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TheDoubleYGamer

DSLR Buying Guide

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Intro

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I would like to preface this buying guide by saying I am going to try and be as unbiased as possible. I will not be mentioning any of the gear I have or my personal opinions. I will simply be laying out the facts for you, the reader, to make your own opinions and informed decisions.

 

 

 

 

 

As of now, this will only have Nikon and Camera gear listed since that is all that I am personally informed with. I do not want to spread false information.

 

 

 

 

 

I will be using the North American name for Canon Cameras, sorry for any confusion that my come from this.

 

 

 

 

 

If you know a lot about other camera manufacturers, please feel free to PM me with all the information you know. If I feel the need, I will add it to this post.

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you <3 :)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Camera Body’s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nikon D3300 and Canon EOS Rebel T3i

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Both cameras have what’s called a Crop Factor, which you can read more about here. On Nikon bodies it’s a 1.5x Crop Factor, and on Canon it’s a 1.6x Crop Factor. What this means is that a 50mm lens on a Nikon body is actually about the equivalent of a 75mm lens on what’s called a Full Frame body, which you can read more about here.

 

 

 

 

 

On to the pricing and specifications.

 

 

 

 

 

The Nikon D3300 with a 18-55mm kit lens is currently just shy of $600 on Amazon, link here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Canon EOS Rebel T3i with a 18-55mm kit lens is currently just shy of $600 as well on Amazon, link here.

 

 

 

 

 

Megapixels:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Nikon D3300 has a 24.2 Megapixel APS-C 1.5x Crop Factor sensor, which allows for large amount of detail. This also means a single Raw file is around ~24MB.

 

 

 

 

 

The Canon EOS Rebel T3i has a 18.0 Megapixel APS-C 1.6x Crop Factor sensor, which allow allows for large amount of detail. This also means a single Raw file is around ~18MB.

 

 

 

 

 

Perceived Megapixels While Using The Kit Lens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So I already stated above what the Megapixel count on the Camera Sensor itself is. Now let’s talk about perceived Megapixels while using the kit, 18-55mm lens, is. The only reason I am presenting you with these facts is because most of you will just be using a kit lens. All facts taken from DxOMark Optics. A highly trusted website used by many professional photographers, one of the more vocal being Tony Northup, a Wildlife Photographer.

 

 

 

 

 

If you don’t know what a perceived Megapixel count is, you can read more about that here.

 

 

 

 

 

On the Nikon D3300 with the 18-55mm kit lens, the perceived Megapixel count is 7 Megapixels. Yes, you read that correctly. 7 Megapixels. This is due to the lower quality of glass used in the lens compared to higher end solutions.

 

 

 

 

 

On the Canon EOS Rebel T3i with the 18-55mm kit lens, the perceived Megapixel count is 8 Megapixels, a slight improvement over the Nikon stock lens. Again, this is due to the lower quality of glass used in this lens compared to higher end solutions.

 

 

 

 

 

ISO Range

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you don’t know anything about ISO, you can read more about it here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Nikon D3330 has an ISO Range of 100-25,600. When shooting at ISO 25,600, you can shoot in some very low light situations, which can be very useful. However, you will start to see what is called noise, which you can read more about here. Anything beyond ISO 3200 or 6400 on the D3300 doesn’t look very pleasing and is not recommended unless absolutely necessary.

 

 

 

 

 

The Canon EOS Rebel T3i has an ISO Range of 100-12,800. When shooting at ISO 12,800, you can shoot in very low light situations, which can be very useful. However, you will start to see what is called noise, which you can read more about here. Anything beyond ISO 3200 or 6400 on the T3i doesn’t look very pleasing and is not recommended unless absolutely necessary.

 

 

 

 

 

So, the difference between ISO 25,600 (D3300) and ISO 12,800 (T3i) may sound like a lot, but it actually isn’t. It’s only 1 full stop of light, which you can read more about here. Don’t let those big number confuse you too much, you’ll get the hang of it!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Video Capabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I figured some of you would be interested in video production, so I will include this section.

 

 

 

 

 

The Nikon D3300 can record at 1080/60p. You can see a test video here. It has no continuous autofocus capabilities while recording video, however you can use still use autofocus, just not continues autofocus.

 

 

 

 

 

The Canon EOS Rebel T3i can record at 1080/30p. You can see a test video here. It has no continuous autofocus capabilities while recording video, however you can still use autofocus, just not continues autofocus.

