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James Woods

Newb Question: Why don't they make mobos with two sockets for CPU & GPU?

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EDIT: I totally read the title wrong.


SPECS:CPU: i5-4440 @ 3.10GHz, GPU: Gigabyte G1 970, Ram: 8Gigs of HyperX Black, Mobo:Gigabyte GA-H81M-HD2, HDD: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM, Case: Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mid Tower, PSU: EVGA 600W, SSD: Crucial MX200 256GB

"The choice is yours, but you choose to fail" -  Jesse Barnett

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CPU only goes into a socket and there are many types of sockets such as LGA-1150 1155 2011 and AM3+ (AMD)

Whilst a GPU goes into a lane called PCI or PCI-E or if you're old school AGP

 

 

If you take a GPU appart there is still a proccessor inside. Why couldent motherboard makers intigrade that to there boards and make the pci slots obsolete.

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If you take a GPU appart there is still a proccessor inside. Why couldent motherboard makers intigrade that to there boards and make the pci slots obsolete.

I edited my post :P


SPECS:CPU: i5-4440 @ 3.10GHz, GPU: Gigabyte G1 970, Ram: 8Gigs of HyperX Black, Mobo:Gigabyte GA-H81M-HD2, HDD: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM, Case: Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mid Tower, PSU: EVGA 600W, SSD: Crucial MX200 256GB

"The choice is yours, but you choose to fail" -  Jesse Barnett

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I assume there's a good reason for it. Right?

They do.  Just not at the consumer level.  That kind of stuff is reserved for professional applications like servers, as it doesn't make sense for a consumer to have one.  You can, however, have multiple GPU's at the consumer level.

 

Link to a dual-socket server motherboard:

http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813132256


QUOTE ME OR I PROBABLY WON'T SEE YOUR RESPONSE 

My Setup:

 

Desktop (haven't named it yet)

Spoiler

CPU: Ryzen 9 3900X  CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D15  Motherboard: Asus Prime X370-PRO  RAM: 32GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 @3200MHz  GPU: EVGA RTX 2080 FTW3 ULTRA (+50 core +400 memory)  Storage: 1050GB Crucial MX300, 1TB Crucial MX500  PSU: EVGA Supernova 750 P2  Chassis: NZXT Noctis 450 White/Blue OS: Windows 10 Professional  Displays: Asus MG279Q FreeSync OC, LG 27GL850-B

 

Main Laptop:

Spoiler

Laptop: Sager NP 8678-S  CPU: Intel Core i7 6820HK @ 2.7GHz  RAM: 32GB DDR4 @ 2133MHz  GPU: GTX 980m 8GB  Storage: 250GB Samsung 850 EVO M.2 + 1TB Samsung 850 Pro + 1TB 7200RPM HGST HDD  OS: Windows 10 Pro  Chassis: Clevo P670RG  Audio: HyperX Cloud II Gunmetal, Audio Technica ATH-M50s, JBL Creature II

 

Thinkpad T420:

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CPU: i5 2520M  RAM: 8GB DDR3  Storage: 275GB Crucial MX30

 

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They do.  Just not at the consumer level.  That kind of stuff is reserved for professional applications like servers, as it doesn't make sense for a consumer to have one.  You can, however, have multiple GPU's at the consumer level.

 

Link to a dual-socket server motherboard:

http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813132256

 

Read more closely, he's asking about a dual socket board where one socket fits a CPU and one socket fits a GPU.

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Read more closely, he's asking about a dual socket board where one socket fits a CPU and one socket fits a GPU.

Oh shoot, sorry.


QUOTE ME OR I PROBABLY WON'T SEE YOUR RESPONSE 

My Setup:

 

Desktop (haven't named it yet)

Spoiler

CPU: Ryzen 9 3900X  CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D15  Motherboard: Asus Prime X370-PRO  RAM: 32GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 @3200MHz  GPU: EVGA RTX 2080 FTW3 ULTRA (+50 core +400 memory)  Storage: 1050GB Crucial MX300, 1TB Crucial MX500  PSU: EVGA Supernova 750 P2  Chassis: NZXT Noctis 450 White/Blue OS: Windows 10 Professional  Displays: Asus MG279Q FreeSync OC, LG 27GL850-B

