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Linux or Windows for coding?

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Posted · Original PosterOP

I am thinking about learning some computer programming on the side. I just built a new PC and I plan on converting my old one into a dedicated work station. Mainly for school work (I'm not accounting major so it'll be mostly word docs and online work sheets) and so I don't have games on it to distract me while working. Might throw two WD greens in raid 1. ANYWAYS! Would you suggest linux or windows for programming? I was reading Macs Unix based OS is good because it is a lot like linux. I haven't used a mac before just going off what I read.


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I am thinking about learning some computer programming on the side. I just built a new PC and I plan on converting my old one into a dedicated work station. Mainly for school work (I'm not accounting major so it'll be mostly word docs and online work sheets) and so I don't have games on it to distract me while working. Might throw two WD greens in raid 1. ANYWAYS! Would you suggest linux or windows for programming? I was reading Macs Unix based OS is good because it is a lot like linux. I haven't used a mac before just going off what I read.

What kind of coding? just look up if the program or code or whatever you want to work on works on the system.

Such as if you want to use something like Visual Studio, go for Windows.

 

My choice would be Windows, but that is just because of the languages I work on.


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As Minibois suggested, windows. It's much better to start there, as you don't have to learn a new OS right away. Most languages can be done through windows


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Posted · Original PosterOP

What kind of coding? just look up if the program or code or whatever you want to work on works on the system.

Such as if you want to use something like Visual Studio, go for Windows.

 

My choice would be Windows, but that is just because of the languages I work on.

 

I want to teach myself Ruby and Java. I heard Ruby is pretty basic and Java is just nice to know. Maybe even Python.  After that I'd move on to something like C+ or simply change majors to computer science from accounting.


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I want to teach myself Ruby and Java. I heard Ruby is pretty basic and Java is just nice to know. Maybe even Python.  After that I'd move on to something like C+ or simply change majors to computer science from accounting.

For you I would probably just recommend Windows.


"So, our goal today is to determine whether the waifu is hot" - Steve, Gamers Nexus

 

"There's no such thing as perfect. You're beautiful as you are Courage. With all your imperfections you can do anything." - Bathtub Barracuda

"Wish i could find a way to stop the pain.         -         Besides the one that i keep thinking of."

My gear:                    

Spoiler

PC:

The brains: AMD Ryzen 7 1700 ||

The torso: MSI X370 Gaming Pro Carbon ||

Short term memory: 2x8GB G.Skill TridentZ RGB 3200Mhz ||

Pixel pusher: EVGA RTX 2070 Super XC Gaming || 

Where I store memes: Samsung 960 EVO 250GB + Seagate Barracuda 2TB + Samsung 860 EVO 1TB || 

Un-heater: Be Quiet! Dark Rock 3 ||

Carboard box: Thermaltake Core G21 TG ||

Power squid: Corsair RM750x ||

 

Peripherals:

Sound helmet: Beyerdynamic DT-990 250 Ohm ||

Clickity-clack (sadly not clicky :() : Coolermaster Masterkeys Pro S RGB ||

Return the (drawing) slab! : Wacom Intuos Pen Small (2015) ||

Rodent: Asus ROG Gladius ||

Cloth for rodent: CM Storm Swift-RX XXL ||

 

Old PC:

CPU: AMD Athlon X2 255 || Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO || RAM: 4x2GB DDR3 || GPU: Nvidia Quadro 512MB || Case: Antec Sonata III || PSU: Antec Earthwatts 500W Bronze

Setup: Current setup

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I want to teach myself Ruby and Java. I heard Ruby is pretty basic and Java is just nice to know. Maybe even Python.  After that I'd move on to something like C+ or simply change majors to computer science from accounting.

 

You can do all of those in windows. Download python, ruby and VS and you'll have a nice starting point.

https://www.ruby-lang.org/en/

https://www.python.org/

http://www.visualstudio.com/


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CPU: Core i7 5820k @ 4.7GHz || GPU: Dual Titan X || Motherboard: Asus X99 Deluxe || RAM: 32GB Crucial Ballistix Sport || Monitors: MX299Q, 29UB65, LG 34UM95 || Storage: Dual Samsung 850 EVO 1 TB in Raid 0, Samsung 850 EVO 250GB, 2TB Toshiba scratch disk, 3TB Seagate Barracuda || PSU: EVGA 1000w PS Platinum

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Linux unless you need visual studio. At least it's what I prefer. I find it has a neater interface and it's also great to bathe yourself into open source from the start, great for a programmer.


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Posted · Original PosterOP

Should I start with something like Java since it seems to be a highly used language? Then work on Ruby, Python, and C++??


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I have a Linux VM set up that runs my web server, and I use VMWare shared folders to edit the files in Windows. Much easier than having to reboot every time you want to work on something.

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Should I start with something like Java since it seems to be a highly used language? Then work on Ruby, Python, and C++??

 

You will probably need to start with a few. You'll need em.


The projects never end in my line of work.

CPU: Dual Xeon E5-2650v2 || GPU: Dual Quadro K5000 || Motherboard: Asus Z9PE-D8 || RAM: 64GB Corsair Vengeance || Monitors: Dual LG 34UM95, NEC MultiSync EA244UHD || Storage: Dual Samsung 850 Pro 256GB in Raid 0, 6x WD Re 4TB in Raid 1 || Sound: Xonar Essense STX (Mainly for Troubleshooting and listening test) || PSU: Corsair Ax1500i

CPU: Core i7 5820k @ 4.7GHz || GPU: Dual Titan X || Motherboard: Asus X99 Deluxe || RAM: 32GB Crucial Ballistix Sport || Monitors: MX299Q, 29UB65, LG 34UM95 || Storage: Dual Samsung 850 EVO 1 TB in Raid 0, Samsung 850 EVO 250GB, 2TB Toshiba scratch disk, 3TB Seagate Barracuda || PSU: EVGA 1000w PS Platinum

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Posted · Original PosterOP

You will probably need to start with a few. You'll need em.

