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5GigaaHertz

How much UPS VA is recommended my printer, monitor and PC?

The VA rating should be about 1.5 - 2x the power consumption of your components 

 

The VA rating has little to do with how much the UPS will actually keep your devices running one power is down - that depends on the capacity of the batteries the UPS is supplied with. 

 

You are probably not printing 24/7, so your printer is probably idling at 1-2 watts, and when it's actually printing it's maybe consuming 10-15w. You can pause print jobs when you notice power fails, so the power consumption of a printer is not a factor.

You wouldn't take this in account if it was a laser printer, which can consume 800w+ when printing. 

 

Yeah, monitor's gonna be 20-50w depending on brightness

Your computer's gonna be 50-100w when idle (in windows, typing documents, watching youtube or a movie)  depending on the configuration, number of mechanical drives. 

It will only consume more power if you're doing some rendering job that uses cpu at 100% (add 50w) or when you're gaming and video cars runs at full power (that's 100-300w extra depending on video card)

 

A 500-650VA UPS will be fine, but you'd be better off going with lower VA and more quality instead of just big numbers. 


off-line < line interactive < on-line ... ideally go for line interactive or on-line ups, on-line are expensive though. 

then it's simulated sine wave vs pure sine wave,  pure sine wave is better but most modern hardware can tolerate simulated sine wave just fine so it's not a big deal anymore

look at the battery capacity... the cheapest will have something like 7Ah battery, that will keep a 100w pc running for around 10 minutes or so and then take 8-14h to fill.  So depending on how often you have power failures, may want to go with something that has more capacity, or option to add external battery. 

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Posted · Original PosterOP

I searched online on what is the max load wattage of my PC, monitor and printer and this is what I found:

printer is 10W (HP Deskjet 3630 All-in-One)
monitor is 22W (Lenovo ThinkVision LT2024 20-inch)
PC is 350W/211W (Future build/Current PC respectively)

 

Is the 650VA enough for these devices?

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Depends on what u want todo with it. And how long it can deliver that power (check the spec sheet)

Normal consumer UPS'es are just for a clean shutdown. As for continued operation you would need quite alot of batteries :D 

 

With a power factor of 0.75 its actual power would be around 480W (prob lower) wihich would prob last minutes with normal UPS'es :S 

 

 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
8 minutes ago, Dujith said:

Depends on what u want todo with it. And how long it can deliver that power (check the spec sheet)

Normal consumer UPS'es are just for a clean shutdown. As for continued operation you would need quite alot of batteries :D 

 

With a power factor of 0.75 its actual power would be around 480W (prob lower) wihich would prob last minutes with normal UPS'es :S 

 

 

that is ok as I won't be using it as a powerbank. It is really for clean shutdown

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1 minute ago, 5GigaaHertz said:

that is ok as I won't be using it as a powerbank. 

??? Powerbank is for charging phones and such. UPS is emergency backup for power failures

What do you expect the UPS todo?

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The VA rating should be about 1.5 - 2x the power consumption of your components 

 

The VA rating has little to do with how much the UPS will actually keep your devices running one power is down - that depends on the capacity of the batteries the UPS is supplied with. 

 

You are probably not printing 24/7, so your printer is probably idling at 1-2 watts, and when it's actually printing it's maybe consuming 10-15w. You can pause print jobs when you notice power fails, so the power consumption of a printer is not a factor.

You wouldn't take this in account if it was a laser printer, which can consume 800w+ when printing. 

 

Yeah, monitor's gonna be 20-50w depending on brightness

Your computer's gonna be 50-100w when idle (in windows, typing documents, watching youtube or a movie)  depending on the configuration, number of mechanical drives. 

It will only consume more power if you're doing some rendering job that uses cpu at 100% (add 50w) or when you're gaming and video cars runs at full power (that's 100-300w extra depending on video card)

 

A 500-650VA UPS will be fine, but you'd be better off going with lower VA and more quality instead of just big numbers. 


off-line < line interactive < on-line ... ideally go for line interactive or on-line ups, on-line are expensive though. 

then it's simulated sine wave vs pure sine wave,  pure sine wave is better but most modern hardware can tolerate simulated sine wave just fine so it's not a big deal anymore

look at the battery capacity... the cheapest will have something like 7Ah battery, that will keep a 100w pc running for around 10 minutes or so and then take 8-14h to fill.  So depending on how often you have power failures, may want to go with something that has more capacity, or option to add external battery. 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 minute ago, Dujith said:

??? Powerbank is for charging phones and such. UPS is emergency backup for power failures

What do you expect the UPS todo?

