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LinusTech

pfSense DIY Router Build Log pt 1

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Idk about you guys , but that backplate is touching those solder points ... 

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@LinusTech I agree with the others saying it is the backplate, only thing it could be. Maybe 3d print one or put tape on the metal one to keep from shorting?

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I'm not saying that its the backplate, but its the backplate. Its probably coated with something non conductive but since you've cut it and exposed bare metal which was pretty close to exposed solder points, that might have caused a spark to jump onto the bracket shorting out the motherboard.

He could probably sand down or snip the metal standing out of the solder points. Putting a coating of a restistive material on the plate might help too.

 

Love the idea, but man I hated this video. I was so excited when I heard you were doing this video. You should have done much more research into the parts. As entertaining as it is sometimes, it would be nice to look up to you and your projects. I think people should look at your projects and say "Wow that is cool. I want to do something cool that works." I don't think people like thinking "Wow, Linus keeps failing/doing a terrible job at these projects." Not that you have been failing a bunch, but failure of projects/the number of technical difficulties are increasing and it's just getting more frustrating to watch. This Part 1 should not have been posted. Should have scrapped it all and started over once you had an actual idea about what you were doing and possibly changed the parts so they actually work and aren't freaking hot glued, ground down, and ripped apart! Some people would like to do the projects you are doing but don't want to take these big risks like majorly modding/hacking their materials. Some people just want something that they can put together without a workshop and possibly ruining their hardware. I love the creativity but want something that we can possibly do as well without a team and a bunch of extra hardware.

With that being said, I do really appreciate your videos (almost every time) and please ignore the haters and just be your self; but be a little professional please.

*end rant

If he made a video where all he did was succeed we might as well watch someone else's video, and we would learn nothing about what could go wrong in a real scenario.

 

Everything you do in this video makes me question your credibility.

 

You put a $370 server chip in a router ..... WTF WHY?

You did not check for compatiblity of parts.

 

Here is what you should have done...... use a 2U/4U rackmount chassis since you want to rack mount it. (I would have just used a Mini-ITX case and called it a day)

A 2U/4U chassis supports a standard ATX PSU, a Standard IO shield, proper airflow, any motherboard you wish to use. Costs roughly the same as the 1U chassis you got.  And can still be rackmounted.

 

Example: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BQY36DC?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=ox_sc_act_title_2&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

Example: http://www.amazon.com/iStarUSA-Server-Chassis-Cases-D-214-MATX/dp/B00A7NBO6E/ref=sr_1_21?ie=UTF8&qid=1442138029&sr=8-21&keywords=2u+rackmount+chassis

Example: http://www.amazon.com/Rosewill-Thickness-Rackmount-Chassis-RSV-L4412/dp/B00N9CXGSO/ref=sr_1_17?ie=UTF8&qid=1442137996&sr=8-17-spons&keywords=2u+rackmount+chassis

 

You could have made it an interesting build if you built the router in something like the Coolermaster Elite 110 and then decided to DIY rackmount that case.

 

You could have easily made do with a dual core Atom chip or one of the Quad/Octo core integrated chips.

Because he owns a 370 USD server CPU. And a 2/4U doesn't fit in 1U of space. And if all he did was buy something with plenty of space, this would be nothing more than every other "Put a PC in an ATX case" video that there are millions on the internet.

 

PS: Don't ever mention the Atom ever again unless the device is going to be running on battery for more than 75% of it's running time.

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Everything you do in this video makes me question your credibility.

 

You put a $370 server chip in a router ..... WTF WHY?

You did not check for compatiblity of parts.

 

Here is what you should have done...... use a 2U/4U rackmount chassis since you want to rack mount it. (I would have just used a Mini-ITX case and called it a day)

A 2U/4U chassis supports a standard ATX PSU, a Standard IO shield, proper airflow, any motherboard you wish to use. Costs roughly the same as the 1U chassis you got.  And can still be rackmounted.

 

Example: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BQY36DC?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=ox_sc_act_title_2&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

Example: http://www.amazon.com/iStarUSA-Server-Chassis-Cases-D-214-MATX/dp/B00A7NBO6E/ref=sr_1_21?ie=UTF8&qid=1442138029&sr=8-21&keywords=2u+rackmount+chassis

Example: http://www.amazon.com/Rosewill-Thickness-Rackmount-Chassis-RSV-L4412/dp/B00N9CXGSO/ref=sr_1_17?ie=UTF8&qid=1442137996&sr=8-17-spons&keywords=2u+rackmount+chassis

 

You could have made it an interesting build if you built the router in something like the Coolermaster Elite 110 and then decided to DIY rackmount that case.