 

Main Laptop:

Spoiler

Laptop: Sager NP 8678-S  CPU: Intel Core i7 6820HK @ 2.7GHz  RAM: 32GB DDR4 @ 2133MHz  GPU: GTX 980m 8GB  Storage: 250GB Samsung 850 EVO M.2 + 1TB Samsung 850 Pro + 1TB 7200RPM HGST HDD  OS: Windows 10 Pro  Chassis: Clevo P670RG  Audio: HyperX Cloud II Gunmetal, Audio Technica ATH-M50s, JBL Creature II

 

Thinkpad T420:

Spoiler

CPU: i5 2520M  RAM: 8GB DDR3  Storage: 275GB Crucial MX30

 

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You could never make PCI-E obsolete, at least not now.  There numerous expansion cards from lots of different companies that serve many different purposes, and getting rid of a universal format is kind of tough.


QUOTE ME OR I PROBABLY WON'T SEE YOUR RESPONSE 

My Setup:

 

Desktop (haven't named it yet)

Spoiler

CPU: Ryzen 9 3900X  CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D15  Motherboard: Asus Prime X370-PRO  RAM: 32GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 @3200MHz  GPU: EVGA RTX 2080 FTW3 ULTRA (+50 core +400 memory)  Storage: 1050GB Crucial MX300, 1TB Crucial MX500  PSU: EVGA Supernova 750 P2  Chassis: NZXT Noctis 450 White/Blue OS: Windows 10 Professional  Displays: Asus MG279Q FreeSync OC, LG 27GL850-B

 

Main Laptop:

Spoiler

Laptop: Sager NP 8678-S  CPU: Intel Core i7 6820HK @ 2.7GHz  RAM: 32GB DDR4 @ 2133MHz  GPU: GTX 980m 8GB  Storage: 250GB Samsung 850 EVO M.2 + 1TB Samsung 850 Pro + 1TB 7200RPM HGST HDD  OS: Windows 10 Pro  Chassis: Clevo P670RG  Audio: HyperX Cloud II Gunmetal, Audio Technica ATH-M50s, JBL Creature II

 

Thinkpad T420:

Spoiler

CPU: i5 2520M  RAM: 8GB DDR3  Storage: 275GB Crucial MX30

 

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I assume there's a good reason for it. Right?

the graphic cards are realy complex.

a single gpu kinda like a cpu+mobo+ram.

so, if a mobo sopport socket gpu, everything will be limited and so much more things need to pick.

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nVidia and AMD GPUs would use different sockets, creating the need for X99+AMD boards, X99+nVidia boards, Z97+AMD boards, Z97+nVidia boards, AM3++nVidia boards, AM3++AMD boards, FM2++AMD boards and FM2++nVidia boards. That's a lot. Then there's also the need to make GDDR5 memory modules. And think about the practicality of having 5 air coolers bolted to a board in 4way SLi/CF. In short, it will be very impractical


Part of the Q6600 club

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Really not a good idea for us.

 

You can't just remove your Haswell CPU and mount another one based on different architecture like Haswell-E or AMD FX but that is okay because CPU is not something that you would want to replace every 6 months.

 

But this is not the same for GPUs. What happens when you want to upgrade from Kepler to Maxwell? What happens when you don't like Maxwell and want to try new AMD GPUs? Are you gonna change motherboard everytime? You can now build a system based on 5960X and use it for many years with many different GPUs. This wouldn't be possible if we didn't have what we have now on consumer level. And we didn't even talk about SLI-CF capabilities yet.

 

It's really not that practical for people like us.


INTEL Core i7-4790K  ASUS Maximus VII Ranger  CORSAIR Vengeance Pro 8GB 2133MHz  EVGA GeForce GTX 980 Ti  SAMSUNG 850 EVO 250GB  CORSAIR AX860i  CORSAIR Obsidian 750D

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/Still waiting on Dual-APU motherboards to be a thing... Hybrid APU Crossfire would be nice (for some)


Maximums - Asus Z97-K /w i5 4690 Bclk @106.9Mhz * x39 = 4.17Ghz, 8GB of 2600Mhz DDR3,.. Gigabyte GTX970 G1-Gaming @ 1550Mhz

 

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