 

 

 

 

 

Nikon D5300 and Canon EOS Rebel T5i

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Both cameras have what’s called a Crop Factor, which you can read more about here. On Nikon bodies it’s a 1.5x Crop Factor, and on Canon it’s a 1.6x Crop Factor. What this means is that a 50mm lens on a Nikon body is actually about the equivalent of a 75mm lens on what’s called a Full Frame body, which you can read more about here.

 

 

 

 

 

On to the pricing and specifications.

 

 

 

 

 

The Nikon D5300 with a 18-55mm kit lens is currently $850 on Amazon, link here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Canon EOS Rebel T5i with a 18-55mm kit lens is currently $750 as well on Amazon, link here.

 

 

 

 

 

Megapixels

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Nikon D5300 has a 24.2 Megapixel APS-C 1.5x Crop Factor sensor, which allows for large amount of detail. This also means a single Raw file is around ~24MB.

 

 

 

 

 

The Canon EOS Rebel T5i has a 18.0 Megapixel APS-C 1.6x Crop Factor sensor, which allow allows for large amount of detail. This also means a single Raw file is around ~18MB.

 

 

 

 

 

Perceived Megapixels While Using The Kit Lens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So I already stated above what the Megapixel count on the Camera Sensor itself is. Now let’s talk about perceived Megapixels while using the kit, 18-55mm lens, is. The only reason I am presenting you with these facts is because most of you will just be using a kit lens. All facts taken from DxOMark Optics. A highly trusted website used by many professional photographers, one of the more vocal being Tony Northup, a Wildlife Photographer.

 

 

 

 

 

If you don’t know what a perceived Megapixel count is, you can read more about that here.

 

 

 

 

 

On the Nikon D5300 with the 18-55mm kit lens, the perceived Megapixel count is 7 Megapixels. Yes, you read that correctly. 7 Megapixels. This is due to the lower quality of glass used in the lens compared to higher end solutions.

 

 

 

 

 

On the Canon EOS Rebel T5i with the 18-55mm kit lens, the perceived Megapixel count is 8 Megapixels, a slight improvement over the Nikon stock lens. Again, this is due to the lower quality of glass used in this lens compared to higher end solutions.

 

 

 

 

 

ISO Range

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you don’t know anything about ISO, you can read more about it here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Nikon D5300 has an ISO Range of 100-25,600. When shooting at ISO 25,600, you can shoot in some very low light situations, which can be very useful. However, you will start to see what is called noise, which you can read more about here. Anything beyond ISO 3200 or 6400 on the D5300 doesn’t look very pleasing and is not recommended unless absolutely necessary.

 

 

 

 

 

The Canon EOS Rebel T5i has an ISO Range of 100-25,600. When shooting at ISO 25,600, you can shoot in very low light situations, which can be very useful. However, you will start to see what is called noise, which you can read more about here. Anything beyond ISO 3200 or 6400 on the T5i doesn’t look very pleasing and is not recommended unless absolutely necessary.

 

 

 

 

 

Video Capabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I figured some of you would be interested in video production, so I will include this section.

 

 

 

 

 

The Nikon D5300 can record at 1080/60p. You can see a test video here. It has no continuous autofocus capabilities while recording video, however you can use still use autofocus, just not continues autofocus.

 

 

The Canon EOS Rebel T5i can record at 1080/30p. You can see a test video here. It has continuous autofocus capabilities during video.

 

 

 

 

 

Nikon D7100 and Canon EOS 70D

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Both cameras have what’s called a Crop Factor, which you can read more about here. On Nikon bodies it’s a 1.5x Crop Factor, and on Canon it’s a 1.6x Crop Factor. What this means is that a 50mm lens on a Nikon body is actually about the equivalent of a 75mm lens on what’s called a Full Frame body, which you can read more about here.

 

 

 

 

 

On to the pricing and specifications.

 

 

 

 

 

The Nikon D7100 with a 18-140mm kit lens is currently just shy of $1,400 on Amazon, link here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Canon EOS 70D with a 18-135mm kit lens is currently $1,450 as well on Amazon, link here.

 

 

 

 

 

Megapixels

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Nikon D7100 has a 24.1 Megapixel APS-C 1.5x Crop Factor sensor, which allows for large amount of detail. This also means a single Raw file is around ~24MB.

 

 

 

 

 

The Canon EOS 70D has a 20.2 Megapixel APS-C 1.6x Crop Factor sensor, which allow allows for large amount of detail. This also means a single Raw file is around ~20MB.

 

 

 

 

 

Perceived Megapixels While Using The Kit Lens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So I already stated above what the Megapixel count on the Camera Sensor itself is. Now let’s talk about perceived Megapixels while using the kit, 18-140&135mm (respectively) lens, is. The only reason I am presenting you with these facts is because most of you will just be using a kit lens. All facts taken from DxOMark Optics. A highly trusted website used by many professional photographers, one of the more vocal being Tony Northup, a Wildlife Photographer.

