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CloudPC

Cooler Master Hyper 212 vs Be Quiet Pure Rock slim

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Hi,

I've been told to invest in a better cooler than the stock wraith so that my rig is a bit more silent

 

I was recommended the 212 however when looking on Amazon, I have found the Be Quiet Pure Rock Slim is cheaper.

 

I want to know how these two compare aswell as if the Be Quiet Cooler can run on a 650W PSU thats also supplying power to an RTX 2070 Super and an AMD Ryzen 5 3600?

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Posted · Original PosterOP
43 minutes ago, GhostRoadieBL said:

Pure rock slim is quieter and just as good if not a little better (but we're talking like 1dB and 1-2 deg C)

Thanks, but as this has 120w tdp would this work with a 650w or 700w PSU?

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4 minutes ago, CloudPC said:

Thanks, but as this has 120w tdp would this work with a 650w or 700w PSU?

The TDP is its cooling potential, i.e. it's sufficient for cooling a chip that draws 120W or less of power. The only thing that draws power on a cooler is the fan, and you're talking a few watts or so there, so nothing to even worry about.

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1 hour ago, CloudPC said:

Thanks, but as this has 120w tdp would this work with a 650w or 700w PSU?

watts of energy is just a measurement so it can refer to watts of energy in the form of heat (or heat dissipation when talking about coolers), and watts of energy in the form of electricity (when talking about PSUs) 

the R5 3600 is a 65Watt (watts of electricity which turns into watts of heat) CPU at stock settings so a 120Watt (heat dissipating) cooler can easily handle it with room to spare. 

the PSU is just supplying the electricity for the CPU to use and won't effect the cooler.

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11 minutes ago, GhostRoadieBL said:

watts of energy is just a measurement so it can refer to watts of energy in the form of heat (or heat dissipation when talking about coolers), and watts of energy in the form of electricity (when talking about PSUs) 

the R5 3600 is a 65Watt (watts of electricity which turns into watts of heat) CPU at stock settings so a 120Watt (heat dissipating) cooler can easily handle it with room to spare. 

the PSU is just supplying the electricity for the CPU to use and won't effect the cooler.

Actually, 65W is the TDP, but not the power draw. The 3600 can draw around 90W when loaded, more if it's overclocked. (Entirely different topic, but TDP in general is meaningless and arbitrary.) A 120W cooler should still be sufficient, but it's just right, not overkill as you make it sound.

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3 hours ago, Chris Pratt said:

Actually, 65W is the TDP, but not the power draw. The 3600 can draw around 90W when loaded, more if it's overclocked. (Entirely different topic, but TDP in general is meaningless and arbitrary.) A 120W cooler should still be sufficient, but it's just right, not overkill as you make it sound.

~90W is the boost clock power draw, at base clock it will draw 65W by design. TDP is a reference for the amount of energy consumed by the transistors and converted to heat based on the specific testing done by the manufacturer. Due to the processor being unable to convert or "consume" energy in any other states than the conversion of electrical to thermal energy (conservation of energy) max momentary boost a 3600 can convert 90W worth of energy to heat through transistor switching.

 

If you understood the purpose and parameters of how each company calculates TDP you would find it more useful, it is actually the most important factor in determining the exhaust heat potential of heatsinks and thermal efficiencies of one cooling medium to the next when designing a system with liquid vs air cooling vs exotic phase change cooling but that's not what the OP is asking about so no point getting into it here, I'm not interested in teaching a Thermodynamics course. 
 

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Which 212? Newest has better fan than what Evo has. So if its Evo, 100% Pure Rock Slim.


^^^^ That's my post ^^^^
<-- This is me --- That's your scrollbar -->
vvvv Who's there? vvvv

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7 hours ago, GhostRoadieBL said:

~90W is the boost clock power draw, at base clock it will draw 65W by design. TDP is a reference for the amount of energy consumed by the transistors and converted to heat based on the specific testing done by the manufacturer. Due to the processor being unable to convert or "consume" energy in any other states than the conversion of electrical to thermal energy (conservation of energy) max momentary boost a 3600 can convert 90W worth of energy to heat through transistor switching.

 

If you understood the purpose and parameters of how each company calculates TDP you would find it more useful, it is actually the most important factor in determining the exhaust heat potential of heatsinks and thermal efficiencies of one cooling medium to the next when designing a system with liquid vs air cooling vs exotic phase change cooling but that's not what the OP is asking about so no point getting into it here, I'm not interested in teaching a Thermodynamics course. 
 

AMD's formula for TDP is literally all variables. You can plug any TDP into it and pull out things like Tdie or Tambient from there. And that's exactly what they do, and Intel is no better, though their formula is just as arbitrary and meaningless. I know what TDP *should* mean. However, at least now, it's virtually meaningless.

 

As far it being the "most important factor", that's just bunk. Cooler manufacturers explicitly *disregard* the TDP numbers from AMD and Intel. The chip manufacturers give them spec sheets that they do use, but TDP is not a factor at all.

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