I would like to learn one at a time since it isn't my major atm. I plan on learning all of them but just want a good starting point to get my feet wet so to speak. :)


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Start with Python or Java, and if you're ambitious dive right in to C++. And Windows should work just fine for you, assuming you have a license. If licensing is an issue, go for Linux. Search around and find a distro that suits your needs best. Good luck!


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It is a lot easier to set up everything in a linux distro but for your case as a beginner, just start with what you are familiar with.

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I am thinking about learning some computer programming on the side. I just built a new PC and I plan on converting my old one into a dedicated work station. Mainly for school work (I'm not accounting major so it'll be mostly word docs and online work sheets) and so I don't have games on it to distract me while working. Might throw two WD greens in raid 1. ANYWAYS! Would you suggest linux or windows for programming? I was reading Macs Unix based OS is good because it is a lot like linux. I haven't used a mac before just going off what I read.

If the ide you want to use works on Linux save yourself $100 for something else.


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My preferred method is to run Windows but do all development and testing in Vagrant boxes. Much more flexible and extensible.

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My experience is that Linux is way easier to use as a programming environment than Windows, command line interface is so much faster than most of the Windows programming environments. Every time I start developing something on Linux and I later switch to a Windows machine it seems overly complicated to get things set up. Linux is in my opinion the way to go for every kind of software development, except for Microsoft based applications. Luckily I don't like to develop solely for Microsoft devices, so I can stick with my Linux based machines.


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I have Linux on my laptop and Windows on my desktop.

 

In my experience, any programming tool on Windows generally has an equivalent tool on Linux. Wine is also an option for most of the tools that don't have alternatives.

 

I don't really see any reason to go to Linux over Windows for programming. Both of them are about equivalent, as long as you don't require Microsoft products.

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Linux would be better unless you are coding in C# (Which is a Windows specific language)


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I'd start with windows since it has the higher market share. Tho I suppose it depends what type of things your interested in programming. IE if you like lots of server based things maybe Linux really depends tho. Not like windows servers don't exist. But if you start with windows probably the smartest option. And I have no loyalty's to Microsoft, in fact I don't even like them.

But if your going to develop software to sell, etc etc, the higher market share is windows users. And you can always make applications that are cross compatible. Depending on your language choice.

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Linux would be better unless you are coding in C# (Which is a Windows specific language)

Why is Linux better? As far as I can tell, it's just like Windows, except there are a lot less GUIs, and the programs that do have GUIs tend to have worse GUIs than their Windows equivalent. OllyDBG vs EDB for example, OllyDBG is way easier to use.

 

C# mono lets C# applications run on Linux, though the support is probably a lot worse than Microsoft.

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Why is Linux better? As far as I can tell, it's just like Windows, except there are a lot less GUIs, and the programs that do have GUIs tend to have worse GUIs than their Windows equivalent. OllyDBG vs EDB for example, OllyDBG is way easier to use.

 

C# mono lets C# applications run on Linux, though the support is probably a lot worse than Microsoft.

Well...to start, Linux and Windows are very different.

 

Windows is made by Microsoft, a company that like all companies wants to make money. You have to pay for Windows.

Linux is an open source operating system kernel with many different distributions to fit the different needs of different users. Due to it being open source, Linux gives you the freedom to do whatever you please with the operating system, and no company will get in the way. Linux is (almost all of the time) free.

 

For the GUIs of programs, I personally haven't had any problem with them. Windows does have more programs than Linux due to the fact that it has more users. Therefore, it would have more programs that are user friendly.

 

As for C# support, Windows wins becasue C# is a Windows-specific programming language. No surprise there.

 

I suggested Linux because I like it. Linux is very lightweight and is far less prone to viruses/malware. It is free and open source too. I really like the GUI of Ubuntu, and I enjoy using the operating system in general.


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Well...to start, Linux and Windows are very different.

 

Windows is made by Microsoft, a company that like all companies wants to make money. You have to pay for Windows.

Linux is an open source operating system kernel with many different distributions to fit the different needs of different users. Due to it being open source, Linux gives you the freedom to do whatever you please with the operating system, and no company will get in the way. Linux is (almost all of the time) free.

 

For the GUIs of programs, I personally haven't had any problem with them. Windows does have more programs than Linux due to the fact that it has more users. Therefore, it would have more programs that are user friendly.

 

As for C# support, Windows wins becasue C# is a Windows-specific programming language. No surprise there.

 

I suggested Linux because I like it. Linux is very lightweight and is far less prone to viruses/malware. It is free and open source too. I really like the GUI of Ubuntu, and I enjoy using the operating system in general.

Whether or not it's free does not affect its functionality, unless you want to make kernel modifications for some reason, but that's not a thing most people do.

 

A lot of programs when ported to Linux just get no GUI. Folding @ home, prime95, FASM, etc. just don't have a version with a GUI. People recommend programs to me like GDB, which is entirely on command line; when I want a new program, people tell me to install through the command line. Not that many things are done through GUIs, like would be done on Windows.

 

C# is not windows specific. Mono can run C# programs on Linux, as far as I can tell. 

 

Is Linux actually less prone to viruses or does it just seem that way because there are fewer viruses? Everyone tells me Linux is less prone to viruses, but you'd think something with as many viruses as Windows would have had all the security issues patched quickly.

 

I'm also running Ubuntu and haven't had any real issues with it, other than trying to get the same software support as I have in Windows.

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