

 

Thanks for the reply!

Most public libraries in the USA will have an organization partnership with Lynda.  So if you have a library card you can go to your library website and search for their Lynda portal.  From there you can create a new Lynda profile/account, enter in your library card # and submit a new password.  Then you get unlimited access to Lynda including downloads.  It requires accessing Lynda via the library portal login, but it is otherwise seamless and as if you paid for the $300+ full year membership.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×