 

You could have easily made do with a dual core Atom chip or one of the Quad/Octo core integrated chips.

 

Even with a 2U case I think Linus would have to have had to take out the dremel, but definitely less than with the 1U..  Like PSU compatibility etc.

 

I would recommend something like this, what my old job did was purchase these from NCIX:

http://www.ncix.com/detail/supermicro-5018a-tn4-1u-atom-c2750-03-95608.htm

 

Then you purchase the ECC unbuffered RAM, Intel 32GB SSD or something like that (doesn't need to be big), image pfSense via TFTP (recommend fog) and you're done!  The board even comes with quad 1Gbps.  This is really a pretty good and easy solution.

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*Looks at thumbnail* No, @LinusTech makes it seem really really hard.


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Please make the intro slogan for part 2 "If it aint broke, fix it 'till it is"

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Posted · Original PosterOP

I do appreciate people's input but it's not the backplate. I've probably installed 100+ backplates in my time. I'm not exactly new to it.

And yes of course I know I could just eBay an old rackmount server. I can afford to do that no problem.

How many of you will watch that video of me shopping on eBay then waiting for it to arrive and sliding it into a rack?

Remember, my business is making videos, not building routers - i cannot emphasize this enough.

Anyway, stay tuned for part 2. I've got another board inbound :D

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Remember, my business is making videos, not building routers - i cannot emphasize this enough.

And it is entertainment as well. If the videos were always perfect, I'm not sure how many views you would actually get.


"It pays to keep an open mind, but not so open your brains fall out." - Carl Sagan.

"If you place a piece of bread somewhere on Earth, and another one on that point's antipodes, well you made yourself an Earth-sandwich." - Michael from Vsauce.

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He could probably sand down or snip the metal standing out of the solder points. Putting a coating of a restistive material on the plate might help too.

 

If he made a video where all he did was succeed we might as well watch someone else's video, and we would learn nothing about what could go wrong in a real scenario.

 

Because he owns a 370 USD server CPU. And a 2/4U doesn't fit in 1U of space. And if all he did was buy something with plenty of space, this would be nothing more than every other "Put a PC in an ATX case" video that there are millions on the internet.

 

PS: Don't ever mention the Atom ever again unless the device is going to be running on battery for more than 75% of it's running time.

It is a freaking ROUTER! not a SERVER. a ROUTER has no NEED for a XEON SERVER processor. Or have you never built a ROUTER before? I guarentee you that if a ROUTER required a XEON SERVER processor, CISCO would have all their routers using XEON processors. But they dont do they? Hak5 and Teksyndicate both made router videos. Both did the research. Both got it right.

 

Plus, Linus never specified how much space he had in the rack. He just said he picked up a 1U rackmount chassis. Most likely for the small size which for a router would logically make sense since most CISCO routers are only 1U. But, CISCO has their router science down pat. They don't use SERVER processors in their routers. When I refer to CISCO I am not referrring to their Linksys line of routers. I am referring to the Enterprise grade routers.

 

General idea of a router build:

 

intel Atom or AMD E-series chip integrated onboard. dual gigabit NICs. Addon expansion card for additional ports if needed. such as 10GbE ports for additional connections to other routers on a network. At most 4GB of RAM. ECC is not necessary. if this was a NAS or File Server then ECC would make sense.

if you can get a VIA board do it. If you can get an ARM board do it.

 

if you use an Atom Dual core or AMD dual core integrated chip with passive cooling, you should have no problem fitting such a board in a 2U chassis. a 2U chassis supports a standard ATX PSU. As you would see if you followed the 3 links I provided.

 

Hak5 does it right. they used an Atom CPU so get off your high horse.

 

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And it is entertainment as well. If the videos were always perfect, I'm not sure how many views you would actually get.

Indeed. If Linus never made any mistakes in these kinds of videos, I doubt he'd be where he is today.


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Indeed. If Linus never made any mistakes in these kinds of videos, I doubt he'd be where he is today.

painting a motherboard...
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I do appreciate people's input but it's not the backplate. I've probably installed 100+ backplates in my time. I'm not exactly new to it.