 

 

 

 

 

If you don’t know what a perceived Megapixel count is, you can read more about that here.

 

 

 

 

 

On the Nikon D7100 with the 18-140mm kit lens, the perceived Megapixel count is 8 Megapixels. Yes, you read that correctly. 8 Megapixels. This is due to the lower quality of glass used in the lens compared to higher end solutions.

 

 

 

 

 

On the Canon EOS 70D with the 18-135mm kit lens, the perceived Megapixel count is 8 Megapixels. Again, this is due to the lower quality of glass used in this lens compared to higher end solutions.

 

 

 

 

 

ISO Range

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you don’t know anything about ISO, you can read more about it here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Nikon D7100 has an ISO Range of 100-25,600. When shooting at ISO 25,600, you can shoot in some very low light situations, which can be very useful. However, you will start to see what is called noise, which you can read more about here. Anything beyond ISO 3200 or 6400 on the D7100 doesn’t look very pleasing and is not recommended unless absolutely necessary.

 

 

 

 

 

The Canon EOS 70D has an ISO Range of 100-25,600. When shooting at ISO 25,600, you can shoot in very low light situations, which can be very useful. However, you will start to see what is called noise, which you can read more about here. Anything beyond ISO 3200 or 6400 on the 70D doesn’t look very pleasing and is not recommended unless absolutely necessary.

 

 

 

 

 

Video Capabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I figured some of you would be interested in video production, so I will include this section.

 

 

 

 

 

The Nikon D7100 can record at 1080/60i. It has continuous autofocus capabilities during video. 

 

 

 

 

 

The Canon EOS 70D can record at 1080/30p. It has continuous autofocus capabilities during video.

 

 

Here is a test video comparing the two.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you all for checking out this guide, I will be sure to add more Camera’s to this whenever I get time! I thought it’d be good to get this out as soon of possible, so please PM me if you find an issue with this guide. Please do NOT post issues in this thread.

 

 

 

 

 

Leave any questions on this page. If you want more opinionated answers, feel free to make a new thread and I’m sure many people can give you their opinions on which cameras would the best for your use scenario.

 

 

 

 

 

Please PM me if you think anything should be added to the Camera comparison.

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks all!

 

 

<3

 

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Nice! Really helpful. Will read it all later.

 

Noticing a mistake though, under the video section for the 70D I can see you copied it from the T5i, because it still says T5i in that section.

 

EDIT: Also, for video work, (mainly, still doing some photo as well) Do you think the 70D is worth it or would a newer body like a T5i be more practical for the price? What does the 70D still have over the T5i? (In photo as well, like HDR?)

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Posted · Original PosterOP

EDIT: Also, for video work, (mainly, still doing some photo as well) Do you think the 70D is worth it or would a newer body like a T5i be more practical for the price? What does the 70D still have over the T5i? (In photo as well, like HDR?)

If you're using the camera for Youtube work, I'd say the T5i or even the T3i is more of a logical purchase. With Youtube compression you likely won't notice the difference between the two when shown at the same bitrate. 

 

If you're doing it for semi-pro work, still get the T5i with a nice "L" lens. 

 

Bubble sees an error.

 

The D7100 doesn't record in 1080/60p, it however does record in 1080/60i. Also, I think there is continuous AF in video for the D7100 

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/nikon-d7100/nikon-d7100VIDEO.HTM

Please read the end of the thread. 

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Hey thanks for this! I might add some information about mirrorless cameras as I think they add a lot of value against these DSLR's 


CPU: AMD Ryzen 1700X / MOBO: ASUS B350F Strix / RAM: Corsair 16GB DDR4-3000 / GPU: MSI GTX1060 / SSD: Samsung EVO 500GB, OCZ 500GB / HDD: Seagate 4TB, WD Black 4TB / PSU: Seasonic 650W Gold / Case: Fractal Design Meshify C / Cooler: Noctua NH-U14S / KB: Logitech G710+/ Mouse:Logitech G900/ OS: Windows 10

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Hey thanks for this! I might add some information about mirrorless cameras as I think they add a lot of value against these DSLR's 

Feel free to PM me :) 

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On the Nikon D7100 with the 18-140mm kit lens, the perceived Megapixel count is 8 Megapixels. Yes, you read that correctly. 7 Megapixels.