Nevermind that. I thought you were telling me that I would use the UPS for prolonged period of time, which i was wrong

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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 minute ago, mariushm said:

The VA rating should be about 1.5 - 2x the power consumption of your components 

 

The VA rating has little to do with how much the UPS will actually keep your devices running one power is down - that depends on the capacity of the batteries the UPS is supplied with. 

 

You are probably not printing 24/7, so your printer is probably idling at 1-2 watts, and when it's actually printing it's maybe consuming 10-15w. You can pause print jobs when you notice power fails, so the power consumption of a printer is not a factor.

You wouldn't take this in account if it was a laser printer, which can consume 800w+ when printing. 

 

Yeah, monitor's gonna be 20-50w depending on brightness

Your computer's gonna be 50-100w when idle (in windows, typing documents, watching youtube or a movie)  depending on the configuration, number of mechanical drives. 

It will only consume more power if you're doing some rendering job that uses cpu at 100% (add 50w) or when you're gaming and video cars runs at full power (that's 100-300w extra depending on video card)

 

A 500-650VA UPS will be fine, but you'd be better off going with lower VA and more quality instead of just big numbers. 


off-line < line interactive < on-line ... ideally go for line interactive or on-line ups, on-line are expensive though. 

then it's simulated sine wave vs pure sine wave,  pure sine wave is better but most modern hardware can tolerate simulated sine wave just fine so it's not a big deal anymore

look at the battery capacity... the cheapest will have something like 7Ah battery, that will keep a 100w pc running for around 10 minutes or so and then take 8-14h to fill.  So depending on how often you have power failures, may want to go with something that has more capacity, or option to add external battery. 

I used their max load wattage so I could calculate that possibility(i could say the worst case scenario) but most of the time, my printer is at idle, My PC is just a Potato PC that only consumes less than 215w that I stated(2 HDDs, 2 Fans, CPU, no GPU, CPU cooler, 2 RAM sticks) and a monitor that is at full brightness even in idle.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
13 hours ago, mariushm said:

The VA rating should be about 1.5 - 2x the power consumption of your components 

 

The VA rating has little to do with how much the UPS will actually keep your devices running one power is down - that depends on the capacity of the batteries the UPS is supplied with. 

 

You are probably not printing 24/7, so your printer is probably idling at 1-2 watts, and when it's actually printing it's maybe consuming 10-15w. You can pause print jobs when you notice power fails, so the power consumption of a printer is not a factor.

You wouldn't take this in account if it was a laser printer, which can consume 800w+ when printing. 

 

Yeah, monitor's gonna be 20-50w depending on brightness

Your computer's gonna be 50-100w when idle (in windows, typing documents, watching youtube or a movie)  depending on the configuration, number of mechanical drives. 

It will only consume more power if you're doing some rendering job that uses cpu at 100% (add 50w) or when you're gaming and video cars runs at full power (that's 100-300w extra depending on video card)

 

A 500-650VA UPS will be fine, but you'd be better off going with lower VA and more quality instead of just big numbers. 


off-line < line interactive < on-line ... ideally go for line interactive or on-line ups, on-line are expensive though. 

then it's simulated sine wave vs pure sine wave,  pure sine wave is better but most modern hardware can tolerate simulated sine wave just fine so it's not a big deal anymore

look at the battery capacity... the cheapest will have something like 7Ah battery, that will keep a 100w pc running for around 10 minutes or so and then take 8-14h to fill.  So depending on how often you have power failures, may want to go with something that has more capacity, or option to add external battery. 

Why is that some UPS have wattage rating beside their volt-amp rating and their ratings are not the same?

 

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Out of those two, the first one would be better , but overall they're not very good choices.

 

APC tends to have custom batteries inside, regular lead acid batteries with extra plastic and wires that move the leads somewhere else making it harder to replace batteries, and their branded batteries are more expensive.

 

I don't know about the Backups 650... here i see in store a BX700UI model (700va, 220v input for Europe) but it looks much better, with more mains outputs and protections for modems in the back

It says it uses the APCRBC110 battery which may be the same in that one in first link : APC Replacement Battery Cartridge #110 - APC Malaysia - looks like a standard 7Ah battery (12v x 7 = 84w)  - on my store and model, it says it takes 6h to recharge and does  55.7 min @60W  or 1.3 min @300W

As for the other model, i have BV500I model with EU outputs here and the store says it's a 12v 4.5 Ah battery, so much smaller. I think it's also not really meant to be replaced, or it's much harder to replace.. store doesn't list any spare battery model but they probably look like this : https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/b-b-battery/SH4-5-12-T1/522-1036-ND/4357183

It's gonna do around 5 minutes at 150w, 10-15m at 100w, 30m at 60w

 

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