And yes of course I know I could just eBay an old rackmount server. I can afford to do that no problem.

How many of you will watch that video of me shopping on eBay then waiting for it to arrive and sliding it into a rack?

Remember, my business is making videos, not building routers - i cannot emphasize this enough.

Anyway, stay tuned for part 2. I've got another board inbound :D

Even though the channel is hardware based, I have enjoyed the few software focused videos over the years more so I would be interested if the video was on software configuration instead of hardware.

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When Linus wears earbuds that aren't plugged into anything...


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It is a freaking ROUTER! not a SERVER. a ROUTER has no NEED for a XEON SERVER processor. Or have you never built a ROUTER before? I guarentee you that if a ROUTER required a XEON SERVER processor, CISCO would have all their routers using XEON processors. But they dont do they? Hak5 and Teksyndicate both made router videos. Both did the research. Both got it right.

 

Plus, Linus never specified how much space he had in the rack. He just said he picked up a 1U rackmount chassis. Most likely for the small size which for a router would logically make sense since most CISCO routers are only 1U. But, CISCO has their router science down pat. They don't use SERVER processors in their routers. When I refer to CISCO I am not referrring to their Linksys line of routers. I am referring to the Enterprise grade routers.

 

General idea of a router build:

 

intel Atom or AMD E-series chip integrated onboard. dual gigabit NICs. Addon expansion card for additional ports if needed. such as 10GbE ports for additional connections to other routers on a network. At most 4GB of RAM. ECC is not necessary. if this was a NAS or File Server then ECC would make sense.

if you can get a VIA board do it. If you can get an ARM board do it.

 

if you use an Atom Dual core or AMD dual core integrated chip with passive cooling, you should have no problem fitting such a board in a 2U chassis. a 2U chassis supports a standard ATX PSU. As you would see if you followed the 3 links I provided.

 

Hak5 does it right. they used an Atom CPU so get off your high horse.

 

you've never worked with a router that doesn't have enough RAM or CPU... trying to get multiarea OSPF working on a crappy router is painful, you get more than 10-15 entries in the routing table and you get 100% util. and the latency goes through the roof. you need decent specs to keep traffic going at a decent speed 


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It is a freaking ROUTER! not a SERVER. a ROUTER has no NEED for a XEON SERVER processor. Or have you never built a ROUTER before? I guarentee you that if a ROUTER required a XEON SERVER processor, CISCO would have all their routers using XEON processors. But they dont do they? Hak5 and Teksyndicate both made router videos. Both did the research. Both got it right.

 

Plus, Linus never specified how much space he had in the rack. He just said he picked up a 1U rackmount chassis. Most likely for the small size which for a router would logically make sense since most CISCO routers are only 1U. But, CISCO has their router science down pat. They don't use SERVER processors in their routers. When I refer to CISCO I am not referrring to their Linksys line of routers. I am referring to the Enterprise grade routers.

 

General idea of a router build:

 

intel Atom or AMD E-series chip integrated onboard. dual gigabit NICs. Addon expansion card for additional ports if needed. such as 10GbE ports for additional connections to other routers on a network. At most 4GB of RAM. ECC is not necessary. if this was a NAS or File Server then ECC would make sense.

if you can get a VIA board do it. If you can get an ARM board do it.

 

if you use an Atom Dual core or AMD dual core integrated chip with passive cooling, you should have no problem fitting such a board in a 2U chassis. a 2U chassis supports a standard ATX PSU. As you would see if you followed the 3 links I provided.

 

Hak5 does it right. they used an Atom CPU so get off your high horse.

 

Is a Xeon a worse processor for a router? He has it, it's free to use. Unless it's a detriment, there is no reason not to use it.

 

Regardless of how much space he has, if his project is to use 1U, that's what his goal will be.

 

Yes, using a 2U would be easier, but that isn't the goal. It'd be like watching a portable LAN build and stating that everything would fit easier if he used a Full Tower.

 

 

When Linus wears earbuds that aren't plugged into anything...

He's deaf, but it's the easiest way to let people know he can't hear them.

 

 

I do appreciate people's input but it's not the backplate. I've probably installed 100+ backplates in my time. I'm not exactly new to it.