 

How ironic that it says "Yes, you read that correctly." xD

 

But damn, kit lenses are a lot worse than I thought. It's such a shame L lenses are so expensive though :/

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I think you should mention that how one uses the kit lens really affects the perceived megapixel count. A stopped down 18-55 from both companies are actually quite sharp. Yes if you're using the kit's wide open you may get as low as 7/8mp but stop it down to f8/f11 the kit lenses are actually scary sharp. 

 

Oh and this may be out of the scope of the guide but you should really express that with DSLR's its not the bodies its glass glass glass. + technique I guess

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Posted · Original PosterOP

I think you should mention that how one uses the kit lens really affects the perceived megapixel count. A stopped down 18-55 from both companies are actually quite sharp. Yes if you're using the kit's wide open you may get as low as 7/8mp but stop it down to f8/f11 the kit lenses are actually scary sharp. 

 

Oh and this may be out of the scope of the guide but you should really express that with DSLR's its not the bodies its glass glass glass. + technique I guess

I agree, it's all about glass. I will be adding lesnes to this sheet in the near future. I just need to find time to write it up. 

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Hmmm... It's a nice write up, but you're only including camera comparisons between Nikon and Canon. I wonder if, for a DSLR Buying Guide, you may want to approach the subject in a more holistic way. Perhaps if you talked about megapixels, shutter speeds, ISO, sensor sizes, dynamic range, etc and what they are and why you want them, then the reader would have a better idea at deciding which features are more important to their needs.

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Would be nice if you also covered micro 4/3 cameras. Their more compact than traditional DSLRs and have some of the same feature sets. The only thing though is that they are pretty expensive.


▶ Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning. - Einstein◀

Please remember to mark a thread as solved if your issue has been fixed, it helps other who may stumble across the thread at a later point in time.

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Would be nice if you also covered micro 4/3 cameras. Their more compact than traditional DSLRs and have some of the same feature sets. The only thing though is that they are pretty expensive.

I was going to add this part to it, but I've just been so busy aha. Will try to write one up again and Pm him. 


CPU: AMD Ryzen 1700X / MOBO: ASUS B350F Strix / RAM: Corsair 16GB DDR4-3000 / GPU: MSI GTX1060 / SSD: Samsung EVO 500GB, OCZ 500GB / HDD: Seagate 4TB, WD Black 4TB / PSU: Seasonic 650W Gold / Case: Fractal Design Meshify C / Cooler: Noctua NH-U14S / KB: Logitech G710+/ Mouse:Logitech G900/ OS: Windows 10

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Would be nice if you also covered micro 4/3 cameras. Their more compact than traditional DSLRs and have some of the same feature sets. The only thing though is that they are pretty expensive.

 

Not necessarily, the Panasonic GH2 or GH3 can be picked up for less than $1000; both still hold up very well, especially if you're doing video. The 'new' Olympus OM-D line is nice as well. Though their video capabilities are a bit limited.

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Not necessarily, the Panasonic GH2 or GH3 can be picked up for less than $1000; both still hold up very well, especially if you're doing video. The 'new' Olympus OM-D line is nice as well. Though their video capabilities are a bit limited.

Sub $1000? Things have changed since I bought my older Panasonic Lumix about 4-5 years ago...


▶ Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning. - Einstein◀

Please remember to mark a thread as solved if your issue has been fixed, it helps other who may stumble across the thread at a later point in time.

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Sub $1000? Things have changed since I bought my older Panasonic Lumix about 4-5 years ago...

 

Granted, used or body only; but if you're going to be spending ~$1500 on a camera, that leaves a decent amount left over for lenses.

 

Used GH2 w/ 14-140mm kit lens starts at ~$800 http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B0043VE31O/ref=dp_olp_used?ie=UTF8&condition=used

 

New body only GH3 is $800 as well. http://www.amazon.com/Panasonic-DMC-GH2-Interchangeable-Free-Angle-Black/dp/B0043VE26U/ref=sr_1_1/185-8771768-7949559?ie=UTF8&qid=1414441746&sr=8-1&keywords=gh2

 

Olympus OM-D EM5 is $1k with 12-50mm kit lens, new. http://www.amazon.com/Olympus-Interchangeable-3-0-Inch-Tilting-Touchscreen/dp/B0074WDFHM/ref=sr_1_14?ie=UTF8&qid=1414442104&sr=8-14&keywords=olympus+omd

 

Also, lenses have come down in price and increased in variety/availability, which is where I see the biggest savings over going Nikon/Canon. There are definite drawbacks to m4/3, but each new generation of cameras seems to mitigate those to the point where it is nearly negligible. 

 

This just popped up:

 

GH3 (body only) for $697 ($100 gift card to BH Photo) http://www.43rumors.com/gh4-for-697-and-gx7-with-lens-for-647-at-bhphoto/

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