And yes of course I know I could just eBay an old rackmount server. I can afford to do that no problem.

How many of you will watch that video of me shopping on eBay then waiting for it to arrive and sliding it into a rack?

Remember, my business is making videos, not building routers - i cannot emphasize this enough.

Anyway, stay tuned for part 2. I've got another board inbound  :D

 

You should have a section where you break out a router to trim metal off the case.

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you've never worked with a router that doesn't have enough RAM or CPU... trying to get multiarea OSPF working on a crappy router is painful, you get more than 10-15 entries in the routing table and you get 100% util. and the latency goes through the roof. you need decent specs to keep traffic going at a decent speed 

 

I don't mean to start a flame war, but how exactly is multiarea OSPF relevant?  ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°).  Linus probably won't even be running Snort.  I mean if he were to be using it as a host machine to run pfSense + other machines, sure, but that doesn't seem to be the case.

 

 

 

Is a Xeon a worse processor for a router? He has it, it's free to use. Unless it's a detriment, there is no reason not to use it.

 

Regardless of how much space he has, if his project is to use 1U, that's what his goal will be.

 

Yes, using a 2U would be easier, but that isn't the goal. It'd be like watching a portable LAN build and stating that everything would fit easier if he used a Full Tower.

 

 

He's deaf, but it's the easiest way to let people know he can't hear them.

 

 

If/when it overheats, one could argue!

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I don't mean to start a flame war, but how exactly is multiarea OSPF relevant?  ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°).  Linus probably won't even be running Snort.  I mean if he were to be using it as a host machine to run pfSense + other machines, sure, but that doesn't seem to be the case.

just an example, routers can use the extra resources to speed up transactions, you can run a router on 512MB of ram and a bunch of ASIC chips

 

*even 512MB is a bit much for simple stuff


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I do appreciate people's input but it's not the backplate. I've probably installed 100+ backplates in my time. I'm not exactly new to it.

And yes of course I know I could just eBay an old rackmount server. I can afford to do that no problem.

How many of you will watch that video of me shopping on eBay then waiting for it to arrive and sliding it into a rack?

Remember, my business is making videos, not building routers - i cannot emphasize this enough.

Anyway, stay tuned for part 2. I've got another board inbound :D

I8qq6TM.jpg

I agree, one of these would make for a boring video


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Love these types of videos, sadly I will be away for 3 months with no access to any electricity so part 2 (and other videos) will have to wait :'(

 

Since the backplate can be ruled out, I'd say it's a CPU error.


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you've never worked with a router that doesn't have enough RAM or CPU... trying to get multiarea OSPF working on a crappy router is painful, you get more than 10-15 entries in the routing table and you get 100% util. and the latency goes through the roof. you need decent specs to keep traffic going at a decent speed 

 

Actually, i have. I am a network technician and work with Cisco routers and switches every day. Multiarea OSPF wont require a xeon processor or more than 4gb of RAM. Otherwise Cisco would put a xeon processor in the 3000 series enterprise backbone routers. Most high end Cisco routers are stacked routers. Some places even bypass a traditional router and instead use a Layer 3 Switch. I always advise against relying on a L3 switch instead of a router.  i still stand by an intel Atom, AMD zecate, or VIA chip setup with up to 4GB of RAM. 8GB at the maximum for Overkill purposes.

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Love these types of videos, sadly I will be away for 3 months with no access to any electricity so part 2 (and other videos) will have to wait :'(

 

Since the backplate can be ruled out, I'd say it's a CPU error.

Bring a rechargeable battery pack and an Android phone and save it for when it gets released, then get to a Wifi hotspot or use cellular data.

 

 

Actually, i have. I am a network technician and work with Cisco routers and switches every day. Multiarea OSPF wont require a xeon processor or more than 4gb of RAM. Otherwise Cisco would put a xeon processor in the 3000 series enterprise backbone routers. Most high end Cisco routers are stacked routers. Some places even bypass a traditional router and instead use a Layer 3 Switch. I always advise against relying on a L3 switch instead of a router.  i still stand by an intel Atom, AMD zecate, or VIA chip setup with up to 4GB of RAM. 8GB at the maximum for Overkill purposes.

Cisco doesn't put Xeons in their equipment because that would cause the profit margin to crumble. I have yet to hear a reason why not to use a Xeon if it's free to use.

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